PETE 394 Lab 2 C - PETE 394 Reservoir Mechanics Lab Lab...

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PETE 394 Reservoir Mechanics Lab Lab Experiment No. 2 Determination of Porosity, Grain Density and Gas Permeability of a Core Sample UL Department of Petroleum Engineering Date Preformed: January 30, 2006 Date Submitted: May 8, 2006 Submitted to Dr. Okoye ________________________ Carl J. Barbier
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Barbier, Carl J. Determination of Porosity, Grain Density and PETE 394 Gas Permeability of a Core Sample Experiment No. 2 Performed: 1/30/06 Submitted: 5/8/06 Table Of Contents Page I Objective 3 II Synopsis 3 III Apparatus 5 IV Procedure 6 V Tabulated Summary of Results 7 VI Discussion of Results 10 VII References 10 2
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Determination of Porosity, Grain Density and PETE 394 Gas Permeability of a Core Sample Experiment No. 2 Performed: 1/30/06 Submitted: 5/8/06 I. Objective To determine porosity, grain density and gas permeability of a core sample by use of a permeameter. Also a porosimeter was used to yield accurate grain volume for the sample. By finding the grain volume, the porosity can be calculated. This information provides a basis from which reservoir analysis can be initiated. II. Synopsis The rock properties (permeability and porosity) are necessary for analyzing a formation to see if will viably produce hydrocarbons. The rock porosity (Figure 1) gives an indication of the volume of hydrocarbon that could possibly be stored within the voids. Porosity fraction is defined as the ratio of the pore volume to the bulk volume of the rock sample. Pore volume is the void space in the rock. Bulk volume is the volume that the rock occupies, sometimes called matrix volume. Bulk volume is usually determined by callipering or by displacement. Grain volume is the volume of the rock grains or solids. Moreover the more uniform (shape and position) the sand grains are and the greater the volume of the pore spaces, the greater the volume of HC will possibly be. The permeability, however, is required for a porous zone to be a producible reservoir. Closely related to the porosity, permeability is the ability of formation fluids to flow through the rock matrix, and if the HC cannot flow to the well bore, there will not be producible reservoir. Henri Darcy empirically defined fluid flow in porous media in 1856 as being proportional to the differential pressure per unit length. The relationship was derived from data collected during a series of experiments on the vertical flow of water through gravel packs. Subsequent work has proved the validity of Darcy’s Law for flow in all directions and confirmed the experimental observations by derivation from the basic laws of physics. 3
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PETE 394 Lab 2 C - PETE 394 Reservoir Mechanics Lab Lab...

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