Catalog - Bryant& Stratton College 2010 O F F I C I A L C AT A L O G Bryant& Stratton College Campus Locations New York Campuses Albany 1259

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Unformatted text preview: Bryant & Stratton College 2010 O F F I C I A L C AT A L O G Bryant & Stratton College Campus Locations New York Campuses Albany 1259 Central Avenue Albany, NY 12205 Telephone 518/437-1802 Fax 518/437-1048 Ohio Campuses Cleveland Downtown 1700 East 13th Street Cleveland, OH 44114 Telephone 216/771-1700 Fax 216/771-7787 Amherst Audubon Business Centre 40 Hazelwood Drive Amherst, NY 14228 Telephone 716/691-0012 Fax 716/691-6716 Eastlake 35350 Curtis Boulevard Eastlake, OH 44095 Telephone 440/510-1112 Fax 440/306-2015 Parma Official Catalog January 2010 Buffalo 465 Main Street, 4th Floor Buffalo, NY 14203 Telephone 716/884-9120 Fax 716/884-0091 12955 Snow Road Parma, OH 44130 Telephone 216/265-3151 Fax 216/265-0325 Greece 150 Bellwood Drive Rochester, NY 14606 Telephone 585/720-0660 Fax 585/720-9226 Virginia Campuses Richmond 8141 Hull Street Road Richmond, VA 23235 Telephone 804/745-2444 Fax 804/745-6884 Henrietta 1225 Jefferson Road Rochester, NY 14623 Telephone 585/292-5627 Fax 585/292-6015 Virginia Beach 301 Centre Pointe Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23462 Telephone 757/499-7900 Fax 757/499-9977 Southtowns Sterling Park 200 Redtail Orchard Park, NY 14127 Telephone 716/677-9500 Fax 716/677-9599 Wisconsin Campuses Milwaukee 310 West Wisconsin Avenue Suite 500 East Milwaukee, WI 53203 Telephone 414/276-5200 Fax 414/276-3930 Syracuse 953 James Street Syracuse, NY 13203 Telephone 315/472-6603 Fax 315/474-4383 Wauwatosa 10950 W. Potter Road Wauwatosa, WI 53226 Telephone 414/302-7000 Fax 414/302-7009 Syracuse North 8687 Carling Road Liverpool, NY 13090 Telephone 315/652-6500 Fax 315/652-5500 Bayshore 500 Silver Spring Rd. Suite K340 Glendale, WI 53217 Telephone 414/961-9600 Fax 414/961-9605 This catalog is an official publication of Bryant & Stratton College. As such it is subject to revision at any time. Bryant & Stratton College reserves the right to make changes in connection with any subject described in this catalog including curricula, class schedules, course content, training equipment, faculty, staff, tuition & fees, provisions or requirements, as it, in its sole discretion deems appropriate. Bryant & Stratton College reserves the right to make such changes without notice at any time, even after a program of study or course affected by a change has begun. It is advised that all students read and fully understand the rules, regulations and College-based policies stated in this catalog and its future updates. For the most current version of the catalog, visit www.bryantstratton.edu. Students should retain a copy of this catalog for their records. Bryant & Stratton College is an equal opportunity educator and employer. The official catalog of Bryant & Stratton College is printed once each academic year, with updates each semester posted to www.bryantstratton.edu. Within 10 business days of the start of classes, students receive an email with the link to the electronic catalog in effect for that semester. Online Education Sterling Park 200 Redtail Orchard Park, NY 14127 Telephone 800/836-5627 Telephone 716/677-8800 Fax 716/677-8899 www.bryantstratton.edu Table of Contents Accreditations and Approvals, Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Academic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Financing Your Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 General Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Information by State/Division New York Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Ohio Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Virginia Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Wisconsin Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Academic Calendar: Campus-Based Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Academic Calendar: Distance Learners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Programs of Study and Degree Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 66 Fraud Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Board of Directors & Officers of Bryant & Stratton College . . . . . . 88 Faculty & Staff Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 90 New York Albany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Amherst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Buffalo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Greece . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Henrietta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Southtowns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Syracuse Downtown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Syracuse North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Ohio Cleveland Downtown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Eastlake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Parma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Virginia Richmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Virginia Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Wisconsin Bayshore, Milwaukee & Wauwatosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 108 Online Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 JANUARY 2010 Publication Date: January 2010 2 Accreditations and Approvals State Approvals The academic programs at all Bryant & Stratton College campuses are approved and registered by their respective State Education Departments: New York State Board of Regents Ohio Board of Regents Ohio Board of Nursing State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) Virginia Board of Nursing State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board (EAB) Wisconsin Board of Nursing In New York State, Bryant & Stratton College campuses are authorized by the New York State Board of Regents to confer Associate of Occupational Studies and Associate of Applied Science degrees. The Amherst, Buffalo and Southtowns campuses are authorized by the New York State Board of Regents to confer the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. All three Ohio campuses are authorized by the state of Ohio to confer associate and baccalaureate degrees. These degrees are also approved by the Ohio Board of Regents. Accreditations & Approvals Bryant & Stratton College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (267) 284-5000. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. The Medical Assisting programs offered at Albany, Bayshore, Buffalo, Cleveland Downtown, Eastlake, Greece, Henrietta, Milwaukee, Parma, Richmond, Southtowns, Syracuse, Syracuse North, Virginia Beach and Wauwatosa are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org), on recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs contact information: 1361 Park Street Clearwater, FL 33756 (727) 210-2650 The Nursing programs offered at the Eastlake, Parma, and Wauwatosa campuses are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). The Eastlake and Parma campuses are viewed as one accredited program by the Ohio Board of Nursing and the NLNAC. The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) contact information: 61 Broadway-33rd Floor New York, NY 10006 (800) 669-1656 Ex. 153 Bryant & Stratton College is approved for the training of veterans and other eligible persons and for administering educational programs sponsored by state and federal agencies such as the Bureau of Indian Affairs and state rehabilitation services. The institution is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students. Mission Statement Bryant & Stratton College is a career college delivering outcomesbased education and training through a flexible, contemporary curriculum in a personalized environment. JANUARY 2010 3 Admissions Bryant & Stratton College seeks students who desire practical career preparation in selected fields of study and have the ability to achieve academic success. It is recommended that prospective students apply as early as possible to ensure full consideration and proper placement. Applications are accepted throughout the year for fall, winter and spring semester starts. Refer to the Academic Calendar for exact starting dates for building-based or online courses. Bryant & Stratton College welcomes first inquiries from high school students and their parents during their junior year. The admissions staff is available to explain curriculum planning and career opportunities. Students who are currently matriculating at a Bryant & Stratton College campus in a building-based academic program may be eligible to take Online courses. Students who receive a degree online will be awarded a degree that reflects the campus location where the degree has been approved to be conferred. Information about all Bryant & Stratton College campuses may be obtained from any admissions representative or at the web site, www.bryantstratton.edu. through homeschooling, as defined by the law of the State in which the homeschooling was provided. Conditional acceptance is granted for applicants applying for Online programs, the Nursing Program, or baccalaureate programs pending official verification of high school graduation. ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Entry and Program Requirements Admissions Interview and Tour An important step in the admission process is a personalized interview with an admissions representative to discuss the College programs and conduct a campus tour. Candidates for the Nursing program are interviewed by the Nursing Program Director or his or her designee. Admissions representatives are available for day, evening and Saturday morning appointments including school vacation and most school holidays. An interview and campus tour can be completed in approximately one hour. Application Procedure 1. Applications for admission to the college may be obtained from the Admissions Office or at www.bryantstratton.edu. 2. The completed application is then submitted to the selected Bryant & Stratton College campus or Online Education. 3. Applications are accepted throughout the year for all future enrollment dates. Placement Evaluation All building-based students and online distance learners accepted for enrollment at Bryant & Stratton College will be subject to course and/or program evaluations. Students may be scheduled in pre-college courses based upon their placement evaluation scores and past academic history. Notification of Admissions Decision Bryant & Stratton College's admission policy makes it possible, in most cases, for applicants to be notified of the admission decision as soon as the application process is complete. Conditional acceptance is granted for applicants applying for building-based associate degree programs pending their selfcertification on their FAFSA that they have received a high school diploma or GED or that they have completed secondary school through homeschooling, as defined by the law of the State in which the homeschooling was provided. If the applicant is not applying for Title IV financial assistance, and thus will not be submitting a FAFSA, conditional acceptance may be granted for applicants pending their affirmation on their application that they have received a high school diploma or GED or that they have completed secondary school JANUARY 2010 For consideration into an Associate Degree Program, the candidate must: 1. Submit a completed Application or eApplication using the feature located on the Internet at www.bryantstratton.edu/online for Admission to the college. 