PHYSICS 8A-02 (02-18-10) - PHYSICS 8A Professor Joel Fajans...

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PHYSICS 8A Professor Joel Fajans 2/18/10 Lecture 10 ASUC Lecture Notes Online is the only authorized note-taking service at UC Berkeley. Do not share, copy or illegally distribute (electronically or otherwise) these notes. Our student-run program depends on your individual subscription for its continued existence. These notes are copyrighted by the University of California and are for your personal use only. D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. LECTURE Tuesday we began discussing momentum and impulse. I’d like to go over some of that material quickly and highlight some of the important concepts. Basically it started with Newton’s law. We can rewrite it Integrating, we get We give this a name, impulse. The right hand side is easy because the mass is presumably constant. So we get This is a powerful result for problems involving things as hammers, where you don’t know the time history of the force, but don’t necessarily need to know the time. In particular, we can use this method to derive the momentum. By Newton’s third law, we have Regrouping, we get The mass times the velocity is sufficiently important that we define a new quantity, momentum .
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PHYSICS 8A ASUC Lecture Notes Online: Approved by the UC Board of Regents 2/18/10 D O N O T C O P Y Sharing or copying these notes is illegal and could end note taking for this course. 2 This is a powerful statement because it is true only when the external forces are equal to zero. This allows us to find out what happens to the velocity in a number of special cases. One of these cases is where you start with two objects which are initially at rest. The objects are held together by a spring and move away from each other when the spring is released. The conservation of momentum allows us to find out the final velocities. There are other special cases, which we discussed
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2010 for the course PHYSICS 83840p3 taught by Professor Fajans during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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PHYSICS 8A-02 (02-18-10) - PHYSICS 8A Professor Joel Fajans...

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