Lecture 34 - Topics for the day • Exam three review •...

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Unformatted text preview: Topics for the day • Exam three review • Mostly using problems people had trouble with on the practise exam • It is worthwhile checking the homework problems and any other examples I worked in class Exam Three! TODAY 7 - 9 pm, WEL 1.308 NOT this room You will need: non-programmable calculator UT student ID card several #2 pencils and an eraser empty bladder You may not leave before, or start after, 7:45 pm. Once you leave, you may not return. Don’t forget some constants, conversion factors, and atomic weights are on the back of the scantron sheet. Other helpful things are at the top of your exam. Exam Breakdown 10% : Revision topics (Chapters 1-4) 60% : Ideal gas/kinetic theory/non-ideal gases (Chapter 5) 15% : Intermolecular forces (Chapter 16.1) 15%: Properties of liquids (Chapter 16.2) 1 2 3 • Intramolecular forces hold atoms together in molecules (Ionic/covalent) • Intermolecular forces hold atoms or molecules together in condensed phases (liquid/solid) (dipole/dipole, hydrogen bonding, dispersion) • Intermolecular forces are much weaker than intramolecular forces Intermolecular forces • Ion-ion forces hold ionic compounds together in condensed phase. These are coulombic attractions and as strong as ionic bonds. • Ion-dipole forces occur when ionic compounds are dissolved in a polar solvent such as water. • Dipole-dipole forces occur between polar molecules. The more polar the molecule, the stronger the dipole-dipole force. • Dispersion or London forces are present between all molecules and are due to induced instantaneous dipoles that form in the electron clouds. • Although these forces are the weakest of the intermolecular forces, dispersion forces do increase with polarizability , which is dependent on size of the molecule, delocalization of the electrons, and surface area of the molecule. • Dispersion forces can be stronger than dipole-dipole forces between weakly polar molecules • Dipole-induced dipole forces occur between a nonpolar and a polar molecule. 4 5 6 • A hydrogen bond can only occur between a hydrogen chemical bound to F, O or N, and an atom with a lone pair attached to F, O, or N. They are the strongest of the intermolecular forces. • The larger the Δ EN, the larger stronger the hydrogen bond hydrogen bonds dipole- dipole dispersion ion-ion ion-dipole dipole-induced dipole Increasing interaction strength • The relative ordering of the strength of intermolecular forces is as follows: iClicker Time What would be the most signifcant type oF intermolecular Forces in a liquid sample oF ¡uoroForm (CH¢ 3 ) ? A. dispersion B. hydrogen bonding C. ionic D. dipole-dipole E. covalent CH¢3 is tetrahedral Three C–¢ bonds are strong dipoles C–H bond is weaker dipole which won’t cancel....
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Lecture 34 - Topics for the day • Exam three review •...

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