Homework2

Homework2 - 2. Yes, the internal format for POP3 mailboxes...

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Kevin Deggelman 803 463 734 CS 118 Homework 2 1. The minimum number of round trips required to send a simple mail message is 6. a. First, the SMTP client sends HELO followed by its hostname and then the server responds with a 250 response. b. Second, the SMPT client sends MAIL FROM followed by the specific email address of the sender, and then the server responds with a 250 response. c. Third, the SMPT client sends RCPT TO followed by the specific email address of the recipient, and then the server responds with a 250 response. d. Fourth, the SMPT client sends DATA, and then the server responds with a 354 response. e. Fifth, the SMPT client sends a 7-bit ASCII message that is terminated with CRLF.CRLF, and then the server responds with a 250 response. f. Sixth, the SMPT client sends QUIT, and the server responds with a 221 response.
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Unformatted text preview: 2. Yes, the internal format for POP3 mailboxes is standardized. The reason is that all clients know the exact format to retrieve and delete messages. 3. a. It would take 200 super-leader nodes b. Each leader node should know who its super-leader is, and where its regular nodes are. Each super-leader should know where its leader nodes are. The best search algorithm would be for each node to send its query to its leader node; if the leader node cant find the result in its regular nodes, then it forwards the query to its super node. Once the query is found, the best path should be cleared back to the inquiring node. 4. The upper bound for the number of query messages that are sent through the overlay network is K N, because each time the query message reaches a new peer, the peer-count is decremented....
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2010 for the course CS 118 taught by Professor Chu during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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