Property II Outline - PropertyIIOutline I.NuisanceLaw...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Property II Outline I. Nuisance Law A. Public v. Private 1. Public Nuisance -An unreasonable interference with a right common to  the general public, including activities injurious to the  health, safety, morals, or comfort of the public.   -Actions can only be brought by a public official. 2. Private Nuisance -An unreasonable substantial non-possessory  interference with the use or enjoyment of another’s  land *A nuisance can be both public and private.  Example is  an industrial plant emitting toxic chemicals into the air. B. Principles of Private Nuisance 1. Nuisance v. Trespass -Noise, vibrations, fumes, and light can sometimes be  treated as trespass instead of nuisance when there is  an obstacle to the nuisance doctrine providing  recovery 2. Test for Private Nuisance (balancing test) 1. Gravity of harm to Plaintiff a. Degree and duration of the harm b. Character or type of harm c. P’s burden of avoiding the harm d. Aspects of P’s use and enjoyment i. Social value ii. Suitability to character of the area 2. Utility of Defendant’s Conduct 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
a. Social Value b. Suitability to character of the area c. Impracticability of avoiding or preventing the  harm *Context makes all the difference, including location,  time, and intensity. 3. Exception: “Coming to the Nuisance” -First in time, first in right concept *The property owner complaining of the nuisance does  not have a claim if the nuisance existed there first. 4. Access to Sunlight Policies a. Historically, England had a doctrine of ancient lights. b. Now, claims cannot generally be made for blocking  sunlight. c. Courts will use policy to make decisions on access to  sunlight, and will weigh the importance of P’s access  against the conduct of D. C. Remedies 1. Injunction—historical choice of remedy -Not used much anymore because courts would  decide that D’s economically valuable activity was not  a nuisance so they didn’t have to grant an injunction 2. Creative Remedies a. Permanent Damages—basically forces D to buy out  the neighbor b. Conditional Injunction—shut down or pay  permanent damages c. Injunction + Damages—used in situations of “coming  to the nuisance” D. Coase Theorem 2
Background image of page 2
-It doesn’t matter what the rule is, because two neighbors  will bargain to the most efficient outcome. -Whoever it is more valuable to remain will buy out the  other. -Only works with the following conditions:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 35

Property II Outline - PropertyIIOutline I.NuisanceLaw...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online