RedAssigh3[1].4 - Unit: Techniques of Integration Module:...

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Unit: Techniques of Integration Module: Introduction to Integration by Partial Fractions Finding Partial Fraction Decompositions www.thinkwell.com info@thinkwell.com Copyright 2001, Thinkwell Corp. All Rights Reserved. 1546 –rev 06/13/2001 Decomposing a rational expression into partial fractions produces an equivalent expression that is usually easier to integrate. Break up difficult rational functions by following these two steps: 1. Write the function as the sum of fractions with unknown numerators. 2. Solve for the unknown numerators. Here is a tricky integral. Notice that the integral can’t be solved with any of the techniques you have learned so far. There is no way to make a u -substitution, and the integral can’t be broken up by trig identities since it doesn’t involve trig expressions. In fact, the only thing you can do to the integrand is factor out an x . This integrand is an example of a rational expression . In general, rational expressions can’t be integrated by
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2010 for the course MATH 172 taught by Professor Hyon during the Spring '10 term at Community College of Denver.

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RedAssigh3[1].4 - Unit: Techniques of Integration Module:...

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