4-01-09_Notes

4-01-09_Notes - Atmospheric CO2 measurements showing annual...

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- Atmospheric CO2 measurements showing annual cycles of CO2 fixation related to  seasonal variation in Calvin cycle activity of terrestrial plants - Calvin cycle operates in the ocean all the time - Evergreen plants still carry out photosynthesis is winter, but when it gets very cold, they  have to change and stop growing - Ocean doesn’t change that much - We’re getting rid of terrestrial plants, so the amount has probably gone down  - Amount of CO2 being used has gone up by at least 20%  - Global warming phenomena  - CO2 releases more heat in the atmosphere than oxygen does - Photosynthetic CO2  fixation - Melvin Calvin found earliest labeled product was 3-phosphoglycerate - After experimentation, the key reaction seemed to be: CO2 + C5 acceptor  C6  acceptor   2(3-phosphoglycerate) - Found that the enzyme carrying out this reactions was ribulose biphsophate  carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) which accounts for 15% of total protein in the  chloroplast - Plant chloroplast makes NADPH/ATP but takes them and uses it in a reaction to make  sugars and as a source to build up sugars  - Adding it to previous sugars would make a 6C unit, and a 3C unit - Can assemble different sugars as a building block - Can build up all possible sugars 
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This note was uploaded on 05/03/2010 for the course BISC 330L taught by Professor Petruska,tower during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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4-01-09_Notes - Atmospheric CO2 measurements showing annual...

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