2009-Survey - Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009...

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Unformatted text preview: Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 CONDITION/ VALUATION SURVEY M/V CORSAIR II Survey commissioned by: Washington, DC 20024 Survey performed by: VESSEL NAME: CORSAIR II HAILING PORT: Washington, DC Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 BUILDER: Richardson Boat Company YEAR BUILT: 1959 MODEL: Golden Anniversary Double Cabin Hard Top Motor Yacht DOCUMENTATION NUMBER: 539185 BUILDER‘S ID: 46MY59102 LOCATION: Aft 0f starboard engine LOCATION: Metal plates on companionway to forward stateroom and inside door over DC electrical panel in saloon. LENGTH (design): 46 ft. GROSS TONS: 29 LENGTH (over all)*: 46 ft. NET TONS: 23 *Includes all appendages such as bow pulpit and swim platform BEAM: 13.9 ft. DEPTH: 7 ft. VESSEL TYPE: Vessel is a twin screw, gasoline inboard powered, hard top cruiser style motor yacht without a flybridge. Vessel's hull was built with cedar planks on cypress frames. The deck is teak that has been covered with Fiberglas. The wood deckhouse has also been covered with Fiberglas. LOCATION OF VESSEL DURING SURVEY: Vessel was surveyed in the water at the vessel’s normal slip at the Washington, DC on April 7th, 8th and 30‘“, 2009. All operational checks were performed in the slip. The vessel was last inspected out of the water by this surveyor at Colton’s Point, MD on August 19, 2002 and portions of that report have been included in this report. No attempt was made to inspect behind liners, fixed cabinetry or other inaccessible areas unless such inspection could be accomplished Without damaging or removing joiner work or cabinetry. This survey was limited to visual observation throughout. SUMMARY: The M/V CORSAIR II is a well maintained vessel that has been continuously modified and upgraded to meet the previous owner's needs as a liveaboard vessel. Maj or modifications include removal of the second aft stateroom aft to allow enlargement of the owners stateroom, raising and extending the hard top to provide adequate headroom in the pilothouse and aft deck as well as enclosing and air conditioning the aft deck. In addition, the vessel has been well maintained structurally, including installation of a new stem, new transom and many planks as well as refastening the hull, rebuilding the cabin top and covering the decks and cabin top with F iberglas. The hull appears to be in very good condition. However, it was noted that over the years several short planks have been installed due to the unavailability of long cedar planks. The use of shorter planks has had two results: a. A reduction in the longitudinal strength of the hull due to the reduction in the number of long planks that can provide longitudinal stiffness. b. Shorter planks mean additional seams where planks butt against each other. There are now some areas where several plank butts fall closer together than normally allowed in wooden boat construction. This also reduces the longitudinal strength of the hull by creating weak points where the plank butts are too close together. See section A3. for details. Mechanical systems have been professionally maintained and most have been upgraded. Recent upgrades include the electrical system and the installation of both a sewage holding tank and a sewage treatment system. Required and recommended actions are Survey of M/V CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 indicated in sections J & K of this report. However, there are no discrepancies that have a significant adverse effect on this vessel's value. When the required actions are complete the yacht will be a good risk for insurance purposes. PRESENT MARKET VALUE*: $30,000 REPLACEMENT VALUE*: $400,000 *See definitions and discussion in section L. A. EXTERIOR A.1. HULL CONSTRUCTION: The hull is constructed of cedar planks on what appears to be steam bent cypress frames. 1 and 1/2 inch wide mahogany floors (thickness above keel is approximately 6 inches at centerline) are bolted to the keel and provide support for the lower portion of the frames. The frames measure 1 and 3/4 inches wide and 1 and 3/8 inches deep. Frame spacing varies, with 6 inch spacing in the engineroom and approximately 9 inch spacing forward and aft of the engineroom. The hull is made with a single layer of 6.5” X 1.125” thick bottom planks and 5.5” X 1” side planks screwed directly to the frames. The transom is made of mahogany planks and the out of water portion has been finished bright. The keel is 3 and 3/4 inch wide and extends 6 inches below the hull forward. The forward portion of the keel is one piece. Further aft the keel is made up of two pieces and extends up to 19 inches below the hull. The lower 4 inches of the keel has been sheathed in copper that is well secured to the hull. Additionally, the hull is reinforced by the forward and aft bulkheads of the engineroom, the forward bulkhead of the space forward of the engineroom (All of which were made of 3/4 inch plywood) and the longitudinal engine foundations. The overall appearance is of a fair and symmetrical hull with no longitudinal hog or sag noted. A2. HULL CONDITION: The vessel was last inspected out of the water by this surveyor on September 30, 2002. The following information was recorded as part of that inspection: Hull was found to be in satisfactory condition. A previous major renovation of the vessel was reportedly completed between 1987 and 1989, including the installation of a new stem, new transom, numerous bottom planks and refastening of the hull. During this haulout the lower two boards of the transom were replaced, two planks at the turn of the bilge in the starboard aft portion of the vessel were replaced and 17 frames behind these planks were sistered with laminated frames built up of 3 layers of]. 75 ” X 5/1 6 ” bent oak that were approximately 40” long. The damage to this area was caused by a longitudinal plank seam that has been leaking for a long time. This leak caused the frames behind the seam to become deteriorated and several had cracked. The horn timbers were also reinforced with three layers of laminated oak. Stem was found to be in excellent condition. Planking is in good condition and no additional planks needed to be replaced at this time. Several seams were recaulked during this haulout but this is considered routine maintenance. The copper sheathing on the keel is in good condition and connected to a zinc Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 that was renewed. 