2. Have either: a. demonstrated the ability to benefit from a postsecondary education by passing a federally-approved assessment test; or b. certified on their FAFSA that her or she has received a high school diploma or GED or that he or she has completed secondary school through homeschooling, as defined by the law of the State in which the homeschooling was provided. If the applicant is not applying for Title IV financial assistance, and thus will not be submitting a FAFSA, the applicant's affirmation on his or her application that he or she has received a high school diploma or GED or that he or she has completed secondary school through homeschooling, as defined by the law of the State in which the homeschooling was provided, will be sufficient. 3. Complete an Admissions Representative Interview. Each applicant will be interviewed by an admissions associate. The purpose of the interview is to assess the educational and professional goals of the applicant and determine if Bryant & Stratton College is a good match. During the interview, an admissions associate will provide information regarding the College's educational mission; a content overview of the degree; admission criteria application, tuition costs, and will refer students to financial aid representatives who can discuss financial aid options. 4. Complete an entrance evaluation and meet any articulated program requirements and other evaluations required by state, federal and accreditation bodies. 5. Provide Proof of Immunization. New York State residents who are candidates for admission to campuses in New York State who were born on or after January 1, 1957, must provide proof of immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) within 30 days of the start of their first term of enrollment. During the admissions process, candidates in New York State will sign a statement which states they understand they will be dismissed from classes if the required documentation is not received within 30 days of the start of the first term of enrollment. (Candidates who produce third-party documentation that they have scheduled an appointment for the first MMR may be considered to be in good standing at the 30-day point. Such candidates must subsequently produce documentation of having received the first MMR, of having arranged for the second MMR in thirty days, and of finally receiving the second dose. Candidates who attended primary school in New York State after 1980 and/or who graduated from high school in New York State in or after 1984 need only receive a single MMR shot to meet the immunization requirements.) 6. Meet additional requirements to be admitted to the Nursing Program. (See below). In addition, Online associate degree applicants may not be admitted as ability to benefit students. For this reason, Online applicants must provide an official U.S. high school transcript indicating successful completion, or official documentation of a U.S. GED. 4 NURSING PROGRAM (Offered only at select campus locations) Entry and Program Requirements For consideration into the Nursing Program, the candidate must: 1. Submit a completed Application or eApplication using the feature located on the Internet at www.bryantstratton.edu/online for Admission to the college. 2. Provide an official U.S. high school transcript indicating successful completion, or official documentation of a U.S. GED or provide documentation establishing successful completion of secondary school through homeschooling, as defined by the law of the State in which the homeschooling was provided. 3. Complete a Nursing Program Director Interview. Each Nursing Program candidate must be interviewed by the Nursing Program Director or his or her designee. Selection to the program is made by the Nursing Program Selection Committee and is based on admission test scores, past academic record, and interview results. 4. Complete standardized assessments. 5. Attain college level placement scores on both the English and Mathematics placement evaluations. 6. Successfully complete a specialized nursing assessment. 7. Provide documentation of a recent physical exam and other required laboratory test results described in the admissions interview during the first semester. 8. Conduct a caregiver and background check in accordance with state regulations. (Fees vary by state and the College funds the initial background check. Student is responsible for any or all other required checks.) 9. Meet current health record documentation requirements. 10. Agree to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug screening. A criminal background check and/or drug screening may be conducted at any time during or before the first semester. A positive drug screen is grounds for dismissal from the program. Note that the academic standards for the Nursing Program have different levels of performance, and supplement the measuring points and requirements outlined in the Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress. These standards are used to evaluate the student's ability to progress in the Nursing Program. Refer to the Nursing Program Student Handbook. transcripts are necessary to evaluate credit, applicants must provide the transcripts confirming earned credit from a regionally or nationally accredited college. These documents must be a part of the applicant's application packet before consideration of a candidate's application is made. Official transcript(s) must be received by the end of the first semester. c. Personal Essay. Applicants must submit a non-graded informational essay that is 1 - 2 double-spaced, typewritten pages. 5. Complete a Bachelor Program Administration Interview. An interview with a bachelor program administrator may be scheduled as part of acceptance and prior to acceptance. 6. Provide Proof of Immunization. Candidates for admission to campuses in New York State who were born on or after January 1, 1957, must provide proof of immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) within 30 days of the start of their first term of enrollment. During the admissions process, candidates in New York State will sign a statement which states they understand they will be dismissed from classes if the required documentation is not received within 30 days of the start of the first term of enrollment. (Candidates who produce third-party documentation that they have scheduled an appointment for the first MMR may be considered to be in good standing at the 30-day point. Such candidates must subsequently produce documentation of having received the first MMR, of having arranged for the second MMR in thirty days, and of finally receiving the second dose. Candidates who attended primary school in New York State after 1980 and/or who graduated from high school in New York State in or after 1984 need only receive a single MMR shot to meet the immunization requirements.) An interview with a bachelor program administrator may be scheduled as part of the acceptance and prior to acceptance. Associate Degree Graduates BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS (Offered only at select building-based locations. See Baccalaureate Degree Programs; Online) For consideration into the Baccalaureate Degree Programs, the candidate must: 1. Submit a completed Application or eApplication using the feature located on the Internet at www.bryantstratton.edu/online for Admission to the college. 2. Provide an official U.S. high school transcript indicating successful completion, or official documentation of a U.S. GED or provide documentation establishing successful completion of secondary school through homeschooling, as defined by the law of the State in which the homeschooling was provided. High school graduates must have a minimum GPA of 75% or 2.5 out of 4.0 and those possessing GEDs must have a minimum average standard score of 500 (taken after 2002) or an average standard score of 50 (taken before 2002). 3. Complete an Admissions Representative Interview. Each prospective student will be interviewed by an admissions associate. The purpose of the interview is to assess the educational and professional goals of the prospective student and determine if Bryant & Stratton College is a good match. During the interview an admissions associate will provide information regarding the College's educational mission; a content overview of the degree; admission criteria application, tuition costs, and will refer students to financial aid representatives who can discuss financial aid options. 4. Complete and submit to an admissions associate for review by the acceptance committee: a. Bachelor Application Form. b. Transcripts of post-secondary educational experience. If a. Associate degree graduates from Bryant & Stratton College in Business or Criminal Justice gain automatic acceptance to the corresponding bachelor programs. b. Associate degree graduates from Bryant & Stratton College in non-Business or non-Criminal Justice must possess a 2.5 GPA and must submit an application to the program to be considered a candidate. If the candidate has a GPA below a 2.5, he or she may enroll in the corresponding AOS program until the transcript reveals that the standard has been met. c. Associate degree graduates from peer institutions must possess a 2.5 GPA and a "C" grade in English and Math to be considered for acceptance into the College's baccalaureate programs. If the candidate has a GPA below a 2.5, he or she may enroll in the corresponding AOS program until the transcript reveals that the standard has been met. Intra-College Transfers Admission to a baccalaureate program at one Bryant & Stratton College campus is transferable to other Bryant & Stratton College campuses including Online Education pending availability of the degree at that campus. Online Education JANUARY 2010 In addition to the above requirements, applicants to Online Education must meet certain technology requirements in order to be successful. Applicants must read and accept the technology agreement which outlines the necessary requirements for acceptance into Online Education. The minimal requirements include: Hardware: 1 GHz processor or higher 1 GB of RAM DVD drive 20 GB of available disk space Windows XP SP2 or higher operating system A