Jane Eyre .docx - 1 Ashley Rodriguez Professor Hill-Miller...

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Ashley Rodriguez Professor Hill-Miller April 29 th , 2019 English 12 Jane Eyre Term Paper Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre truly transcends boundaries and highlights a woman coming into her own and defying societal expectations. Bronte emphasizes that it is not where you came from that defines you but rather how you define yourself. The main character Jane has spent her whole life in suffering and has tried to break free from the low expectations that she has always been associated with. Throughout the entire duration of the novel Jane has been faced with nothing but hardship and has managed to have faith in herself to preserver. It is not until Jane meets Edward Rochester that she finally encounters a male figure who is willing to allow Jane to be an equal. Their love develops rapidly and is budding with sexual tension. Rochester on the outside appears to be Jane’s complete opposite in the sense of societal standards. Jane and Rochester evoke a burning desire for one another and bring out a different side of one another. They both seem to come alive when they are united. Although the novel is not technically an Autobiography, the reader follows Jane’s life and experiences that come along with transitioning into adulthood. Bronte discusses the crippling effects of loving someone and acknowledges how it can affect your own self growth and development. Falling in love brings out raw passions and desires but can also be so blinding that one loses sight of themselves. Jane is not new to hardships. From a very young age she has been passed along to the hands of different caretakers and has been deprived of love or any feelings. Growing up as an 1
orphan her childhood is nothing short of miserable and lacks any resemblance of a normal loving family unit. Jane is always casted as an intruder to other people’s family dynamic and is constantly told that she is a horrible child. Despite being locked in the red room or shipped off to an all-girls school, Jane never loses sight of herself. Jane has suffered by the hands of many and is often used as a punching bag for the other person’s insecurities and emotions. Rather than being filled with rage and hatred, Jane uses her struggles as a source of motivation. She understands that one day those who do her wrong will atone to their sins at some point in life. Jane does not cast judgement onto others and accepts the fact that certain things are out of her hand. It is her high level of self-worth and confidence that pushes Jane to continue bettering herself. Bronte deliberately mentions certain parts of Jane’s youth such as her stay with her Aunt Ms. Reed, the Lowood School, and Thornfield Hall as turning points for some sort of life lesson that Jane will take with her for the rest of her life. We are shaped by our experiences and have the power to control how we channel those experiences. Jane remains a strong and confident character even as she begins to experience womanhood. Her individualism is what consistently sets her apart from those around her. “You are a dependent, mama says; you have no money;

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