12 fastenings were pulled as part of this inspection and all appeared to be in very good condition and planks seem well secured to the frames. There was evidence of previous repairs on the port side, midship at the turn of the bilge. Several planks were replaced in this area, reportedly 8 years ago. It appears that the wood used was mahogany and not cedar and that it was different dimensions than the original planks. Screw holes in this area were filled with 3M 5200 adhesive rather than wood bungs. This repair is satisfactory, but should be checked closely at future haulouts. Noted a 3 "X3 " copper patch on the starboard side of the bow, forward, just a few planks from the keel. The copper is well secured and surrounding wood appears to be solid. This patch is below the sole of the V-berth and could not be examined internally. This patch was observed five years ago and shows no deterioration or any reason to pull it off to inspect below. Access to the internal structure of the vessel was very limited. The arrangement of the aft stateroom has been modified and the sole in that space was originally installed with no access panels. The recent repairs to the starboard chine required that access openings be cut in the sole, providing good access to the inner portion of the hull. However, access to the port side is still very limited. Tanks outboard of the engines allow limited examination of the area at the turn of the bilge outboard and forward of the engines and structure below the galley and portion from the galley up to the V-berth allowed limited examination of the internal structure in that area. Noted 6 adjacent frames that have been sistered in the port aft portion of the engineroom, in the same area where plank repairs occurred. It appears that a few of the original frames in this area had rotted at the turn of the bilge and that neighboring frames fractured under the increased loads. Sistered frames are acceptable at this time but quality of workmanship is marginal and these repairs should be monitored closely at future haulouts. Noted 5 sistered frames below the V- berth (2 to starboard, 3 to port) and one frame that is starting to fracture at some of the fastenings. This frame is in the same condition that was documented in a 1997 survey and does not appear to be deteriorating. However, this frame should be checked routinely at each haulout. The frame in question is below the V-berth on the starboard side, a few frames aft of the sistered frames previously mentioned. The condition of these areas has not changed since they were first observed. A.3. HULL FINISH (above waterline): Hull was last painted in 2002. Paint is in surprisingly good condition for its age but the hull is clearly overdue for a new paint job. (K.l 1.) There are several areas where the paint has just started peeling. Now that the paint has started cracking at more of the plank seams and butts it has become obvious that at some point in the vessel’s past several long planks were replaced with shorter planks, some of which were less than 5 feet in length. This has undoubtedly reduced the longitudinal strength of the hull, both because the shorter planks are unable to transfer loads throughout a greater length of the vessel and because the ends of these planks now fall closer together than is normally intended in the construction of wood vessels, creating weak points. Although the boatyard that replaced planks prior to 2002 is no longer in buisiness, some of the shiprights who worked there are still available. It appears that when long cedar planks were not available the yard was forced to either replace long cedar planks Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 with mahogany or short cedar planks. The previous owners were an older couple who kept the vessel in the protected waters of the upper Potomac River so it was felt that some reduction in longitudinal strength could be tolerated. Considering that the vessel exhibits no longitudinal sag or hog after all these years and that the 2002 paint job lasted so long before cracks appeared at the plank seams and butts, it appears that there has indeed been minimal flexing of the hull. The following observations were made: a. Starboard side of bow. There is an area of rot developing along the deck edge. b. Starboard side of bow. There are some short planks and too many plank butts too close together. c. Starboard side, midship. The end of one plank is soft between the aft two engineroom vents. (1. Port side of bow. There is an area of rot developing along the deck edge. e. Port side of bow. There are some short planks and too many plank butts too close together. f. Port side, midship. There are some short planks and too many plank butts too close together. See photos attached to this report. The following information on plank lengths and the spacing of plank butts was taken from USCG Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) 7-95, Guidance on Inspection, Repair and Maintenance of Wooden Hulls: 1. Replacement planks should extend at least 6 frame spaces but in no case be less than 5 feet in length. 2. Butts in adjacent planks should be at least 3 frame spaces apart. 3. Butts in the same frame bay should be separated by at least 3 solid strakes. 4. Butts in adjacent strakes should be no closer than 5 feet. If there is a solid strake between them, no closer than 4 feet. 5. Butts should be shifted so that 3 or more do not fall in a diagonal line. Vessel should be resticted to operation in protected waters until such time as repairs can be completed that will replace planks as needed to meet the above guidance. (J .3.) The transom was finished bright but the varnish is in poor condition and could use refinishing. (K. 12.) A.4. DECK: The deck is teak that has been covered with Fiberglas and painted with non-skid paint. There was a 4’ X 4’ area of delamination on the starboard side of the fore deck, between the deckhouse and the fore deck hatch. There were also some small areas of light delamination. No repair is required at this time. There were no indication of leaks. Deck structure appears sound, with both Fiberglas and paint in satisfactory condition. A.5. DECK FILLS/DISCHARGES: Port and starboard fuel tanks each have a fill on the aft deck, near the transom. The deck discharge for the holding tank is on the port side of the deck, midship, just forward of the step in the deck. The fill for the water tanks (one fill for all three tanks) is located on the starboard side, midship, just forward of the step. The shoreside water connection is on the starboard side of the hull, midship. All deck fills are in serviceable condition. A.6. DECK HATCHES: A 19.5" X 19.5" hatch with a 3/4 inch coaming is located in the fore deck and provides an emergency escape from the forward stateroom. A 20" X 20" hatch with Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 3/4" coaming is located in the aft deck, inside the aft deck enclosure, and provides an emergency escape from the aft stateroom. In both cases, the beds provide sufficient support to allow easy use of the escape if needed. A.7. DECKHOUSE/SUPERSTRUCTURE: The cabin top was completely rebuilt in 1996, covered with Fiberglass and then painted. Cabin top appears to be in good condition with no delamination noted. Hardtop