webcam, microphone, and speakers 5 A printer Other computer accessories may be required in the future Software: Internet Explorer 7.0 or higher Microsoft Office 2007 Professional to include: Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Publisher Updated anti-virus software Adobe Flash 9 or higher (Free Download at: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/) Acrobat 7 or higher (Free Download at: http://get.adobe.com/reader/) ITunes 7 or higher (Free Download at: http://www.apple.com/itunes/download/) Quicktime 7 or higher (Free Download at: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/) Other software, including upgrades, may be required in the future Connectivity: Broadband Internet service (strongly recommended) Personal email address 5. The first semester's tuition and, if applicable, room and board, paid in advance of acceptance. International students will be issued the I-20 when formally accepted to one of the College's campus locations. The I-20 will not be issued for students taking all classes via Online. This I-20 form must be taken by the student, along with his or her passport, and the financial documentation, to the nearest United States consulate or embassy for the purpose of receiving the appropriate student visa. All of these documents and the proof of English proficiency may be reviewed by a U.S. Customs Inspector upon entry to the United States. Upon arrival in the U.S. city where the student will be attending Bryant & Stratton College, the student should immediately contact the campus Admissions Office. A visit and tour of the campus and, if applicable, student housing, will be arranged. During the visit, the student will also complete placement evaluations for appropriate placement and registration for the first semester classes. Admissions with Advanced Standing Bryant & Stratton College grants advanced standing based upon accepted transfer of college credit, high school articulation, and/or evaluation of knowledge and skills by selected course proficiency examination. Although Bryant & Stratton College does not grant credit for life experience, the College does recognize that students possess life experiences. Consequently, the College offers the opportunity to attempt Proficiency Examinations in selected courses. Up to 50 percent of the total credit hours required for graduation, including up to 50 percent of the total required hours in the major study area, may be earned through a combination of transfer credits, high school articulation, national evaluation, and proficiency examinations. Students who wish to take courses at other colleges while pursuing a program at Bryant & Stratton College may have their credits transferred into their program providing they obtain written approval from the Dean or designee prior to enrolling in the outside courses and providing they have an official transcript sent to the Dean or designee upon successful completion. Before beginning this process, a student should meet with a Financial Services staff member to discuss how transfer credit may impact federal, state, and building-based financial aid and scholarship funds. International Applicants Entry and Program Requirements For consideration into any Bryant & Stratton College program, International applicants must submit the documentation and information as stated above for the particular program to which they are applying. In addition, they must submit the following documentation with their application materials: 1. An original, official transcript from a secondary school or university which has been authenticated and evaluated by an authorized, independent third party chosen by Bryant & Stratton College, together with a notarized and certified translation if the document is recorded in a language other than English. Such translation is to be supplied by the applicant at the applicant's expense. Employees of Bryant & Stratton College shall not be utilized to provide the required translations. 2. Documentation of either a score of 500 or better on the traditional paper version of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or a score of 173 on the computerized TOEFL, or a passing score on Level 6 of the ASPECT English Language Proficiency. If required, International applicants will need to complete this evaluation before acceptance at Bryant & Stratton College. It is the applicant's responsibility to set up all details of the TOEFL evaluation. (Web link: TOEFL Information at www.ets.org). Exceptions: a. Nonnative speakers who hold degrees or diplomas from postsecondary institutions in English-speaking countries (e.g., the United States, Canada, England, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand) b. Nonnative speakers who have successfully completed at least a two-year course of study in which English was the language of instruction c. Transfer students from institutions in the United States or Canada whose academic course work was favorably evaluated in relation to its demands and duration. d. Nonnative speakers who have taken the TOEFL test within the past two years e. Nonnative speakers who have successfully pursued academic work at schools where English was the language of instruction in an English-speaking country for two years. 3. A statement signed by the secondary school principal or other qualified person indicating sufficient proficiency in English to cope with college-level studies. Such statement must be written in English. 4. An original proof of finance letter issued by a U.S. or foreign banking institution certifying that the sponsor or student has adequate funds to meet financial obligations to Bryant & Stratton College and living expenses while enrolled. Students with Special Needs Students with disabilities are invited to discuss their needs with their student services advisor prior to registration. Students requesting accommodations are required to provide current documentation to determine reasonable accommodations where appropriate. Application for Readmission Former Bryant & Stratton College students who wish to apply for readmission should contact the Academic Office for an Application of Readmission. Returning students are not required to resubmit copies of records already on file. Any prior tuition balances and student loan status must be cleared before re-entry application forms are processed. Readmission requirements for the Nursing Program are found in the Nursing Program Student Handbook. Students dismissed for failure to meet Standards of Academic Progress and who were not granted immediate readmission based on a mitigating circumstances appeal may be considered for readmission after an absence of not less than one semester provided that it is mathematically possible for them to restore their satisfactory academic progress by the time they have attempted 12 additional credits after readmission. FSRs [former student returning] who are not able to mathematically attain Satisfactory Progress by the time they have attempted 12 additional credits after readmission MAY NOT be considered for readmission. Students who do not achieve satisfactory 6 JANUARY 2010 academic standing at the end of the probationary period will be dismissed. Students who were dismissed must meet with an academic manager or a designated advisor to review the circumstances which led to the dismissal and to discuss the commitment required for the student to become successful. Following the meeting, the academic associate will make a recommendation regarding the student's potential for academic success. A negative recommendation may disqualify the student for readmission. Students dismissed for issues relative to conduct and deportment, as defined in the Code of Student Conduct published in this Official Catalog, will be eligible for readmission only if they are able to present reasonable proof that they have overcome the situation that lead to their inappropriate behavior. The decision to readmit will be made by the academic dean after a thorough review of the situation. Students seeking readmission after an administrative dismissal may be required to meet with the dean and/or a designated representative of the dean to discuss their situation. The decision of the dean will be final in all matters of readmission of students dismissed for reasons of conduct and deportment. Students dismissed based on failure to complete their pre-college course requirements after two attempts may be considered for readmission after an absence of not less than one calendar year (3 academic semesters). In either case, readmission will be granted solely at the discretion of the academic dean or designee. Returning students are required to meet all curriculum requirements in effect at the time of their return. If the curriculum and/or learning methodologies have been updated since a student last attended Bryant & Stratton College, that student may be required to attend an orientation program prior to returning to classes. All credits earned during prior enrollment will be assessed for validity to current programs. Some credits earned in the past may not be applicable to the contemporary curriculum particularly technology. Returning students may be asked to complete an assessment in a skill area before contemporary credit is granted. Returning students who were originally admitted as Ability to Benefit (ATB) students will not be readmitted unless they meet one of the following four criteria: Prior to dropping out of Bryant & Stratton College, established a record of success (passing all courses taken). or Prior to dropping out of Bryant & Stratton College, earned 24 credit hours and applied for and received from the state, the high school equivalency credential and can produce the related documentation. or Earned a GED or GHED (Wisconsin) during their absence from Bryant & Stratton College and can produce official documentation of their achievement. or Makes a written request to return to school that includes a statement that he/she has overcome any obstacles that would prevent him/her from maintaining active status and graduating. Transfer of Credits Students who wish to transfer from other accredited postsecondary institutions will be given appropriate credit for courses where they have earned a grade of C (2.0) out of a possible (4.0) or better. Transfer courses must be comparable in level and content to subjects in their program at Bryant & Stratton College. Applicants requesting transfer credit must arrange for their official college transcript(s) to be sent to Bryant & Stratton College for evaluation. Transfer credits are assessed on a course-by-course basis. Transferability of credits to Bryant & Stratton College may be affected by the age of the credits and by the degree to which related technology has changed since the credits were earned. All requests for transfer credit to an associate degree must be completed by the end of the student's first