HIV_LAB - Introduction A nurse had broken off a relationship with her doctor seeing that he was still married to his wife She would get her vitamin B

HIV_LAB - Introduction A nurse had broken off a...

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Introduction A nurse had broken off a relationship with her doctor, seeing that he was still married to his wife. She would get her vitamin B shots done by him. AFter she broke it off, she switched up her doctors and stuff. When he realized she wasn’t coming back, knowing her patients had HIV and other STDs and infections, he called her around 10 at night and said he will be giving her her vitamin B shot. He gave it to her and she felt different because it hurt. When she went to dont blood, she tested as HIV positive. She accused the doctor of giving her HIV. He was brought to trial. There was some other evidence that had been ruled out, like having a patient spit splashed on her or the other seven men that she had sexual contact with (But they tested as HIV negative)(NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE, 2013). In this lab we will be creating a phylogenetic tree based off of the victim's blood and the patients blood, comparing them to see the actual result as to how she got HIV. Materials ( ) computer Procedure 1. Go to the NCBI homepage (). On the right toolbar, use the dropdown menu to select Nucleotide (see red arrow in screen capture below) and then search for AY156807. AY156807 is the accession number for a reverse transcriptase gene sequence from an HIV isolate. The accession number is a way to locate or reference the sequence, like a book’s call number in a library card catalog. 2. When you get to the page that opens with all of the record information, look near the top of the page and change the “Display Settings” from GenBank to FASTA. FASTA is a format for DNA sequences that is compatible with programs used for bioinformatics analysis. 3. You will get the complete nucleotide sequence of that particular sequence. Highlight it and copy it (ONLY the sequence, not the blah blah on the first line). Remember, the DNA sequence will only have four different letters representing the four nucleotides (A, T, C, G).
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