of pilothouse was raised in 1996 to provide 73 inches of headroom and the hard top extended aft almost to the transom. The aft deck was enclosed leaving only a small deck aft for line handling duties. The hard top and aft deck enclosure are in very good condition. All windows are in good condition. Wing doors and door to aft deck were well constructed of a single piece of Sintra (expanded PVC) and fitted with windows. The modification of the pilothouse and enclosure of the aft deck was well designed, well constructed and finished so as to appear to be part of the original design. In addition to adding a tremendous amount of living space, this modification has significantly added to the value of the vessel. A.8. FLY BRIDGE: Not applicable. A.9. WOOD TRIM: Handrails and other mahogany trim are in satisfactory structural condition but should be refinished. A mahogany mast is mounted on the cabin top. A.10. HAND HOLDS & TRIM: All well secured and well placed. A1 1. RAILS/LIFELINES: From the wing doors forward, the vessel is encircled by a mahogany rail 32.5 inches above the deck, supported by bronze stanchions and chromed bronze deck fittings. The bow rail is all stainless steel and chromed bronze fittings. The rail was found to be in good condition and all stanchions secure. The aft deck rail is 32 inches high and the area below the rail has been enclosed with Sintra. A.12. SWIM PLATFORM: Not applicable. A.13. CANVAS: The forward saloon windows, pilothouse side windows and pilothouse Windshields are all fitted with matching green sunshade material and were all in satisfactory condition but showing some wear. The side windows of the saloon are covered with green canvas fitted with large plastic windows that are in satisfactory condition. The fore deck hatch is also covered with matching green canvas. All covers were in satisfactory condition but showing some wear. B. SPARS, RIGGTNG AND HARDWARE - Deck cleats are appropriate in size and number and all well secured. C. INTERIOR Survey of M/V CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 C. l. LAYOUT: The vessel interior is normally entered from large wing doors on either side of the vessel. With the exception of a small section of deck at the transom, the aft deck has been fully enclosed. All aft deck furniture is free standing and includes a daybed, 3 freestanding chairs, and end table. There is also a Sanyo 3 cubic foot refrigerator and a 19” Philips Magnavox TV that sits on the refrigerator. The refrigerator is well secured to the deck. The interior of the aft deck enclosure is finished with white Sintra (expanded PVC material) and mahogany trim. The large sliding windows make this a light and airy space. The pilothouse is forward of the wing doors and has a centerline helm station and fixed seat behind the helm, with storage below. Steps to the saloon are forward to starboard. The saloon is down 6 steps down from pilothouse and has a freestanding drop leaf table, 3 freestanding chair and three freestanding cabinets. There is a Sony AM/FM clock radio on the starboard side that does not appear to be operational. The galley is in starboard forward corner of the saloon and has a Princess electric stove with an oven, stainless steel sink and 12 cubic foot refrigerator. 4 steps down from the saloon and forward is the forward stateroom, which has a V-berth configuration, with drawers under the berths, a hanging locker to starboard and head to port. The head has an electric toilet and stainless steel sink and is not fitted with a shower. The V-berth was previously being used as a pantry and there were no mattresses observed. (K. 14.) The aft portion of the vessel originally had two staterooms with twin beds but has been modified so there is now a single full width owner's stateroom with a double bed on centerline aft with freestanding nightstands on each side of the bed and two large freestanding dressers forward. The dressers are not well secured. (J .7.) There are two very large closets and an ensuite head on the port side, forward, with a Vacu-flush toilet, sink and bathtub with shower enclosure. The engineroom is below the saloon and accessed through hatches in the deck. C.2. CONDITION OF INTERIOR: The interior is in generally good condition, especially when you consider the vessel’s age. Joiner work was of good quality and is in generally good condition. Interior wood has all been varnished. The V-berth and forward head have painted walls and varnished mahogany drawers and trim, all of which are in generally good condition. Woodwork in the saloon is all varnished and in generally good condition. The aft stateroom has been remodeled and has new wood panels on the walls with built in storage. Furniture in aft stateroom is in good condition. The following Observations of the vessel’s interior were made: a. V—berth: The paint is beginning to peel. Some of the trim is coming loose and the wood could use refinishing. b. Saloon: There is some water damage to the port aft corner of the aft bulkhead. This appears to be old damage and there does not appear to be any current leakage. There is also some water damage to the hull liner on the starboard side, aft, below the aft end of the saloon window. c. Aft stateroom: The paneling is in satisfactory condition but paneling and painted surfaces all appear to have nicotine stains. Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 No repairs of the above areas are required. Pilot house interior is in good condition, although there were some water stains below the starboard windshield. Interior of aft deck enclosure is also in good condition. Condition of sole and headliner are discussed in sections C5. and C6. C3. BALLAST: None observed. C.4. HULL TO DECK JOINT: Structure of this vessel makes it impossible to observe this joint in the forward half of the vessel but the space above the ports in the aft half of the vessel has been left open and the hull to deck joint is easily visible. There is no indication of any problem with this joint, other than the rott mentioned in section A3. C5. SOLE: Interior deck sole was found to be 5/8 inch plywood in good condition. Wood parquet flooring has been installed in the saloon, galley and aft stateroom. Some of the parquet in the forward stateroom is coming loose. (K.15.) The saloon also has area rugs in addition to the parquet flooring. Noted that the saloon has distortion in the sole at the aft end of the engine hatches and that the sole of the aft stateroom has a transverse hog in it and some parquet is coming loose. (K.16.) The heads both have vinyl flooring. The Vinyl flooring in the forward head was in satisfactory condition but the Vinyl flooring in the aft head is coming loose. (K.17.) C.6. HEADLIN ER: A Vinyl headliner was used in all spaces below deck. These headliners are all in good condition but most are stained by cigarette smoke. (K. 1 8.) Some overhead trim is missing. (K.20.) The ceiling of the aft