semester of enrollment at Bryant & Stratton College. Requests for the transfer credit to the bachelor degree program must be completed prior to registration. Transfer of Bryant & Stratton College Credits The receiving institution will determine the transferability of college credit. It may be accomplished only after an individual evaluation of the student's educational record by the receiving institution. Students who are considering transferring to a four-year college after graduation from Bryant & Stratton College are advised to consult with that college to determine its transfer policies. Bryant & Stratton College students who would like further information should consult with the Academic Office early in their program. Students who intend to take state business or professional licensing examinations should determine the state's prerequisites prior to selecting programs of study. Certain Bryant & Stratton College campuses have established transfer articulation agreements with area colleges. A list of existing collegiate articulation agreements are found in the Academic Office on campus. National Evaluation Programs Bryant & Stratton College will also grant college credit for applicable passing grades earned on various non-traditional college-level evaluations such as College Level Examination Program (CLEP), College Proficiency Examination Program (CPEP), American Council of Education (ACE), Regents Internal Degree Program (REDE), Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Educational Support (DANTES), and the U.S. Air Force Institute (USAFI). All requests for credit for national evaluations must be completed by the end of the student's first semester of enrollment at Bryant & Stratton College. Credit by Examination (Proficiency Examination) Bryant & Stratton College offers students the opportunity to take examinations to validate their academic mastery of selected general field or subject courses. The student may earn college credit for the earned score of 90% or better on the College's standardized examination(s). The Credit by Examination process does not waive the requirement of the course from the degree plan; however the mastery of the exam results in advanced placement credit in the degree plan due to the earned credit. Students are eligible for a single attempt per examination. There is a charge of $100 per examination. Financial aid funds may not be utilized for the examination. Students interested in attempting Credit by Examination should consult with their admissions representative or their academic advisor for complete details. Proficiency examinations for online students must be taken at an approved site. JANUARY 2010 7 Facts for Veterans Bryant & Stratton College programs are approved for the training of veterans, veterans' children and veterans' spouses in accordance with the rules and regulations administered by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Applicants may be referred to representatives of the Department of Veterans Affairs who are available to counsel them on their eligibility and entitlement for veteran's educational benefits. evening shifts, as well as enroll in both day or evening courses, depending on the availability of courses. The College is under no obligation to guarantee a specific clinical placement or time. Online Class Schedule Online courses are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at a computer located anywhere in the world with an internet connection. Online classes have multiple weekly deadlines and are identified in Eastern Time. Students can budget their time to attend class (read lecture material, read announcements, complete tests, and participate in discussion) and to complete homework (assignments, projects, reading the text book, etc...) to meet weekly deadlines. Online courses are offered in two 7.5 week sessions within the traditional 15 week semester. Application for Individual Subjects Application may be made for individual subjects in person or by mail or facsimile by completing an individual subject application. When the application has been received and processed, the student will be sent an acceptance letter and instructions for completing registration. The student should consult with an admissions representative to determine class hours, days classes meet and prerequisite requirements (if applicable). Class schedules are available during registration. Students taking individual subjects are classified as non-matriculated, and federal financial aid is not available to them. If at some point non-matriculating students decide to matriculate, they will be required to adhere to the complete admissions process. Participation and Attendance Attendance is an important element of your academic success. Details of participation are provided on each course supplemental syllabi. ONLINE EDUCATION Technology Requirements Online Learning Online learners at Bryant & Stratton College must have the following technology requirements to be successful in the distance learning programs. Minimal technology requirements: Hardware: Academic Information Class Schedule Bryant & Stratton College's campus based annual academic schedule is based on three 15 week semesters. There is a brief break between semesters. The College is closed on most legal holidays. For specific calendar information, refer to the Academic Calendar. All full-time students are scheduled in academic programs that may be completed in 16-20 months for associate degrees and 36-40 months for baccalaureate degrees if the student does not require pre-college course work, carries a full-credit course schedule, and attends on a full-time, consecutive-semester basis. Students who earn fewer than the recommended number of credits per semester, who fail courses, or who interrupt their programs may be unable to complete their programs in this amount of time. Students who fail or withdraw from required courses must complete their required courses the next time they are offered. Students may be limited in the number of opportunities allowed to pass individual courses and may be counseled to reconsider their career plans based on difficulty they may have mastering certain skills and knowledge. Classes are offered during the day, evening, weekends and online. Schedules are determined by the individual campuses and are subject to change based on availability. Some programs require courses to be taken exclusively online. Evening students who wish to complete their degree program in four semesters may be required to take certain classes on Saturday or on weekdays during the day. Students may complete their programs as fulltime students taking only evening classes; however, they may be required to attend classes for more than four semesters to earn their degree. All programs feature field experience in the form of internship or practicum which may require scheduling outside of normal school hours. Students will be assigned to field experience related to their degree program. Nursing students are scheduled in clinical agencies to provide patient/client care at varied times. Students who hold jobs must arrange with employers for flexibility in meeting College requirements. To complete the Nursing Program it may be necessary for a student to complete his/her clinical rotations during the week, both day and 1 GHz processor or higher 1 GB of RAM DVD drive 20 GB of available disk space Windows XP SP2 or higher operating system A webcam, microphone, and speakers A printer Other computer accessories may be required in the future Software: Internet Explorer 7.0 or higher Microsoft Office 2007 Professional to include: Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Publisher Updated anti-virus software Adobe Flash 9 or higher (Free Download at: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/ ) Acrobat 7 or higher (Free Download at: http://get.adobe.com/reader/ ) ITunes 7 or higher (Free Download at: http://www.apple.com/itunes/download/ ) Quicktime 7 or higher (Free Download at: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/ ) Other software, including upgrades, may be required in the future Connectivity: JANUARY 2010 Broadband Internet service (strongly recommended) Personal email address The technology requirements for the Networking Technology and Security Technology associate degree programs may be different. Online Course Expectations Online courses are structured to replicate the campus classroom. In the Online virtual classroom, faculty members present lectures, course materials, evaluations/tests, and interact with students through personal computers. The student interacts with other students and the instructor through messaging and discussion groups. 8 Students enrolled in an Online course are expected to participate in "classroom" activities including reading, lectures, participating in discussion groups, completing evaluations/test and processing information through reflective activities. In addition, students are required to complete homework, projects, assigned reading, research and preparation of weekly summaries "outside of the classroom". Levels of participation include active participation within groups or teams, interaction with the instructor, and the completion of course work by specified deadlines. To meet participation requirements, online learners are encouraged to sign on to class(es) five of seven days a week. Faculty members are available for additional course-related assistance and support. Students must meet the completion percentages set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts for each measuring point in the Chart. In general, credit hours in a program for which a student has incurred a financial obligation or for which financial aid funds have been disbursed will be considered attempted for purposes of measuring a student's rate of completion. However, credit hours awarded through examination and credit hours that do not count toward completion of the program of study in which the student is enrolled are not considered in evaluating SAP. Thus, credit hours for pre-college courses are not factored into this component of SAP because they do not count toward credits needed for graduation. Transfer credits are treated in accordance with Bryant & Stratton College's Transfer of Credit Policy. Students who do not successfully complete the minimum percentage of credits attempted for the given measuring point will be placed on probation or dismissed as set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts. Students who do not complete their studies within the MTF will not be awarded a credential. B. Qualitative Measurement Graduation Requirements Candidates for graduation must complete the following: Successfully complete the required courses prescribed by their curriculum. Maintain a minimum 2.0 (C) cumulative grade point average. Earn a minimum of 50 percent of the total credit hours required for their