Insanity - Zak Murdock 10-2-06 The insanity defense is...

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Zak Murdock 10-2-06 The insanity defense is based on claims of mental illness or mental incapacity. It has very little to do with psychological or psychiatric understandings of mental illness. Although the insanity defense is not used quite often, it did not always exist. Before the existence of the insanity defense, those who were considered insane and committed crimes were tried and sentenced as a normal person would be. However, this changed after Daniel M’Naghten, of Scotland, became the first person to be found not guilty for the reason of insanity. The M’Naghten rule was not so much a product of the trial, it was rather the name given by English judges to the criteria necessary for a finding of insanity. The M’Naghten rule asks whether the defendant knew what he or she was doing or whether the defendant knew that what he or she was doing was wrong. Along with the M’Naghten rule, the Durham rule is another rule for gauging insanity. The Durham rule states that a person is not criminally responsible for his or her behavior if the person’s
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2010 for the course PHYSICS 213 taught by Professor Padamsee during the Spring '10 term at Cornell.

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Insanity - Zak Murdock 10-2-06 The insanity defense is...

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