deck enclosure was made with Sintra, trimmed with mahogany and is in good condition. There is some edidence of minor water damage in the overhead of the aft deck, but no repairs are required. One section of trim and Sintra need t be redecured above the port side of the helm. (K.19.) C.7. UPHOLSTERY: All was in satisfactory condition. C.8. VENTILATION: Good throughout vessel. All below deck spaces are fitted with opening portlights. Large sliding windows are fitted on both sides of saloon and galley. Large sliding windows on both sides of the pilothouse and aft deck. D. NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT D.1. LOWER HELM STATION EQUIPMENT: Operation of wheel and controls satisfactory. Gauges include tachometer, engine water temperature, engine lure oil pressure and ammeters for both engines and all operated properly. There are two fuel gauges on the port side of the helm that both operated satisfactory (the switch is above the gauges). There are keyed ignition switches and start buttons for both engines. Each of 3 Windshields is fitted with a wiper, but only the starboard wiper was operational. (K.10.) The following electronic and navigation equipment was observed: Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 5 inch Gemini magnetic compass Satisfactory, but deviation table not observed. Standard Horizon 50 series VHF Satisfactory. Apelco XCD350 fish/depth finder Satisfactory. Flashing type engine synchronizer Not tested. Atco Portable 12 volt spotlight Satisfactory. Explosive vapor detector Not operational. (K.6.) D.2. UPPER HELM STATION EQUIPMENT: Not applicable. D.3. SPOTLIGHT: A 12 volt portable electric spotlight plugs in on the port side of the helm station. Operation was satisfactory. E. GALLEY E. 1. FRESH WATER SYSTEMS: The vessel is equipped with three water tanks. There are two cylindrical galvanized tanks located on the starboard side of the engineroom that were original tanks. Both water tanks are well secured. However, it has been reported that the lower tank developed a leak several years back and it has been disconnected from the system and isolated. The upper tank appeared to be in satisfactory where it could be examined. Capacity of the single tank is approximately 50 gallons. A new 50 gallon plastic water tank has been installed on the port side of the engineroom, outboard of the port engine. This tank is well secured. A l2-volt Flow-jet fresh water pressure pump is located in the space forward of the engineroom, to port. A 19.9 gallon, 110 volt Vanguard electric water heater is located in the port forward corner of the engineroom. The water heater is properly secured and is fitted with a proper relief valve. Plastic hose and copper tubing are used for hot and cold water lines throughout vessel. All sinks drain directly overboard by gravity. Aft shower drains to a sump located below the sole just forward of the tub and is then pumped overboard. The systems were all tested and no leaks discovered. The dockside water connection is located on the starboard side of the hull, midship. E.2. STOVE: Princess three burner electric stove with oven. Installation and operation satisfactory. The safety switch for the stove cover tested satisfactory. E.3. REFRIGERATION: A relatively new Kenmore 110 volt refrigerator/freezer of approximately 12 cubic feet has been installed. It is well secured in place. Both doors have been fitted with a latch to secure the door in heavy weather. Operation of the refrigerator was satisfactory. E.4. OTHER: None. F. ELECTRICAL F. 1. BATTERIES: The vessel is equipped with two 8-D 12 volt Deka batteries in plastic battery boxes (with covers) located in the port forward corner of the engineroom, directly in front of the Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 port engine. Both of these battery boxes are secured so they can not slide and are well secured vertically. Disconnect switches are located at the fuel manifold on the forward engineroom bulkhead, on centerline. The batteries are several years old and it is doubtful that the previous owner was diligent about keeping them topped off with water during the last years of her life, so I would anticipate the need to replace them in the near future. (K.9.) The generator draws power from the starboard battery. A Professional Mariner Pro-tech 4 battery charger is located on the aft bulkhead of the space just forward of the engineroom and appears to be operating properly. F.2. GENERATOR: An Onan gasoline powered generator is located in the starboard forward comer of the engineroom. The data plate is missing but the unit appears to be a 6 kW generator. there is no hour meter. The generator is fresh water cooled and has a wet exhaust with a steel Onan waterlift muffler. The muffler appears to be in good condition and is located forward of the generator with the exhaust discharging above the waterline to starboard. All hoses and belts were satisfactory. Fuel to the generator is supplied via USCG type Al hose that connects to the main fuel system at the outlet of the starboard primary fuel filter (i.e.: generator and starboard fuel filter both draw from the starboard tank via the starboard filter under normal operation) and a secondary filter is located at the generator. The generator has not been operated in recent years. The generator turned over freely but would not start. Investigation by the buyer revealed that the generator was not getting fuel and her proceeded to clean the fuel lines and replace the fuel filters. He managed to get the generator to fire and operate as long as an external source of fuel was provided, but the engine will still not run on its own. The generator was not operated under load. Observed that there was a noisy bearing or pulley during the attempts to start the generator and it appears likely that there is a problem with the fuel pump or carburetor but it appears likely that the generator can be made operational with reasonable effort. (K.2.) Effective separation of generator output and shore power is provided by a rotary selector switch at the AC panel on the starboard side of the saloon which only allows the distribution panel to draw power from a single source. F.3. SHORE TIE: The vessel has both a 50 amp, 250 volt shore power system and a 30— amp/ 125—volt shore power system. Both shore power receptacles are located in the starboard side of the hull, midship at the step in the deck and are fitted with proper screw down covers. A 50 amp double throw main breaker is used on the 50 amp system and a 30-amp double throw main breaker is used on the 30-amp system. These main breakers are located above the assessory panel which is aft of the main AC distribution panel. There is a three position switch aft of the assessory panel that allows it to draw power from either the 30 amp shore power receptacle or the main AC panel. The 50-amp shore power system has a standard rotary selector switch. Telephone and