program, including 50 percent of the total credit hours required in their major area of study while attending as matriculated Bryant & Stratton College students. Complete the petition exit requirements set by the Academic, Career Services, and Business Offices. Fulfill all financial obligations, including tuition, fees, and other expenses, before their degrees or diplomas are granted. Grade transcripts and grade reports are issued when all financial obligations have been met. Students officially graduate from Bryant & Stratton College at the end of the semester in which they met all graduation requirements; however, formal commencement exercises are held annually. Students must maintain a minimum CGPA in relationship to the credits attempted and graded as indicated on the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts. If a student's CGPA does not meet the minimum requirement for a given measuring point, the student will be placed on probation, or dismissed as set forth in the Charts. The CGPA is determined by dividing the cumulative number of quality points (qualitative) awarded by the cumulative number of credits graded (credits for which the student has received grades of A, B, C, or F). The grading system is as follows: Grade A B C F W I T X P NP AU Z Point Value (per semester Grade credit) Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress I. Introduction Students must maintain satisfactory academic progress (SAP) toward completion of their program in order to remain in good academic standing and enrolled at the College. To ensure compliance with this policy, all students enrolled in degree programs will be measured by both quantitative and qualitative criteria at specific measuring points. On the quantitative side, students must maintain an adequate pace of progression toward completion of their degree in order to remain in good academic standing. On the qualitative side, students must maintain an adequate cumulative grade point average (CGPA) in order to remain in good academic standing. Superior - 90% and above Above Average - 80% to 89% Average - 70% - 79% Failure - 0% to 69% Withdrawal prior to the midpoint of the semester Incomplete Transfer (non-graded or prior to 9/2009) Credit by Examination Pass No pass Audit Grade not submitted 4 3 2 0 - II. Measuring Points and Minimum Requirements A. Quantitative Measurement To be in compliance with this standard, students must complete their program within 150% of the standard program length. The standard program length is the number of credit hours required for graduation from the program. For example, if an associate degree program requires 60 credits for graduation, then the standard program length is 60 and the MTF by which a student must successfully complete his or her program is 150% of the standard program length; 90 (1.5 x 60) attempted credit hours. Grades of P (Pass) and NP (No Pass) are assigned to pre-college courses that do not fulfill graduation requirements. Students who do not successfully complete a pre-college course upon their second attempt will be dismissed and cannot appeal to return for one year. Prior to 2009, the grade T is assigned to credit granted through transfer. JANUARY 2010 The quantitative measurement factor requires students to complete their programs within a maximum time frame. The maximum time frame (MTF) is based on a ratio of attempted credit hours to successfully completed credit hours expressed as the minimum percentage of credits a student must successfully complete at scheduled measuring points to maintain SAP. Attempted credit hours are those hours for which a student earns the grades of A, B, C, F, or W. (Credit hours for the grades of T, X, P, NP, and AU are recorded but are not considered attempted credits.). Successfully completed credit hours are those hours for which a student earns the grades of A, B, or C. The following grades do not apply to the calculation of grade point average (GPA): I Incomplete T Transfer (non-graded or prior to 9/2009) X Credit by Examination P Pass NP No pass AU Audit W Withdrawal M Military-related Withdrawal I grades are given only when students are making satisfactory progress, but for valid reasons are unable to complete the semester's work. Students must initiate arrangements with instructors and a Dean or their Academic Advisor to make up required work by the end of the first week of the following semester or the I grade will be replaced by the grade of F. Permission for additional time to complete the course requirements may only be granted by the chief academic official at the campus. 9 The grade X is assigned to credit granted through assessment or evaluation. The grade of W is assigned to course withdrawals made after the drop/add period and before the midpoint of the semester (or equivalent if the course does not meet for a full semester). The W grades are considered credit hours attempted and, as such, negatively impact the quantitative component of SAP. Students are cautioned to meet with an academic advisor prior to course withdrawal, since an accumulation of W grades may impact academic progress and their eligibility for financial aid. A student who withdraws from a course after the midpoint receives the grade of F. The grade of AU is assigned when permission to audit classes is granted. No grades or points are awarded. C. Effect of Incompletes, Withdrawals, Transfer Credits, M Credits, Credits Earned by Examination and Pre-College Credits on Satisfactory Academic Progress The Grade of F is considered graded credit hours attempted and does ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 60 67 CREDITS Credits Attempted Minimum CGPA Percentage of Consequences of Successfully Failure to Meet Completed Credits Standard 24 48 72 90 96 1.25 1.50 2.0 2.0 55% 60% 65% 67% Probation1 Dismissal Dismissal Degree cannot be awarded 2 ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 72 CREDITS Credits Attempted Minimum CGPA Percentage of Consequences of Successfully Failure to Meet Completed Credits Standard affect the grade point average (GPA) and academic progress. The grades of I, and W, as defined above, are not considered in calculating CGPA. However, the credits are considered attempted credits for purpose of assessing whether the student is progressing at a pace to graduate within the MTF. Grades of T and X are not considered in calculating either CGPA or completion pace because they are not credits earned from coursework completed at Bryant & Stratton College. M is not considered in calculating either CGPA or completion pace to ensure those students who withdraw to serve in the military for federally protected reasons are able to reenter Bryant & Stratton College in the same academic status they were in when they left. P and NP are not considered in calculating either CGPA or completion pace because they are applied to pre-college courses whose credits do not count toward completion of course credit requirements for any Bryant & Stratton College degree. D. SAP Measuring Points 24 48 72 96 108 1.25 1.50 2.0 2.0 2.0 55% 60% 65% 67% 67% Probation1 Dismissal Dismissal Dismissal Degree cannot be awarded BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS 120+ CREDITS Credits Attempted Minimum CGPA Percentage of Consequences of Successfully Failure to Meet Completed Credits Standard Students' SAP performance, both quantitative and qualitative, will be measured either at 24 attempted-credit intervals as set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts or at the set intervals set forth in the policy for specific students such as readmitted students. E. Transfer Credits In measuring SAP, transfer credits from institutions other than Bryant & Stratton College will be treated in accordance with Bryant & Stratton College's Transfer of Credit Policy. If transfer of credit is granted, the grade awarded is the grade earned from the prior institution. A student who proceeds from one academic program at Bryant & Stratton College to another at Bryant & Stratton College will not be considered a transfer student and will have any and all credits applicable to the new program counted as credit toward receiving a degree in the new program. Credits inapplicable to the new program will not be factored into the student's SAP. F. Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts 24 48 72 96 120 144 168 180 1.25 1.50 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 55% 60% 63% 63% 65% 65% 67% 67% Probation1 Probation1 Dismissal Dismissal Dismissal Dismissal Dismissal Degree cannot be awarded 1Note that at any measuring point where a student's CGPA and/or minimum number of credits successfully completed are so low that it is mathematically impossible for the student to meet SAP requirements by the next measurement interval, the student will be dismissed, rather than being placed on probation. 2A student in a 60-credit program will have his or her SAP measured for the JANUARY 2010 The following Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts set out the minimum CGPA and minimum percentages of attempted credits a student must successfully complete at each measuring point. Students who do not meet these requirements will be dismissed or placed on probation as set forth on the Chart. However, if at any measuring point, it is mathematically impossible for the student to restore satisfactory academic progress within the MTE the student will be dismissed from Bryant & Stratton College with the right to appeal even if the Chart would otherwise call for probation. last time at 90 credits (150% x 60); a student in a program with a program length of 62 credits will have his or her SAP measured for the last time at 93 credits (150% x 62); a student in a program with a program length of 63 credits will have his or her SAP measured for the last time at 95 credits (150% x 63); a student in a program with a program length of 67 credits will have his or her SAP measured at 96 credits and then again for the last time at 101 credits (150% x 67). *Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress are subject to change. Students will be informed of all changes prior to implementation. The charts are to be used in conjunction with any applicable additional criteria outlined in the policy. G. Consequences of Failure to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards 10 Failure to maintain quantitative and/or qualitative SAP standards at any measuring point or in accordance with the decision of the Academic Review Committee will result in probation or dismissal as indicated in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts and this policy. 