Addiction - Addiction Addiction-impaired control, craving...

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Addiction Addiction —impaired control, craving and compulsive use , and continued use despite negative  physical, mental, and/or social consequences Biological predisposition and experience Over-stimulation of natural reward pathways Other rewarded behaviors include sexual excitement, gambling and video games Substance abuse o Maladaptive pattern of substance use leading to clinically significant impairment or  distress o Most recognize it as harmful but continue o Addictive substances increase dopamine activity in certain areas of the brain Pleasure and Reward The Mesolimbic System o  Medial forebrain bundle (MFB) o  Dopamine pathways in addiction and reward:  Almost all abused drugs stimulate dopamine release in the  nucleus accumbens  (NA) —small subcortical area rich in dopamine receptors that is responsible for  feelings of pleasure  Animals self-administer microinjections of addictive drugs into nucleus accumbens  Lesion nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area No drug self-administration No drug reward  DA in NA is increased by self-administration of addictive drugs and natural  reinforcers Sexual excitement, gambling, and video games
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fMRI research indicates dopamine is released during viewing of “attractive” 
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2010 for the course ANTH 1100 taught by Professor Stack,eile during the Fall '08 term at Colorado.

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Addiction - Addiction Addiction-impaired control, craving...

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