cable TV shore tie plugs are located adjacent to the AC shore tie. Observed no reverse power indicator for the 30-amp shore power system, although it could be an audible alarm. (J .5.) All else was was found to be satisfactory and in compliance with current ABYC recommendations. F.4. ELECTRIC PANELS: There are two AC distribution panels of the dead front type located on the starboard side of the saloon. The main AC panels is an older Cutler Hammer unit that may have been original but was probably an earlier upgrade and the other is relatively new 10 Survey of WV CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 Professional Mariner panel. In both cases, circuit protection is provided by thermal circuit breakers and all connections are of the screw down type. All breaker sizes appear appropriate for wire sizes used. All circuits are well labeled. The main panel has a rotary switch (forward, with DC panel in cabinet) to select either the 50-amp shore power system or the generator. The newer panel can be powered from either the main AC panel or the 30 amp shore power system and isolation of the potential power sources is provided by a three position switch. The ammeter and voltmeter for the AC systems (with switches to allow use with either leg of the SO-amp system) is located with the DC panel in the cabinet. The 12 volt distribution panel is located just forward of the AC distribution panels. This is a dead front panel with circuit protection provided by thermal circuit breakers. All connections were of the screw down type. All breaker sizes are appear appropriate for wire sizes used. The DC panel has a voltmeter and selector switch to check either main engine battery, Both AC and DC panels have been upgraded significantly and appear to be in full compliance with all current ABYC recommendations, with the following exceptions: a. Lack of reverse power indication for the 30-amp shore power system. (J .5.) b. No GFI protection for the llO-volt outlets in the heads and galley. (J .6.) Neither of these requirements existed when this vessel was built but the electrical systems have been upgraded enough that they should have been brought into full compliance with current standards. F.5. WIRING/LIGHTING: Stranded cable used throughout vessel. Most wiring has been installed in recent years and is standard boat cable. No dead end cables were observed. Wiring appears to be of adequate size and is well secured. It appears that wiring of vessel has been upgraded several times in the vessel's life and each upgrade has been done well. Even oldest wiring observed was in good condition and installed in accordance with current standards. Lights throughout the vessel operated properly. See comment in section F.4. concerning lack of GFI protection. F.6. BONDING AND LIGHTNING PROTECTION: Through hull fittings are not connected to a bonding system. The fuel fills are bonded to the tanks. Unable to test if tanks were effectively bonded to the engines but bonding wires for that purpose were observed. G. PROPULSION - G.l. ENGINES: Vessel is equipped with two raw water cooled, 8 cylinder, Chrysler Marine Hemi engines. The port serial number is L7102 and the starboard is R7104. Engines appear to be original. No hour meters were observed. There are no strainers in the raw water inlet lines. The engines started easily and ran well with little smoke in the exhaust. Only a small amount of cooling water gets injected into the exhaust until the engines warm up enough to open the thermostats. Sufficient cooling water was observed but it appears likely that the raw water pump impellers have not been replaced in the recent past. (K.8.) The engines were operated at idle speed until the engines warmed up and the following readings were observed: 11 Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 Port Starboard RPM 600 600 Oil Pressure 40 45 Temperature 165 160 Ammeter 0+ 0+ The engines were briefly operated under load at idle speed but only long enough to move the vessel between slips. Both engines operated smoothly, with no hesitation. G.2. REDUCTION GEAR: Identification had been painted over and could not be read. Transmissions were operated during this inspection and both shifted smoothly into forward and reverse. G.3. V-DRIVES: Not applicable. G.4. BELTS & COOLING SYSTEM: All drive belts in satisfactory condition. All water hoses on engines are in satisfactory condition. Adequate flow of raw water was noted in the exhaust of both engines, although it would be wise to change the impellers in the raw water pumps as discussed in section G. 1. G5. EXHAUST SYSTEM: Wet exhaust systems. Risers, connecting pipes and all hoses appeared to be in satisfactory condition where observed. Most of the exhaust system is metal, with only short sections of rubber hose. G.6. CONTROLS: Double lever throttle/shift cable controls operate freely. Keyed ignition switches, start and stop buttons all operate satisfactory. G.7. SHAFT LOGS, CUTLASS BEARINGS, SHAFTS, STRUTS AND PROPELLERS: The following was recorde following the September 30,2002 out of water inspection of the vessel: Vessel has a pair of 23 "X 25 " three blade, bronze propellers on 1.5 inch bronze shafts. Propellers and shafts were both in good condition. Some wear was noted in the cutlass bearings but considering the little use the vessel gets the existing cutlass bearings could be satisfactory for years. In 1997 I recommended that plans should be made to renew the cutlass bearings at the next haulout. However, there seems to have been little wear in the intervening years and the amount of wear was still found to be acceptable. Both shafts were protected by shaft zincs that were in satisfactory condition. Each shaft is supported by an I-strut at the propellers and an additional I-strut between there and the shaft log, all of which were bronze and in good condition. A pair of 23 "X 25 ” three blade propellers in good condition were found stowed under the helm seat. Rudders are bronze and appear to be in good condition. Both were protected by zincs that were in satisfactory condition. There was a small amount of torsional play between the rudders and it appeared that this was due to either play where the tiller arm connects to the rudder shaft or 12 Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 where the rod connecting the two tiller arms actually connects to the tiller arms. The aft cabin of the vessel has been modified from its original condition (there is now an island double rather than the original twin beds) and it is now very diflicult to examine the steering system. The starboard side was examined and minimal play was found where the tie rod connects to the tiller arm. The connections observed were all fitted with cotter pins. An air conditioner and some joiner work on top of the port steering gear prevented examination of that side of the steering system. Considering the amount of play between the rudders and small