1. Probation warning for the next semester, unless this policy would require the Probation is an academic status for a period of time measured by a certain number of attempted credits at the end of which a student must restore SAP in order to maintain Title IV financial aid eligibility and to avoid dismissal. If at the end of this time period, the student has restored SAP, the student is taken off probation and remains eligible for Title IV assistance. If the student fails to restore SAP by the end of this time period, the student is dismissed. When a student fails to meet SAP standards complete the minimum percentage of credit standard) attempted or by failing to maintain (qualitative standard), students are placed on either by failing to hours (quantitative the minimum CGPA academic probation student to be placed on probation or dismissed. 3. CGPA unless dismissal is mandatory as set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart or elsewhere in this policy. Probationary students are considered in good academic standing and are eligible for financial aid. However, if at any measuring point, the student's CGPA or rate of completion progression is so low such that it is mathematically impossible for the student to restore satisfactory academic progress by the next scheduled measuring point, the student will be dismissed regardless of whether the Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart would otherwise call for probation. Probationary students, in most cases, are permitted 24 attempted credits to restore SAP and remove the academic probation. However, if the number of attempted credits remaining in the student's MTF is less than 24 attempted credits, the probationary period is the number of credits remaining in the MTF. Restoration of SAP may be achieved by successfully completing the required minimum percentage of credits attempted and by raising the CGPA to levels at or above the minimums set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts at the time the student has completed his or her probationary period. Students who fail to restore SAP and thus remove the academic probation at the time they have completed their probationary period will lose good academic standing and will be dismissed. In addition, students whose academic performance at the end of any semester during the probationary period is such that it would be impossible for them to restore their SAP by the time they have completed their probationary period will lose good academic standing and will be dismissed. 2. Dismissal Any student who falls below a 2.0 CGPA ("C" average) during a given semester will be placed on academic warning for the next semester, unless this policy would require the student to be placed on probation or dismissed. Any student who, at the end of a semester, which is not a measuring point on the Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart, achieves a CGPA or progress percentage sufficiently low such that if it had been a measuring point would have resulted in the student not meeting SAP standards will be placed on academic warning for the next semester, unless this policy would require the student to be placed on probation or dismissed. 4. Completion of Probation: All students on probation will be placed on academic warning for the semester following their successful completion of their probationary period and will be notified of their status by regular mail and/or e-mail. I. Appeal H. Academic Warning Academic Warning is a written agreement between students who are in danger of failing to meet SAP requirements. 1. First Semester Students: Any first-semester student who accumulates two (2) or more grades of F or W or earns a GPA for that first semester of less than 2.0 will be placed on academic warning for the next semester, unless this policy would require the student to be placed on probation or dismissed. 2. Withdrawal: Any student who withdraws from three (3) or more courses during a given semester will be placed on academic 11 JANUARY 2010 Students will be dismissed if: a. They are previously dismissed students who have successfully appealed their dismissal due to mitigating circumstances, have been readmitted under probation, and have failed to meet the minimal SAP standards necessary to remove them from probationary status at the time they have attempted 12 credits after readmission. In addition, if at any time while the student is in this probationary status, the student earns an F in any course or the student's SAP is such that it would be mathematically impossible for him to restore his SAP by the time the student completes what is remaining of the 12 additional attempted credits, the student is dismissed. b. Their SAP performance calls for dismissal in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Charts. Such students will be dismissed without benefit of probationary status; c. They have failed to restore their SAP and thus remove their probationary status at the time they have completed their probationary period or d. At a measuring point that would otherwise call for probation, they have achieved a CGPA and/or progress rate sufficiently low such that it is mathematically impossible for the student to restore SAP by the next measuring point. Students may appeal a decision to dismiss for failure to meet SAP standards and they may appeal determinations of failure to meet SAP standards. Students must submit such appeals to a Dean or their Academic Advisor within seven (7) calendar days of the date of notification of the decision to dismiss or of the date of notification of failure to meet SAP standards. Students who require additional time may request an extension which will be granted at the discretion of the Academic Review Committee. Students submitting such appeals must establish either 1) mitigating circumstances prevented them from achieving the required SAP standing; or 2) a mathematical error resulted in an inaccurate determination that they failed to achieve the required SAP standing. Mitigating circumstances are those that are beyond the student's control, such as: 1) serious illness or injury to student that required extended recovery time; 2) death or serious illness of an immediate family member; 3) significant trauma in the student's life that impaired the student's emotional and /or physical health. Each appeal submitted to a Dean or Academic Advisor must be accompanied with documented proof of mitigating circumstances or the alleged mathematical error, along with an appeal statement explaining why the student believes the appeal should be granted. Documented proof of mitigating circumstances should include signed letters or statements from relevant third parties, signed letters or statements from a medical doctor, death certificates or obituaries, or other documentation establishing or corroborating the mitigating circumstances. The Dean or Academic Advisor then forwards the appeal to the Academic Review Committee. The Academic Review Committee then evaluates the appeal and attempts to render a decision within seven calendar days of the Committee's receipt of the appeal. If an appeal is granted, the student will be permitted to enroll in a matriculated status. Appeals granted due to mitigating circumstances are, in effect, a suspension of Bryant & Stratton College's published SAP standards for that student. However, the academic transcript of the student will not change as a result of a successful appeal unless mathematical error is proved. The Academic Review Committee, in decisions granting mitigating circumstances appeals, will set out the particular academic requirements the student must meet and the time frame in which the student must meet them to maintain SAP and to complete the degree program in which the student is enrolled. All students who prevail in a mitigating circumstance appeal will be on probation for the number of attempted credits designated by the Academic Review Committee which will not exceed 24 attempted credits. A student who prevails in an appeal may be paid Pell and Campusbased funds for the payment period in which he/she resumes SAP. For Stafford and PLUS loans, the student regains eligibility for the entire period of enrollment in which the student again meets SAP standards. Decisions of the Academic Review Committee are final. J. Multi-Degree Status Students Students petitioning for multi-degree status, who have not yet graduated from their primary-degree program, will be subject to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart that applies to their primarydegree program. Once such students have graduated from their primary-degree program and have been re-classified to their secondarydegree program, they will be subject to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart that applies to their secondary-degree program. The credits already attempted in the student's primary-degree program that will be credited toward the secondary-degree program will be considered in assessing SAP in the secondary-degree program. Thus, the first measuring point for students entering a secondary-degree program will be that which applies after taking into account the attempted credits credited from the primary-degree program. K. Students Who Apply for Readmission After Withdrawal Due to Service in Uniformed Services of the Department of Defense) who did not give advance written or verbal notice of service to the appropriate official at Bryant & Stratton College as set forth above, may meet the notice requirement by submitting, at the time the student seeks readmission, a written attestation to Bryant & Stratton College that the student performed service in the uniformed services that necessitated the student's absence from Bryant & Stratton College. A student who submits an application for readmission shall provide to Bryant & Stratton College documentation to establish that: 1) the student was required to withdraw from Bryant & Stratton College because of service in the uniformed services (written orders may meet this requirement); 2) the student has not exceeded the service limitations established under this section; and 3) the student's eligibility for readmission has not been terminated due to separation from the Armed Services due to a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge; a dismissal of such person permitted under section 1161(a) of title 10, United States Code; or a dropping of such person from the rolls pursuant to section 1161(b) of title 10, United States Code. Bryant & Stratton College will not delay or attempt to avoid a readmission of a student under this section by demanding documentation that does not exist, or is not readily available, at the time of readmission. A student's eligibility for readmission to an institution of higher education under this section by reason of such student's service in the uniformed services terminates upon the occurrence of any of the following events: 1) a separation of such person from the Armed Forces (including the National Guard and Reserves) with a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge; 2) a dismissal of such person permitted under section 1161(a) of title 10, United States Code; or 3) a dropping