Economics of Alternative Fertilizers

Economics of Alternative Fertilizers - Economics of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Economics of Alternative Fertilizers Table 3 Cost and Return Analysis of Producing Organic Fertilizer from Solid Waste The Economics of Producing Organic Fertilizer from Solid Waste The economics of organic fertilizer production from solid waste indicate an initial investment of US$4,900. For one cycle (27 to 30 days) with a production of 100 bags, gross sale was US$300 with total expenses of US$113.41. The net income was US$186.59 ( Table 3 .) The initial investment for the MRF, shredding machine and hand tractor can be recovered within 2.68 years. Converting solid waste into organic fertilizer will not only increase farm household income but also become a stable source of organic fertilizer for rehabilitating highly nutrient depleted agricultural soils and reduce environmental pollution generated by improper waste disposal. Fertilizer Economics From 1973 to 1983, the price of natural gas rose almost 500%; the cost of ammonia production rose 300%, and the cost of electricity, which supplies about 20% of the total fertilizer industry’s power requirement, increased over 3.5 times between 1970 and 1980 (Figure 1). The cost of ammonia production rose slightly slower than the price of gas, because the inorganic nitrogen fertilizer plants had the economic incentive to produce more
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Economics of Alternative Fertilizers - Economics of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online