Applied Research Questions FINAL

Applied Research Questions FINAL - Running head: APPLIED...

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Running head: APPLIED RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1 Applied Research Questions University of Phoenix PSYCH 540 February 15, 2010
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Applied Research Questions What are the similarities between descriptive and inferential statistics? What are the differences? When should descriptive and inferential statistics be used? Both descriptive and inferential statistics are a way to take raw data and convert it into meaningful information. They both have the user perform a mathematical computation and come up with meaningful information. Descriptive statistics is just a way to summarize or describe data. For example, to find the average of the data, or the most popular value. We can go with descriptive stats. Inferential stats, on the other and make decisions about the data. We perform tests such as t-test, or ANOVAs and make conclusions about the data. You can see if two groups are statistically different with inferential stats. Descriptive statistics are used to describe the basic features of the data in a study. They provide simple summaries about the sample and the measures. Together with simple graphics analysis, they form the basis of virtually every quantitative analysis of data. Descriptive statistics can describe the actual sample we study. But to extend your conclusions to a broader population, like all such classes, all workers, all women, you must be use inferential statistics. Descriptive Statistics are used to present quantitative descriptions in a manageable form. In a research study we may have lots of measures. Or we may measure a large number of people on any measure. Descriptive statistics help us to simply large amounts of data in a sensible way. Another use for the descriptive statistics is finding the Grade Point Average (GPA) of students across a potentially wide range, of experiences. We use inferential statistics to try to infer from the sample data what the population
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might think. Or we use inferential statistics to make judgments of the probability that an observed difference between groups is a dependable one or one that might have happened by chance in this study. We use inferential statistics to make inferences from our data to more general conditions. With inferential statistics, you are trying to reach conclusions that extend beyond the immediate data alone What are the similarities between single-case and small-N research designs? What are the differences? When should single-case and small-N research designs be used? In both single and small N research you are using qualitative research methodologies, since you have a small sample size in both groups. Both groups provide rich descriptive data that is in-depth in nature. They cover a sample of projects too small or uneven to allow systematic, statistical analysis. In a single case, you are looking at one person to base your study on. Since they
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2010 for the course PSYCH PSYCH 504 taught by Professor Mella during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Applied Research Questions FINAL - Running head: APPLIED...

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