of such person from the rolls pursuant to section 1161(b) of title 10, United States Code. A student who is readmitted to Bryant & Stratton College under this section will be readmitted with the same academic status as such student had when such student last attended the College. Students who provide to Bryant & Stratton College advance written notice with documentation, such as written orders, establishing that they must withdraw from Bryant & Stratton College by reason of service in the uniformed services will receive the grade of M for courses they were unable to finish as a result of the service in the uniformed services. Students who are exempt from the advance notice requirement under the terms of this section may receive the grade of M for these courses upon request if they are eligible and granted readmission under this section. L. Nursing Program A student who is a member of, applies to be a member of, performs, has performed, applies to perform, or has an obligation to perform, "service in the uniformed services" who must withdraw from Bryant & Stratton College by reason of service in the uniformed services will be entitled to readmission to Bryant & Stratton College if: 1) the student (or an appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or official of the Department of Defense) gives advance written or verbal notice of such service to the DCAA; 2) the cumulative length of the absence and of all previous absences from Bryant & Stratton College by reason of service in the uniformed services does not exceed five years; and 3) the student submits a notification of intent to reenroll in Bryant & Stratton College no later than three years after the completion of the period of service, except as stated below. The term "service in the uniformed services" means service (whether voluntary or involuntary) on active duty in the Armed Forces, including such service by a member of the National Guard or Reserve, for a period of more than 30 days under a call or order to active duty of more than 30 days. In calculating the cumulative length of the absence and all previous absences, the following time in service will be excluded: 1) service that is required, beyond five years, to complete an initial period of obligated service during which the student was unable to obtain orders releasing such student from a period of service in the uniformed services before the expiration of such five-year period and such inability was through no fault of such student; 2) service performed by a member of the Armed Forces (including the National Guard and Reserves) who is (a) ordered to or retained on active duty under section 688, 12301(a), 12301(g), 12302, 12304, or 12305 of title 10, United States Code, or under section 331, 332, 359, 360, 367, or 712 of title 14, United States Code, (b) ordered to or retained on active duty (other than for training) under any provision of law because of a war or national emergency declared by the President or the Congress, as determined by the Secretary concerned, (c) ordered to active duty (other than for training) in support, as determined by the Secretary concerned, of an operational mission for which personnel have been ordered to active duty under section 12304 of title 10, United States Code, (d) ordered to active duty in support, as determined by the Secretary concerned, of a critical mission or requirement of the Armed Forces (including the National Guard or Reserve), or (e) called into Federal service as a member of the National Guard under chapter 15 of title 10, United States Code, or section 12406 of title 10, United States Code. JANUARY 2010 Students in the nursing program must meet not only SAP standards set forth in this Catalog, but additional academic requirements which are more rigorous than those described here. Students in the nursing program must maintain the SAP standards in this Catalog to remain a student with Bryant & Stratton College. However, to remain a student in the nursing program, the student must also meet the academic standards for the nursing degree program, which are set forth in the Nursing Program Student Handbook. Failure to meet the nursing program academic standards will result in a student's release from the nursing program, but not from Bryant & Stratton College if the student has met Bryant & Stratton's SAP standards set forth in this policy. M. Grade Questions and Challenges In addition, if the student is hospitalized for or convalescing from an illness or injury incurred or aggravated during the performance of service in the uniformed services, notice of intent to reenroll must be submitted no later than two years after the end of the period that is necessary for recovery from such illness or injury. No advance written or verbal notice will be required if the giving of such notice is precluded by military necessity, such as 1) a mission, operation, exercise, or requirement that is classified; or 2) a pending or ongoing mission, operation, exercise, or requirement that may be compromised or otherwise adversely affected by public knowledge. Also, a student (or an appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or official The Academic Office, upon completion of each semester, issues final grade reports. Transcripts are maintained in a permanent academic database indefinitely. Students with questions or challenges about any grade should first contact the instructor no later than two (2) weeks after the issuance of grades. Students challenging grades must complete a Grade Challenge form and submit it to a Dean or their Academic Advisor within two (2) weeks after the issuance of grades. The grade challenge will be investigated, and the decision of the instructor and the Dean or Academic Advisor to 12 whom the challenge was submitted will be final. In cases of disagreement between the instructor and the Dean or Advisor, the Campus Director will make the final decision. A grade challenge is distinct from and different than an SAP appeal, as discussed above. N. Grade Determination/Unit of Credit Technology Requirements for Networking Technology and Security Technology Associate Degree Programs Students who enroll in either the Networking Technology or Security Technology associate degree programs are required to have the following technology resources. The minimum system requirements for upper level courses in these programs are: Core2Duo processor; 2GB RAM; Wireless G or N card; 100Mbps Ethernet Connection (wired LAN); minimum 160GB disk drive; Optical media CDRW/DVD (Able to record CDROM, play DVD, read DVD data); Webcam; 4 hour battery capacity; Audio capability/sound enabled/line-in/line-out; Windows XP SP2 or SP3; Microsoft Office Professional (2007 or better); Working Antivirus Subscription; Lojack for laptops (or other antitheft mechanism, such as a laptop leash/security cable). High-speed internet access via FIOS, DSL, satellite, or cable is recommended for online courses. Class participation, homework, assessments and evaluations, projects, and examinations are factored into final grades. All subjects are evaluated in terms of semester credit hours. A semester credit hour is based upon the semester calendar which is divided into terms of 15 weeks including final assessment/examination periods. One semester unit of credit is equivalent to 15 fifty-minute hours of classroom lecture/discussion and outside preparation, 30 fifty-minute hours of laboratory/study, or 45 fifty-minute hours of internship or a combination of all three. O. Program Changes Students who wish to change their program of study at any time during their enrollment at Bryant & Stratton College must make an appointment with their academic advisor. The academic advisor will help them determine which of their already-completed courses will apply to their new program choice and will recalculate their expected date of graduation. In addition, students should also meet with a Financial Services advisor who will help them determine their eligibility based on the new program choice. The Dean will review the program change request and will make a decision based upon the student's academic progress and program availability. P. Withdrawal Procedure Virtual Library Bryant & Stratton College's Virtual Library supports the educational programs of the College by meeting the critical information needs of students, faculty, staff, and alumni. The Virtual Library is a gateway to reference materials and program resources including a broad array of full-text and academic online databases to support programs of study. Academic reference librarians are available to assist students either in person or online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Bryant & Stratton College's Virtual Library also provides access to electronic books, select web resources, tutorials, and course reserve materials. Students intending to withdraw from any number of classes should give written notice of their withdrawal to the Academic Office in order to ensure the withdrawals are officially recorded and the students' records are updated. Official withdrawal will only be accepted once the necessary paperwork is completed and approved by the Academic Office for any and all courses dropped. Except for students of the Wisconsin campuses, no refund of tuition will be granted to a full- or part-time student who does not officially withdraw from a course(s), regardless of whether a student continues in other courses at the College. Non-attendance in a course does not constitute an official withdrawal. Refunds for official withdrawals will be based on the Refund Policy listed in this catalog as well as the Student Guide. Q. Changes to Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards Online Tutoring (SMARTHINKING ) Bryant & Stratton College offers students real-time, 24/7 online tutorial support through SMARTHINKING. Every year, students may access free tutoring in math, accounting, economics, statistics and biology. Attached to SMARTHINKING is the Online Writing Lab (OWL) where students can submit College essays, career documents, or any writing assignment for critique and it is returned within 24 hours. TM Degree Plus The Degree Plus program complements the degree program outcomes with a review in preparation for a certification exam, providing students with the opportunity to graduate from the college with a degree plus a third-party certification that is recognized in their professional field. According to employers, this program verifies technical skills and competence giving students a competitive edge. The Degree Plus feature is available with selected degree programs. The cost of the certification review training is offered at no additional charge to the student, and depending on the certification exam, the exam fee may be partially or fully covered. To learn more about which programs have the Degree Plus feature, and the associated certification exam, please