lecture 8 Ch6-7 - Objectives Measures and Controls I often...

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Unformatted text preview: Objectives, Measures, and Controls I often say that when you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot express it in umbers, your knowledge is of a meager and Chapter 6: A science of manufacturing 1 numbers, your knowledge is of a meager and unsatisfactory kind; it may be the beginning of knowledge, but have scarcely, in your thoughts, advanced to the stage of Science, whatever the matter may be. – Lord Kelvin Why a Science of Manufacturing? Confusion in Industry: • too many “revolutions”:(MRP,MRPII,JIT,TOC,ERP,…,) • management by buzzword • Nature of buzzword is that of a silver bullet “a single solution for all situations” • There is a lack of reliance on the underlying science of 2 manufacturing Why Science ? • Many applied fields rely on science s Medicine – Biology, chemistry, etc s Civil Eng – Statics, Dynamics, etc Why a Science of Manufacturing? • It offers precision • Relations like F=m*a, offer a basic relation of physics, offers intuition and facilitates synthesis of complex systems • Underlying Sciences may differ but they have the llowing features in common 3 following features in common 1. Offer quantitative relationships describing the system behavior 2. Founded on theories for simple systems, around which theories for more complex real-world systems are built 3. They contain intuitive relationships Example Product Design Requirements: • New concept involves a 3-KvW motor • running on standard household voltage and wiring (120 volts with a 20 ampere breaker) Can we do it? 4 Answer: No way! P=IV 3000 Watts=(I) (120 volts) = 25 amperes P= Power, I= current, V= voltage Factory Design Requirements: • 3000 units per day, • with a lead time of not greater than 10 days, • and with a service level (percent of jobs that finish on time) of at least 90%. 5 Can we do it? Answer: Equivalent formula for factory design ? Who knows? Factory Tradeoff Curves 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 (days) One possibility: generate a relationship between the service and lead time 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 74 77 81 85 89 93 97 Lead Time( S e rv ic e in % 2400 2600 2800 3000 Systems Analysis Definition: Systems analysis is a structured approach to problem-solving that involves 1. Identification of objectives (what you want to accomplish), measures (for comparing alternatives), and controls (what you can change). . Generation of specific lternatives 7 2. Generation of specific alternatives . 3. Modeling (some form of abstraction from reality to facilitate comparison of alternatives). 4. Optimization (at least to the extent of ranking alternatives and choosing “best” one)....
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2010 for the course IE 654 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at 카이스트, 한국과학기술원.

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lecture 8 Ch6-7 - Objectives Measures and Controls I often...

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