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2/2/2020Brandy Michelle HorneAssignment 3Project & Change Management INFS-724
B r a n d y M . H o r n eP a g e | 1Question 1ProjectApproachProject ApproachDefinitionProject Approach Defining CharacteristicsFunctionalOrganizationA Functional Organization project approach is when ‘one functional area plays a dominant rolein completing the project…a high-ranking manager in that area is given the responsibility of coordinating the project (Larson & Gray, 2017, p. 69). In a functional organization, where projects include more than one department, ‘the development of the project is divided into segments and assigned to relevant functional groups with the heads of each functional group responsible for their segment of the project’ (Larson & Gobeli, 1989, p.119). Upper management oversees all aspects of the projectwith a project 'report out' done through regular office meetings.There are several advantages to the functional organization project approach. First, each project or project segment is managed and completed in the segment's functional area. Thisapproach is beneficial because 'in-depth expertise can be brought to bear on the most crucial aspects of the project' (Larson & Gray, 2017, p.69). The functional organization also allows for project flexibility without changes in the organizational structure. Flexibility is a benefit since employees can serve as project team members temporarily without too much change to their daily operations. The resultof this flexibility paves the way for a smoother transition back to normal operations post project completion. The drawback of using a functional organization project approach is that it creates silos in addition to enabling a ‘not my department/segment’ mentality. Most strategic projects encompass more than one department. Each department focused on its segment of the project can be disadvantageous to the business. Even though upper management is coordinating project activities with functional managers reporting back to upper management, management does not know if the project could be more robust if the functional areas were working together. For example, marketing is working on a project to automate workflows with their product suppliers. In conjunction, IT is working on another project to automate loading new products into a system. Both projects are supporting the business strategy to create a customer e-commerce tool. If marketing and IT knew what the other was doing and (at a minimum) reported out to each other throughout the project, there could be one automated process to receive a supplier product and load it into the system. Without communication and information
B r a n d y M . H o r n eP a g e | 2transparency, two different processes will be created and mostlikely not able to connect seamlessly. This 'broken process' results in more time and money spent toward another project automating the aforementioned processes.

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