Gibbons v Ogden

Gibbons v Ogden - Gibbons v. Ogden 1824 I. Facts a. Thomas...

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Unformatted text preview: Gibbons v. Ogden 1824 I. Facts a. Thomas Gibbons was operating a competing ferry service which had been licensed by Congress in regulating the coasting trade. Ogden obtained an injunction from a New York court against Gibbons to keep him out of New York waters, maintaining that navigation was not a distinct form of commerce, and was thus a legitimate area of state regulation. Gibbons then sued for entry into the state, and the case was appealed to the United States Supreme Court. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Gibbons. I I. Legal Questions presented a. Did the State of New York exercise authority in a realm reserved exclusively to Congress, namely, the regulation of interstate commerce? b. I I I. Answers a. The New York law was found invalid because the Commerce Clause of the Constitution designated power to Congress to regulate interstate commerce and that the broad definition of commerce included navigation....
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This note was uploaded on 04/30/2010 for the course PLS 459 taught by Professor Lermack during the Fall '09 term at Bradley.

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Gibbons v Ogden - Gibbons v. Ogden 1824 I. Facts a. Thomas...

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