Fourth Amendment

Fourth Amendment - Zak Murdock The Fourth Amendment of the...

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Zak Murdock 10-17-06 The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution was added to the Bill of Rights as a response to the writs of assistance. Under the Fourth Amendment citizens obtain the right against unreasonable searches and seizures, as well as the right against arrest without probable cause. The Fourth Amendment is what prevents police brutality by giving the citizens the right against arrest without a probable cause. The Fourth amendment is a very important one, for it prohibits physical arrests and force by the police without a cause, and it also prohibits the searching and siezing of ones home and personal property. There is a certain rule that acts as a control over police behavior and specifically focuses on the failure of officers to obtain warrants for their arrests, searches, and seizures. This rule is known as the exclusionary rule, and it helps to enforce the Fourth Amendment among the law enforcement world. The exclusionary rule states that evidence seized by the police without a warrant cannot be used in a trial.
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2010 for the course PHYSICS 213 taught by Professor Padamsee during the Spring '10 term at Cornell.

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Fourth Amendment - Zak Murdock The Fourth Amendment of the...

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