Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - 1 Attention...

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1 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Dawn Walker Axia College of University of Phoenix
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2 Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a very common childhood neurobiological developmental disorder that is characterized by difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and hyperactivity that presents before the age of seven. This disorder affects males more often than females and can persist into adulthood. In fact, 30 to 50% of those diagnosed with ADHD in childhood continue having symptoms into adulthood. There are three subtypes of ADHD which include: predominantly inattentive, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive, and combined hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive. Most children have the combined type of the disorder. ADHD is classified as a disruptive behavior disorder as well as conduct disorder and antisocial disorder. In normal children, it is normal for them to inattentive, hyperactive, or impulsive sometimes, but for children with ADHD, these behaviors are more severe and occur more often. Children who display symptoms of inattention may be easily distracted, forget things, miss details and frequently switch from one activity to another. They may have difficulty focusing on one thing at a time, become bored with tasks after just a few minutes, and may have difficulty focusing attention on organizing and completing tasks or learning something new. Children who suffer ADHD may also daydream a lot, become easily confused, and seem not to listen when spoken to. They do not process information as quickly as children who do not have the disorder, and they struggle to follow directions. Inattention symptoms are most likely to manifest at about eight or nine years of age and are often lifelong. Hyperactivity symptoms are usually obvious by five years of age and peak in severity between ages seven and eight. The physical symptoms of hyperactivity may include: fidgeting, squirming in their seats, talking nonstop, moving constantly, touching things or people around them, and difficulty doing quiet tasks or activities. Impulsive behaviors can present as: extreme impatience, difficulty
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3 waiting for things that they want, blurting out inappropriately, and often interrupting conversations or other activities. Children with the inattentive subtype may seem spacey or
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2010 for the course HCA 240 taught by Professor Agnessamaniego during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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