PHI 306 EC Ch 23

PHI 306 EC Ch 23 - nothing that can be done, for one must...

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Lauren Napolitano Extra Credit Ch 23 Active and Passive Euthanasia 1.) What is the distinction, as Rachels describes it, between active and passive euthanasia? Rachels says that active euthanasia is considered to be taking direct action designed to kill the patient. He describes passive euthanasia as withholding treatment and allowing the patient to die. 2.) Regarding their justifiable use, what does Rachels argue is the relationship between the two above types of euthanasia? Rachels argues that according to the AMA doctrine, the matter of life and death is being decided on irrelevant grounds. He uses the example of the baby with Down’s syndrome to prove this. Sometimes, a baby who is born with Down’s syndrome, the baby can have congenital defects, such as an intestinal obstruction. “When there is an intestinal blockage, one can ‘let the baby die,’ but when there is no such defect there is
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Unformatted text preview: nothing that can be done, for one must not kill it. Rachels says that this idea leads to such results as deciding life or death on irrelevant grounds. 3.) What is Rachels position on the AMA policy regarding active euthanasia quoted on the first page of his article? Rachels believes that the AMA policy regarding active euthanasia as wrong should be rejected. In order to argue this, he explains that the doctrine prohibits mercy killing because it is the intentional termination of a life. However, Rachels points out that cessation of treatment is also the intentional termination of a life. Therefore, the decision to let a patient die is subject to moral appraisal in the same way that the decision to kill him would be. Rachels claims that this is why there is no moral difference between active and passive euthanasia, and the policy should be rejected from a moral standpoint....
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PHI 306 EC Ch 23 - nothing that can be done, for one must...

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