Chapter 2

Chapter 2 - Freedom for All Freedom for All “The American...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Freedom for All Freedom for All “The American people simply did not believe or understand that freedom of thought or expression means equal freedom for the other person, especially the one with hated ideas.” ­­ Leonard W. Levy 2 Colonial America Colonial America Control of content Blasphemous libel Seditious libel Control of printing 3 Constitution Constitution Protecting liberties Writ of habeas corpus No titles of nobilities Crimes must be tried by juries Punishment of treason has limitations A republican form of government is guaranteed to every state No religious test as a qualifier for holding office 4 Bill of Rights Bill of Rights James Madison First draft Purpose 10 Amendments ratified 5 Freedom of Speech Freedom of Speech Constitution/Bill of Rights flexibility Early issues International affairs The Civil War The feminist movement The growth of publishing Post­Civil War moral crusades Bad tendency 6 Controlling Communicators Controlling Communicators Aliens, women and slaves Alien Enemies Act Women’s rights Slaves 7 Control of Content Control of Content What is freedom of speech? Sedition Act 1798 Justice Brennan Civil War Espionage Act 1917 & 1918 8 Private Libel Private Libel Expansion of laws State intervention Pitfalls First Amendment’s role 9 Blasphemy/Obscenity Blasphemy/Obscenity Church v. State Commonwealth v. Sharpless Kansas obscenity statute Walt Whitman 10 Media Constraints Media Constraints Three main issues: Copyright decision Mailing restrictions Electronic advancements 11 ...
View Full Document

Page1 / 11

Chapter 2 - Freedom for All Freedom for All “The American...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online