Hornellppt - Horrell and Humphries Women's Labour Force Participation and the Transition to the Male-Breadwinner Family 1790-1865 Garrett Smith

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Horrell and Humphries: Women’s Labour Force Participation and the Transition to the Male-Breadwinner Family, 1790-1865 Garrett Smith, Barbara Terrazas, Liana Walks, Ashley Waters
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Women in the Labor Force Women and children participation in labor force often neglected and misrepresented Due to… A lack of empirical evidence in economic records Census didn’t include female participation until the 1850’s Women weren’t represented in every occupation, like men Women and children that assisted in household duties weren’t counted towards labor inputs
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Study 1,781 detailed household budgets from 1787- 1865 Included household consumption, sources of income and expenditures Dataset compiled from contemporary social commentaries, parliamentary papers, local archives and autobiographies
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Study Subset of household budgets used in study Family had to comprise of both husband and wife Husband had to hold a known occupation Data sorted by male occupation and region (reason for bias)
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Women and Industrialization Industrial Revolution created more jobs opportunities… But not necessarily for women Women excluded from well-paying jobs, thus unable to become independent and support a family Still dependent upon husband’s income Decline in female participation??? Increase in employment segregation??? Common idea amongst economic historians, but lacks empirical evidence
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Women and Industrialization Labor inputs were found to differ with occupation, region and time Occupation: ranged from agricultural work to manufacturing to other services Region: urban and rural Time: varied from pre-industrial to industrialization Also mattered whether woman was single or married (single usually meant factory/textile laborer)
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Table 1: Definitions Definition A: Defining participation by the designation of an occupation Definition B: Women with positive earnings Definition C: A and B combined Reliability of source? Men were free to record whatever they would like (3% vs 39%)
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Table 1: Interpreted The occupation definition (A) had lower estimation of participation that the earning definition (B). Especially true for women married to
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2010 for the course ECON 4514 taught by Professor Shuie during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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Hornellppt - Horrell and Humphries Women's Labour Force Participation and the Transition to the Male-Breadwinner Family 1790-1865 Garrett Smith

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