Consumerism in the 1920s (2003)

Consumerism in the 1920s (2003) - By Ryan Kusy A modern...

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By Ryan Kusy
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A modern movement for the protection of the consumer against useless, inferior, or dangerous products, misleading advertising, unfair pricing, etc. The theory that a progressively greater consumption of goods is economically beneficial. Courtesy of Dictionary.com
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The price of automobiles dropped and became much more affordable. Millions of people bought cars during this time. New consumer appliances such as washing machines, vacuum cleaners, and refrigerators were created with the addition of public electricity to people’s homes.
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During the 1920s advertising expanded drastically. It started to appeal to the people’s desire of status and popularity. Customers could now buy using credit, which allowed stores to increase the sales of these new appliances as well as automobiles. Chain stores began to flourish. They were able lower prices and put smaller neighborhood businesses out of work.
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In 1913, there were only 1.2 million automobiles
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This note was uploaded on 05/02/2010 for the course ENG 241 taught by Professor Kim during the Spring '10 term at Drexel.

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Consumerism in the 1920s (2003) - By Ryan Kusy A modern...

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