{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture+9 - Poverty and Inequality Second edit Master...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/10/10 Poverty and Inequality Second Lecture
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5/10/10 Poverty Across Regions, 2004
Image of page 2
5/10/10 Poverty in Selected Countries
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5/10/10 Poverty is Concentrated in Rural Areas
Image of page 4
5/10/10 Poverty is Concentrated Among Ethnic Minorities and
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5/10/10 Poverty is Concentrated Among Women and Children The poorest households tend to be female-headed with many children Women’s income-earning potential is lower Children eat but contribute little to household income
Image of page 6
5/10/10 Poverty is Concentrated Among Women and Children Harder to measure: even within a household, women and girls tend to consume less than their share When food is scarce, women are often the ones to go without Girls receive less schooling, less medical care when sick 100 million missing women in Asia Sibling sex in Ghana There is evidence that women and
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5/10/10 The Rise and Fall of Inequality Simon Kuznets: there is a natural tendency for inequality to first increase and then decrease with economic growth: the Inverted-U His explanation was grounded in the Structural Change model of development: Development shifts workers from traditional to modern sector Incomes within each sector stay roughly
Image of page 8
5/10/10 Modern Sector Enlargement
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern