Fall09_Week10-summary - Music and Nation MUS 302L Week 10...

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Music and Nation MUS 302L Week 10
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Timeline 2009 1400 1600 1720 1800 1900 800 Middle Ages Baroque Classical Renaissance 1800 1900 Beethoven Schubert 1860 Robert Schumann Berlioz Chopin 1830 Liszt Gottschalk Clara Wieck Schumann Paganini Weber Verdi Wagner
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Romanticism Self-conscious movement in the arts, starting in 1780s-90s Especially inFuential in central-northern Europe Themes: Nature as dark and unexplainable, not rational and orderly ±ascination with the supernatural, uncanny, macabre Renewed interest in the past, especially the distant pre-historical past; renewed interest in “folk” spirit; focus on “national” styles Interest in EXOTIC, IRRATIONAL, SUBLIME Art is generated through “heightened consciousness” in dreams, visions, hallucinations (potentially drug-induced) Aesthetic focus on uniqueness of individual and on idea of struggle, searching; romantic [male] hero, struggling with and within nature Women linked with nature, religion (= irrational); idealized woman’s role as inspiration / foil for romantic hero
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Nationalism Nation : group of people deFned by a language or ethnicity State : geographic territory deFned by ofFcial governing body Nationalism : belief that allegiance to nation supersedes all others
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Nationalism Cultural Nationalism Romanticism: authentic self-expression in art Nationalism: individual as representative of nation Authentic romantic artist is a representative of the nation to which he belongs Nationalism in Music Use of national symbols: language, folk music, national stories Integration into international genres
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An example of “national” romanticism in German musical drama: C. M. von Weber, Der Freischütz (The Magic Bullet), 1821 The Story: Max , a young hunter, wants to marry Agathe , daughter of the town leader Max needs to win a shooting contest to win Agathe, but his marksmanship has been poor; he fears he will lose her Max is approached by Caspar , another hunter, who offers him some magic bullets which never miss their mark Caspar is actually in league with the demon Samiel ; he has promised his soul, and now needs someone to take his place Caspar tells Max to meet him in the “Wolf’s Glen” at midnight so that they can cast the magic bullets Unlike the Italian tradition (sung throughout), German musical drama has spoken dialogue alternating with songs/choruses. Orchestra is often used to reinforce spoken dialogue ( melodrama ) and/or “paint” the dramatic situation. How does the orchestra “paint” the imagery suggested by the stage directions, especially in the last part of this scene?
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Musical theater (Opera) is still the most popular and widespread type of music in the 1800s German tradition: relies less on beautiful tunes and more on dramatic intensity plots are often stories of supernatural or “folk” stories extensive use of orchestral effects to set the mood
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This note was uploaded on 04/26/2010 for the course MUSC 1300 taught by Professor Malone during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Fall09_Week10-summary - Music and Nation MUS 302L Week 10...

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