amount of play noted on the starboard side, it is estimated that there is less than 1/8 inch of play in the connection (i. e. : the holes in the tiller arm and connecting rod are each "slotted" approximately [/16 inch, indicating a loss of 1/32 of an inch from each side of each hole) that cannot be observed and that this has not weakened the components of the system enough to require correction at this time. However, access to the top of the port rudder post should be provided to allow examination of the components of the steering system so repairs can be made prior to any chance of a system failure. (K. 3. ) Bronze engine exhausts were in good condition and well secured to the transom. G.8. FUEL TANKS: Original aft fuel tanks have been replaced in 1994 with two 133 gallon independent aluminum tanks located below the bed in the aft stateroom. Fuel fill hoses are USCG type A1 non-metallic hoses and fuel fills are bonded to the fuel tanks. Vent lines could not be observed but fuel vents are located on the transom (low) and are fitted with screens in satisfactory condition. G.9. FUEL SYSTEM: USCG type A1 non metallic fuel hose was used for all fuel lines in the engineroom. Primary fuel filtration is by Sierra water separating filters for each engine, with secondary paper element filters at each engine. Original mechanical fuel pumps have been replaced with electric fuel pumps. Twin 2 barrel carburetors are all fitted with backfire flame arrestors. Approval numbers were not observed on the backfire flame arrestors (not required at time of construction) but they appear to be of an approved type. H. AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT H.1. SEACOCKS: All seacocks are bronze and were not bonded, although found to be in good condition. 10 through-hulls and transducers were located below the waterline, as follows: Description Internal location 1. IUW inlet for forward toilet Below deck in storage space fwd of the engineroom. 2. Sewage discharge for forward toilet Below sink in forward head. 3. Depth finder transducer Below deck in storage space fwd of the engineroom. 4. R/W inlet for air conditioners Below deck in storage space fwd of the engineroom. 13 Survey of WV CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 5. Generator R/W inlet Engineroom, starboard/forward, just aft of generator 7. Speed transducer Engineroom, starboard, near keel between engines 8. Starboard engine R/W inlet Engineroom, starboard, aft of engine 9. Port engine R/W inlet Engineroom, port, aft of engine 10. Unused valve, now closed and plugged Aft stateroom, below sole near starboard/forward corner of the bed All seacocks were in good condition and operated freely. In addition to the seacocks, there are 8 through hull fittings above the waterline on each side of the vessel. All appeared to be in satisfactory condition but could not be examined closely with the vessel afloat. H.2. AIR CONDITIONING: There are two 16000 BTU Cruisair reverse cycle marine air conditioning units to cool the interior of the vessel. The forward unit is located in the space forward of the engineroom and serves the saloon and forward portion of the vessel. The aft unit is under the head of the bed in the owner's stateroom and serves that space. The A/C Raw water pump is located in the space forward of the engineroom, takes suction from the IUW inlet below the sole of that space. There is also a Briskair R/V style air conditioner in the hard top that cools the aft deck enclosure and the pilothouse. Observed satisfactory operation of both systems in both heating and cooling modes. Noted that the exhaust ducting on the aft air conditioning unit needs to be replaced. (K. 1 3.) H3. HEAT: Reverse cycle air conditioning supplemented by portable electric heaters. H.4. MARINE SANITATION DEVICES: The vessel has a new Sea-Land Vacuflush toilet in the aft head. There is a vacuum tank on the port side of the aft portion of the engineroom and a vacuum pump on the port side of the engineroom outboard of the port engine. The pump connects to a Y-valve in the forward portion of the engineroom, to port. This Y-valve is used to either direct the sewage aft to a 40 gallon plastic holding tank located outboard of the port engine or to a Sea—Land SanX type I sewage treatment system located in the port forward comer of the engineroom. The sewage tank is in like new condition and is well secured. The sewage holding tank can only be pumped out at the deck fitting on the port side deck. The system appears to meet all applicable requirements, but it is only connected to the aft toilet. The forward toilet discharges to a Y-valve on the port side of the void space forward of the engineroom that can disrect the sewage overboard ot to the holding tank. The Y-valve is set to direct the sewage to the holding tank. H.5. BILGE PUMPS: There are three 12 volt bilge pumps, each equipped with a float switch for automatic operation, located as follows: 1. Below sole of V-berth. 2. Forward portion of engineroom. 3. Below berth in owner's stateroom. The bilge pump in the forward portion of the engineroom would trip the circuit breaker when used manually. (K. 1 .) Otherwise all three bilge pumps operated satisfactOry in both automatic l4 Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 and manual modes. The controls for the forward pump are located on the bulkhead aft of the hanging locker outside the V-berth. The controls for the engineroom bilge pump are at the main DC panel and controls for the aft pump are on the starboard side of the helm station. Aft bilge pump can not be accessed. (K.4.) H.6. ENGINE COMPARTMENT VENTILATION: Engineroom natural ventilation is satisfactory. There are several vents on each side of the engineroom. The blower is located to port and operated satisfactory. The blower suction line is a 3 inch diameter vent hose that leads to the forward center portion of the engineroom. H.7. STEERING: Steering system is mechanical and operated freely. The wheel turns a vertical shaft in the aft portion of the engineroom, which is linked to a rod that connects to the port tiller. A connecting rod ties port and starboard rudder together. Connections at port rudder could not be observed and some play was noted between rudders. Cotter pins were used in all connections observed. H.8. WINDLASS & GROUND TACKLE: Vessel has no Windlass. A 35 pound Danforth anchor with approximately 5 feet of 3/8 inch chain and an unknown length of 1/2 inch rode was stowed hanging from bow pulpit hangers. Noted that shackles in the ground tackle were safety wired. H.9. DINGHY: No dinghy was observed. H.10. OTHER EQUIPMENT: Vessel is equipped with four battery powered smoke detectors (household variety) located in the aft stateroom, saloon, in the engineroom and outside the V- berth. All smoke detectors were inoperable. (K.5.) I. SAFETY EQUIPMENT & OTHER REQUIREMENTS 1. l. NAVIGATION LIGHTS: Masthead light operated satisfactory. Red, green and stem light operated satisfactory. Anchor light operated properly but switches were unusual. A two position switch was used for the navigation lights, with the first position used for the underway navigation lights and the second position for just the masthead light. A second switch, labeled anchor light, only energizes the aft part of the anchor light, requiring that the masthead light (second position of the Navigation light switch) be energized to provide an all around anchor light. 