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Running head: THE CASE FOR BICYCLE HELMETS 1 The Case for Bicycle Helmets Student’s Name: Instructor’s Name: Tara Chambers Due Date:
THE CASE FOR BICYCLE HELMETS 2 The Case for Bicycle Helmets The use of bicycles as a mode of transport, as a sporting activity, and for leisure has increased in this age. Particularly, low-income countries record increased reliance on bicycle transport as an order of the day ( World Health Organization, 2006). Besides, developed and emerging markets have also indicated increased use of bicycles among their citizens. Notably, the growth in the use of bicycle is directly proportional to increasing injuries and fatalities among the users due to road accidents. Numerous studies agree that many states have enacted laws requiring all bicycle users to wear helmets ( De Jong, 2012; Karkhaneh, Kalenga, Hagel, & Rowe, 2006). Such a scenario indicates the essence and vitality of bicycle helmets. Nevertheless, various debates exist on the real value and significance of helmets owing to the fact that death and injuries still occur amidst usage of helmets. Arguably, bicycle helmets are safe and ought to be compulsory for users because they are effective in preventing head injuries, in averting death and disability, and in reducing hospital costs. Evidently, bicycle helmets are safe and should be mandatory since they are effective in preventing head injuries. Studies note that it is inevitable for bicyclists to be victims of accidents (Stier et al, 2016). As a result, the proactive measure that is most reliable is to be in use of a helmet. Notably, quality helmets have been manufactured to shield the head of the users in the event of an accident. Similarly, Curnow (2008) affirm that a helmet is apparently the safest form of protection for the head against any external force. Noteworthy, the level of injury to a head that is devoid of a helmet versus the one covered with a helmet is undoubtedly significant. Stier et al. (2016) argue that a minor collision or a fall involving a cyclist is prone to result to serious

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