16. Conflict - 16. Conflict in Animal Behavior There's even...

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16. Conflict in Animal Behavior There’s even conflict among researchers in the definition of aggression ! Konrad Lorenz: “the fighting instinct in beast and man which is directed against members of the same species.” Psychologists: “behavior that appears to be intended to inflict noxious stimulation or destruction on another organism.” Behavioral Ecologists: “a form of resource competition, in which an animal actively excludes rivals from some resources such as food, shelter, mates.”
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“Agonistic Behavior” is a more precise term. “A suite of behavior patterns used during conflict with a conspecific, usually indicating whether an individual is going to submit to the other animal or fight if the other does not submit.”
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“Agonistic Behavior” includes all aspects of conflict such as THREATS, SUBMISSIONS, CHASES and PHYSICAL COMBAT, but specifically EXcludes PREDATION. Contexts in which we can find agonistic behavior include: Territorial Dominance Sexual Parental Parent-Offspring Predation (Eating conspecifics)
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2010 for the course BIO 359K taught by Professor Mcclelland during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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16. Conflict - 16. Conflict in Animal Behavior There's even...

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