1.2. HORN: Double trumpet air horn is mounted on the cabin top. This horn is not currently operational. (J .4.) 1.3. BELL: An 8 inch diameter ships bell was observed on the inside of the pilothouse, to starboard. A second bell that 4 inches in diameter was on the port side of the pilothouse interior. 1.4. LIFE PRESERVERS: 6 Adult and no child life preservers were stowed in a canvas bag on the port side of the pilothouse. In addition, 2 type IV PFDs were stowed on the port side of the 15 Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 pilothouse and two more were stowed below the helm seat. The following were in satisfactory condition and acceptable for use on a vessel of this size: Number Size Type Description 2 Adult (med) III Steams model WJ M 9136 4 Adult 11 Atlantic/Pacific model AK-l 1.5. LIFE RING: There were two type IV throwable boat cushions in satisfactory condition in the pilothouse. 1.6. PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: Vessel is a Class 3 motorboat without a fixed fire extinguishing system in the engine room. Three USCG approved B-I portable extinguishers mounted in proper brackets are required (a B-11 is acceptable in lieu of two B-l extinguishers). Actual portable extinguishers on board as follows: ' Location Type Manufacturer Date last serviced Pilothouse, starboard BI(DC) Kidde April 2007 Pilothouse, port BI(DC) Kidde March 2005 Saloon, starboard (loose) BI(DC) Kidde March 2005 Saloon, port forward BI(DC) Kidde April 2007 Aft stateroom, starboard side, fwd BI(DC) Kidde New 2007, but low charge Under saloon steps (loose) BI(DC) Kidde March 2005 Enclosed aft deck BI(DC) Kidde March 2005 Fire extinguishers are required to be professionally serviced annually. (J. 1 .) Fire extinguishers must be mounted in the approved brackets (part of USCG approval). (J .2.) 1.7. FIXED FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: Not applicable. 1.8. DISTRESS SIGNALS: Distress signals are not required in normal area of operation (Potomac River, upstream of 301 bridge). See 33 CFR 175.110 if planning to operate in area where river is more than two miles wide. Distress signals were found onboard in a weather tight container stowed below the helm seat, including 3 Orion 12 gage red meteors with launcher. All expired January 2002. Note: For clarification, distress signals are only required if vessel will be operated below the first point where the river is less than 2 miles wide, which is just below the 301 bridge. If vessel continues to be operated only in the upper Potomac river, flares are not required. 1.9. EPIRB: Not required for inland use. 1.10. BILGE HIGH LEVEL ALARM: Not observed. Not required but highly recommended on all wood boats and liveaboard vessels. (K.7.) 1.11. OIL DISCHARGE PLACARD: On forward bulkhead of engineroom, to port, above the batteries. 16 Survey of WV CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 1.12. REFUSE DISCHARGE PLACARD: Observed in galley above sink and inside door to DC electrical system. 1.13. REFUSE DISPOSAL PLAN: Not required provided vessel is not "oceangoing". 1.14. RADIO STATION LICENSE: No longer required. 1.15. NAVIGATION RULES: Required on all vessels 12 meters or more in length. Not observed. (J .8.) J. REQUIRED REPAIRS AND UPGRADES: Listed in order of importance. These items must be corrected in order to comply with federally mandated regulations or to provide adequate safety for persons on board. J. 1. Demonstrate that all portable fire extinguishers have been serviced within previous year in accordance with (IAW) ABYC A-4.Ap.5.4.2. (1.6.) J .2. Ensure all portable fire extinguishers are mounted in their approved brackets IAW 46 CFR 162.028-3(g). (1.6.) J .3. The vessel should be restricted to operation in protected waters until such time that plank replacement can be accomplished in accordance with the guidance provided by USCG NVIC 7- 95, Guidance on Inspection, Repair and Maintenance of Wooden Hulls that is repeated in section A3. (A3.) J .4. Provide a sound producing device IAW the Inland Navigation Rules. (1.2.) J .5. Provide a means of identifying a reverse power situation in the 30-amp shore power system IAW ABYC E—l 1.8.1. (F.4.) J .6. Provide GFI protection for the llO—volt outlets in the galley and heads IAW ABYC E— 11.15.3.5. (F.4.) J .7. provide a means to secure the dressers in the aft stateroom. (C. 1 .) J .8. Provide a copy of navigation rules (required on all vessels 12 meters or more in length). These can be obtained by telephone order (202-783-3 23 8) or by mail (Superintendent of documents, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402). The stock number is 050— 012—00287-8 and the cost is around $8. (1.15.) K. RECOMMENDED REPAIRS AND UPGRADES: These items are recommended by this surveyor and are not required. However, it is the opinion of this surveyor that correction of these 17 Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 items would improve the level of safety and/or value of this vessel or in some cases prevent future problems. K. 1. Demonstrate the satisfactory operation of the engineroom bilge pump in manual without tripping the overcurrent protection. (H.5.) K.2. Demonstrate the satisfactory operation of the generator under load. (F.2.) K.3. Provide access to allow examination of all connections to port rudder. (G.7.) K.4. Provide access to the aft bilge pump. (H.5.) K.5. Demonstrate the satisfactory operation of the smoke detectors. (H.10.) K.6. Demonstrate the satisfactory operation of an explosive vapor detector in the engineroom. (D. 1 .) K.7. Provide high bilge level alarm. (1.10.) K.8. Consider replacing the impellers in all raw water pumps to avoid a loss of cooling water due to impeller failure. (G.l.) K.9. Monitor the condition of the batteries and replace as necessary. (F. 1 .) K. 10. Demonstrate the satisfactory operation of the windshield wipers. (D. l .) K.l l. Repaint the vessel hull. (A3.) K.l2. Refinish the transom. (A3.) K. 1 3. Replace the crushed ducting in the aft air conditioning system. (H.2.) K. 14. If desired, replace the missing mattresses in the forward ststeroom. (C. 1 .) K. 1 5. Re-secure the loose parquet in the floor of the forward and aft stateroom. (C.5.) K.l6. If desired, modify the supporting structure of the soles in the saloon and aft stateroom to remove the distortion. (C.5.) K.l7. Re—secure the flooring in the aft head. (C.5.) K.18. Clean the vinyl overhead to remove cigarette