WK9 Final - 1 WATER RESOURCES MITIGATION PLAN Sarah Jo Hoyt...

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1 WATER RESOURCES MITIGATION PLAN Sarah Jo Hoyt August 23, 2009
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Water Resources Mitigation Plan It is absolutely true that water makes the world go round. Water is vital to life; it is needed to uphold human, plant and animal life. According to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development “ Everyone understands that water is essential to life. But many are only just now beginning to grasp how essential it is to everything in life – food, energy, transportation, nature, leisure, identity, culture, social norms, and virtually all the products used on a daily basis.”(World Business Council for Sustainable Development [WBCSD], 2006) The majority of the world’s fresh water supply is currently frozen in glaciers and the polar ice caps; only 2.5% of the world’s water supply is fresh water (Kirby, 2000). Clean and safe water is a basic need of human life. The ability to have access to clean and safe water is currently threatened by a combination of drastic climate change, increases in the human population and poor resource management. A World Water Week report reveals that "some of the world's wealthiest cities - such as Houston or Sydney - are using more water than can be replenished"(Foulkes, 2006). This is a problem that is facing the entire world, developing, and under-developed countries, no one is able to avoid the water crisis. Humans require water for everyday needs such as drinking, without water the human population would cease to exist. Water is also an essential need for a variety of uses such as cooking, washing and sanitation; water is also required for the irrigation of fields used to grow crops. The water that is needed for these activities must be safe and clean water. The world’s population continues to increase, the demand for clean and usable water increases as well. The African Medical Research Foundation (AMREF) released a report that stated “The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in 2003, approximately 1.1 billion people had no access to safe water and 2.4 billion had no basic sanitation.” (African Medical Research Foundation
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[AMREF]). AMREF advises that water that has not been sanitized for use by humans may carry various diseases such as “cholera, typhoid malaria, yellow fever, filariasis, river blindness, sleeping sickness, guinea worm, bilharzias, trachoma, scabies and more.” (AMREF, 3) In 2008 a cholera epidemic broke out in Zimbabwe. The disease spread quickly because the country did not have the necessary chemicals to treat the contaminated water sources or the medical supplies needed to treat those who had become sick. At the time of the CNN report on the cholera outbreak running water was not available in the capital city of Harare, residents were digging shallow holes in the ground in an attempt to find water, 11,700 people had become sick, and 473 of those people had died from contracting the cholera disease (Cable News Network [CNN], 2008). United States troops serving in Iraq were sickened by contaminated water supplies that
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2010 for the course AXIA Axia taught by Professor Na during the Spring '09 term at Phoenix School of Law.

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WK9 Final - 1 WATER RESOURCES MITIGATION PLAN Sarah Jo Hoyt...

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