IBM working paper. sink-swim-or-soar

IBM working paper. sink-swim-or-soar - IBM Business...

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IBM Business Consulting Services Executive brief Sink, swim or soar Electronics Services hold the key
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Sink, swim or soar Services hold the key Growth is back Growth is back in Asia Pacific according to the report "Your Turn: The Global CEO Study 2004 - The Asia Pacific Market Viewpoints" by IBM Business Consulting Services. Seven out of ten CEOs in Asia Pacific see new products or services as an area which will offer their companies the greatest opportunity for revenue growth. 1 “Growth is the key strategic objective” 2 for companies in Asia Pacific. Japanese CEOs identified new products and services as the greatest opportunity for revenue growth in the next three years. 3 This is also in line with the findings globally. The global study, which interviewed 456 of the world’s top CEOs (half of which were based in the Asia Pacific region), showed that revenue growth was the number one priority for CEOs over the next several years. 4 China and other parts of Asia were cited by CEOs globally as key to facilitating growth. 5 With customers looking for ever more sophisticated products and services, a key component of capturing growth will be the ability to provide new and clearly differentiated products to the customer. Therefore, what does this mean for Asian electronics companies? How can Asian electronics companies offer a differentiated product or service to the market in order to drive growth? Quality, productivity and innovation In the mid 1980s, manufacturing companies (especially electronic manufacturing companies) embarked on a long and hard journey to drive quality improvement through various initiatives such as Total Quality Management (TQM). Quality was then seen as the competitive edge, as end consumers demanded products that worked as specified. In consumer electronics, product quality has become a strong selling point to consumers and is closely associated with the brand value of the major consumer electronic firms today, no matter where their products are manufactured. Product quality is no longer a differentiator, but a qualifier for the industry. The push for more differentiation has introduced other perspectives of 1 New products/services New markets New channel Customer intimacy Diversif cation 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Figure 1. Opportunity for growth. Percent 78 61 48 43 23 16 42 28 55 64 AP excluding Japan Global Source: “Your Turn: The Global CEO Study 2004 – The Asia Pacif c Market Viewpoints.” IBM Business Consulting Services. 2004.
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2 IBM Business Consulting Services Figure 2. The broader implication of quality. Quality 1980’s Product quality Now Quality of service Quality System quality Product quality Source: IBM Business Consulting Services. quality: system quality (e.g., does not crash, requires no
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2010 for the course ECON 4450 taught by Professor Wan during the Spring '09 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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IBM working paper. sink-swim-or-soar - IBM Business...

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