stains as desired. (C.6.) K.19. Resecure the overhead panel and trim above the port side of the helm. (C.6.) l8 Survey of WV CORSAIR II April 30, 2009 K.20. Replace the missing trim in the overhead of the aft deck. (C.6.) L. DETERMINATION OF VALUE L. 1. PRESENT MARKET VALUE: For the purpose of this survey, Present Market Value is defined as the surveyors best estimate of the current value of the vessel, based on the latest BUC book figures for high and low values of similar vessels, including area and condition adjustments as recommended in the BUC book and any other factors that may influence the value of the vessel. In this case, the 96th edition of the 2009 BUC Used Boat Price Guide indicates that values for a 1959 46 foot Richardson Golden Anniversary double cabin hard top motor yacht with these engines can range from a low of $38,700 to a high of $43,000. It should be noted that this is a significant drop from earlier estimates. No Richardson motoryachts made of wood were found on the market or as having sold recently. There were two Richardson’s with aluminum hulls sold in 2007 and another in 2005 at values ranging between $34,000 and $65,000 but these vessels are not really comparable. The most recent sale of a wood Richardson was a 1956 38 footer that sold for $18,000 in 2006. Prior to that a 1960 40 footer sold for $10,000 in 2003. To find any sales for more than $30,000 you have to go back to 2000. This particular vessel is in better than average condition. There has been a significant investment in maintaining the hull of this vessel over the years. However, at one point it appears that long cedar planks were not available and compromises were made by using mahogany planks and/or short planks. Although the hull is in very good condition with respect to the planking and frames, with only a few localized areas where rot is developing that need attention, there has been a reduction in the overall longitudinal strength of the hull due to the use of several short planks. The vessel should be restricted to operation on partially protected waters until such time as the short planks are replaced and new planks are installed in accordance with USCG NVIC 7-95. In addition to the work that has been done to maintain the hull, the cabin top of this vessel has been completely rebuilt, the hard top both raised and extended aft and the aft deck enclosed and air conditioned. The vessel’s shore power has been upgraded to 50—amps/250—volt system and a separate 30- amp/125-volt system and most of the wiring in the vessel has been renewed. Recent upgrades include a full size refrigerator installed in the galley, a new Vacuflush toilet and all new sewage system that includes both a holding tank and a type I sewage treatment system. If someone is looking for a classic wood vessel with these features the figures in the BUC Used Boat Price Guide would be a reasonable expectation of what they would need to expect to pay. However, there seem to be fewer buyers of wooden boats each year and that number has become almost insignificant in the current economic situation. This is due not only to the relatively high annual expense of maintaining a wooden vessel and the difficulty in finding qualified shiprights, but the fact that many insurance companies will not insure older wood vessels and many marinas do not welcome wood boats. This has had a significant detrimental effect on the value of wooden boats, even when they are in good condition. All things considered, I believe that the real market value of this vessel in todays economic situation is approximately $30,000. However, it may take a long time to find the right buyer at that price. In a distress situation such as this where the estate needs to sell the vessel quickly to avoid incurring high dockage fees, it may be possible to purchase this vessel for under $10,000. 19 Survey of MN CORSAIR 11 April 30, 2009 L2. REPLACEMENT VALUE: The replacement value is the estimated cost to build a new vessel, using the same construction techniques, and outfitting it in a similar manner to this vessel. Vessels of this type are seldom built these days due to the expense, but the BUC Used Boat Price Guide estimated this vessel could be duplicated for approximately $771,000 in 2007. For some reason that estimate has currently dropped to $400,000, possibly due to the decrease in both material and labor cost in the current economic situation. M. CONCLUSION: The M/V CORSAIR II is a well maintained vessel that has been continuously modified and upgraded to meet the owner's needs as a liveaboard vessel. Major modifications include removal of the second stateroom aft and enlargement of the owners stateroom, raising and extending the hard top to provide adequate headroom in the pilothouse and aft deck as well as enclosing and air conditioning the aft deck. In addition, the vessel has been well maintained structurally, including installation of a new stem, new transom and many planks as well as refastening the hull, rebuilding the cabin top and covering the decks and cabin top with Fiberglas. Mechanical systems have been professionally maintained and most have been upgraded recently. The vessel’s AC electrical system has been upgraded to meet current ABYC requirements. The vessel has a new Vacuflush toilet in the aft head as well as a new sewage holding tank as well as a new type I sewage treatment system. Required and recommended actions are indicated in sections J & K of this report. However, there are no discrepancies that have a significant adverse effect on this vessel’s value. When the required actions are complete the yacht will be a good risk for insurance purposes. Requirement in this survey are actions that are required by federal regulations or, in the opinion of this surveyor, are items that must be corrected to ensure the safety of passengers and/or crew. Recommendations in this survey are actions that, based on the opinion of this surveyor, would increase the value, safety or serviceability of this vessel, or in some cases prevent deterioration or future problems. In no case should the recommendations suggested become mandatory items for correction in order to secure adequate insurance up to the values indicated in section L. This report is submitted without prejudice. It's content is the opinion of the undersigned only, unless otherwise stated. It is understood that the undersigned is not responsible for any defects or conditions of this vessel. This report also does not guarantee or warrant the condition of the vessel. This report was prepared for the exclusive use of Patrick O’Connell and my not be used by another party without the written permission of the undersigned surveyor. Acceptance of this report implies acceptance of the above conditions. 20 ...
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2009-Survey - Survey of MN CORSAIR II April 30, 2009...

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