Hashing-Advanced

Hashing-Advanced - Lecture 24 Advanced Hashing PIC 10B Todd Wittman Note We'll end 10 minutes early today for evaluations Hash Table Choices Hash

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1 Lecture 24: Advanced Hashing PIC 10B Todd Wittman Note: We'll end 10 minutes early today for evaluations. Hash Table Choices s Hash tables are a very powerful data structure, but unlike the other containers we've studied they have parameters / choices of methods that need to be determined. s How many buckets M should we use? b More buckets = More memory = Faster run-time s What hash function should we use? b A hash function has 2 basic steps. b First we need to map the key to a (large) integer x. s e.g. we could add up the ASCII values of the chars in a string b Second we need to convert the integer x to an index in the range [0,M-1] s Division Method : x%M s Multiplication Method : (int) M * ( A*x - (int) (A*x) )
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2 Choosing the Number of Buckets s To choose the number of buckets, you have to ask: b How fast do searches need to be? b How much memory do I have available? s In our example for 14 students at Jedi Academy, it takes a large number of buckets to get down to zero collisions. s Can you modify our program so that it finds the smallest number of buckets needed for 0 collisions? Choosing the Hash Function s First we need to decide how to convert the key to an integer x. s Preferably a large integer bigger than the # buckets M, so we don't map to just one part of our table. s For strings, we added up the ASCII values of each character. for (int i=0; i < s.length(); i++) x += (int) s[i]; s But with this method, the order of the characters does not matter. So permutations map to the same integer. H("Yoda") = H("odaY") s A common solution is to weight the chars. For example, we could fix a constant 1<B<2 and compute for (int i=0; i<s.length(); i++) x += (int) pow(B,i) * s[i];
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3 Choosing the Hash Function s After we have an integer x, we need to restrict it to the range [0,M-1]. s There are 2 popular methods for doing this. s Division Method : Take x mod the # of buckets index = x % M s Multiplication Method : Fix a constant 0<A<1. Then take the fractional part of A*x and multiply that by M. Then round the result down to the nearest integer. index = (int) M * ( A*x - (int) (A*x) ) s The value of A needs to be set experimentally. Knuth recommends: s Can you modify our program so that it uses the multiplication method? (Note you are asked to do this for HW9.) 2 1 5 - = A Are Hash Tables Used in Real
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2010 for the course PIC 157-051-20 taught by Professor Wittman during the Winter '10 term at UCLA.

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Hashing-Advanced - Lecture 24 Advanced Hashing PIC 10B Todd Wittman Note We'll end 10 minutes early today for evaluations Hash Table Choices Hash

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