Chap2_First-Law - Part I: Mechanics Chapter 2 Newton's...

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Chapter 2 Newton’s First Law of Motion Part I: Mechanics
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Aristotle was great philosopher but not such a good physicist. Aristotle’s theory of motion is wrong. Took 2000 years before Galileo got motion right.
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Motion according to Aristotle (I) Every object has a “natural” state. In “natural motion”, “Earth” elements (stone, apple, you, etc.) are drawn to the Earth. Heavier objects are more strongly attracted so they fall faster (stone falls faster than a feather). These are Aristotle’s ideas, but he’s wrong !
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Motion according to Aristotle (II) Pushing or pulling an object causes “unnatural” motion (or “violent” motion). If cause is removed (stop pushing) then object returns to “natural” state and stops moving. BRICK BRICK Pushed brick slides but then comes to a stop…
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Pull of gravity (weight) obviously larger for a big ball than for a small ball. YET the two balls fall
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2010 for the course PHYS 100 taught by Professor Nidhalguessoum during the Spring '10 term at American University of Sharjah.

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Chap2_First-Law - Part I: Mechanics Chapter 2 Newton's...

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