see an academic advisor or program director for more details. Bryant & Stratton reserves the right to change its SAP standards at any time. Any time such a change is made, all students will be notified prior to the new standards taking effect. Achieve Program "Ability to Benefit" Students The U.S. Department of Education requires that students who want to receive federal financial aid and who do not have a high school diploma or a GED demonstrate their "ability to benefit" from college studies. Bryant & Stratton College offers an Achieve Program that allows eligible "ability to benefit" students to prepare for a Graduate Equivalency Diploma (GED). Please consult with academic and financial aid advisors regarding eligibility and academic requirements associated with the Achieve Program. Independent Study GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE JANUARY 2010 A student may be eligible to take a course through Independent Study in the rare instance that a campus based or Online course is not available to the student and s/he needs the course to fulfill the degree plan requirements in a timely manner. The student must meet all academic requirements of the course and the scheduling requirements associated with this option. The details of this option are available through the Dean. First Year Experience Bryant & Stratton College realizes reasonable people may disagree. When this occurs, our policy provides a systematic and equitable process to resolve grievances. A grievance is defined as "an issue or complaint between a student and the College (or its associates) with respect to the application of rules, policies, procedures, or regulations which arise over issues other than grade appeals, academic suspensions and dismissals, and disciplinary actions which are dealt with differently as described elsewhere in this catalog." Students with grievances must raise their concerns to the Dean or their designee within fourteen (14) days of the event that gave rise to the grievance or notice of the matter which is being grieved in order to ensure that the matter is properly addressed in a timely fashion. Where a person or parties have a complaint or issue, it should be addressed in accordance with the following: 1. Classroom Matters: Students with grievances related to classroom matters should first discuss their concerns with the instructor The First Year Experience (FYE) is a graded group advising seminar focusing on the academic, career and lifetime success for students. Modules are delivered throughout the semester to support the academic progress and social transaction that is vital to the college experience. 13 involved and/or with their academic advisor. If the matter is not resolved, students may bring the complaint to the attention of the Dean who will contact all parties involved in an attempt to resolve the complaint. 2. Other Academic Matters: Students with grievances about academic matters not related to the classroom should first discuss their concerns with their academic advisor and/or the Dean, who will contact all parties involved in an attempt to resolve the complaint. 3. Non-Academic Matters: Students with grievances about nonacademic matters should first discuss their concerns with a member of the academic staff who will act as a clearing house and will arrange for an informal discussion of the grievance with the appropriate departmental supervisor (Business Office Director, Dean, etc.). 4. Harassment/Discrimination: Students alleging sexual harassment or discrimination should contact their Dean, Business Director or Campus Director who will attempt to resolve the complaint or may opt to follow the Formal Grievance Procedure. INFORMAL GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE Within fourteen (14) days of the meeting, or as soon as practicable, the Dean or their designee, will issue a report and recommendation(s) for resolution to the Campus Director. The Campus Director will review the recommendations from the Dean or their designee, and send a written decision to the student raising the complaint or issue within fourteen (14) days, or as soon as practicable, of the meeting. In Virginia, students dissatisfied with the Director's decision, or part of it, must give written notice of a demand for arbitration within thirty (30) days of mailing of the Director's resolution decision to the student. Any failure to act within the thirty (30) days as required shall render the Director's resolution decision final. The demand for arbitration shall contain a description of each item of relief sought by the student. Upon receipt of an arbitration demand, the College shall promptly notify the American Arbitration Association. The arbitration will be carried out pursuant to the Commercial Arbitration Rules of the American Arbitration Association before a single arbitrator. The arbitration shall take place in the city or county where the branch of the College attended by the aggrieved student is located. The student and the College shall initially share equally the AAA fee and the costs of the arbitration, reserving to the arbitrator the right to assess part or all of the costs, expenses and fees against either party. The decision of the arbitrator shall be final and enforceable in any court with jurisdiction over the parties. In Wisconsin, students who are dissatisfied with the resolution of their grievances or who believe Bryant & Stratton College has not properly addressed their concerns may contact the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board, 30 West Mifflin Sweet, 9th Floor, Madison, WI 53703, telephone 608/266-1996. In New York State, students who are dissatisfied with the decision or who believe Bryant & Stratton College has not properly addressed their concerns may request a complaint form in writing or by telephone from the New York State Education Department, Postsecondary Complaint Registry, One Park Avenue, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10016, telephone 212/951-6493. In Ohio, students who are dissatisfied with the decision may contact the Ohio Board of Regents, 30 East Broad Street, 36th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215-3414. It is often possible to resolve an issue or complaint through a voluntary conversation between persons or parties involved. Therefore, the purpose of this Informal Procedure is to discuss the complaint or issue, which may be facilitated by any College official or employee. Any person or party involved in the issue or complaint may be accompanied by another person of their choice for support and guidance during this discussion. If, after this discussion, the persons or parties involved feel that a resolution has been achieved, the matter may remain confidential. The facilitator shall report, in writing, the issue/complaint raised and the resolution to the issue/complaint to the Campus Director within five (5) days of the discussion. No further actions will be taken. If any party is not satisfied with the Informal Grievance Procedure, he/she may proceed to the Formal Grievance Procedure. Any complaint against a College employee shall be handled through the Formal Grievance Procedure. FORMAL GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE The Formal Grievance Procedure may be used when persons or parties are unwilling to reach agreement through the Informal Grievance Procedure. This procedure would be initiated when one of the persons or parties involved in the matter at issue sends a complaint, in writing, to a Dean or their designee within ten (10) days of the discussion taking place under the Informal Grievance Procedure or within fourteen (14) days of the event that gave rise to the grievance or notice of the matter which is being grieved. Complaints presented must be in writing and should include all supporting documentation, names of witness(es) or other evidence that the complaining person or party believes supports his/her position. The person or party will be informed of the complaint within three (3) days of receipt of the complaint by the Dean or designee. That person or party will have three (3) days to submit, in writing, any documentation including names of witness(es) or other evidence supporting his/her position. Once the Dean or designee receives the written complaint and supporting information, the Dean or their designee, will notify the persons or parties raising the issue or complaint of a time, date and location for a meeting to review the matter. The meeting will be scheduled to occur within fourteen (14) days of receipt of the written complaint. The persons or parties involved in this matter may also request documentation or evidence from any other parties who are named in the complaint or who have first-hand knowledge which might aid in the resolution of the complaint. The Dean or their designee, may also request that other parties involved in the complaint appear at this or at a subsequent meeting (that need not be in the presence of the parties involved in the Grievance). Non-Discrimination, Non-Harassment and Non-Retaliation Policy Bryant & Stratton College is committed to maintaining an environment where all students are treated with respect and dignity. Title IX of the Educational Amendments is a federal statute which prohibits sex discrimination in education and states that no person on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. Bryant & Stratton College expressly prohibits any form of unlawful discrimination or harassment based on race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability, marital status, citizenship status, veteran status, genetic predisposition, carrier status or any other lawfully protected status. The College also does not tolerate any actual or attempted reprisals or retaliation against any individual who raises a sincere and valid concern regarding harassment or discrimination. All such discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation is, therefore, strictly prohibited. This policy protects and covers the conduct of all individuals at the College without regard to job title or status, including managers, faculty, supervisors, associates, coworkers, students, vendors, or visitors. Anyone engaging in the above mentioned conduct is subject to disciplinary action up to and including discharge or termination of any other status. Harassment that is forbidden by this policy can take several forms, including but not limited to: 14 JANUARY 2010 Sexual Harassment Sexual harassment can take two forms: quid pro quo and hostile environment. Quid pro quo harassment occurs when a College employee causes a student to believe that he or she must submit to unwelcome sexual conduct in order to participate in a College program or activity. It can also occur when an employee causes a student to believe that the employee will make an educational decision based on whether or not the student submits to unwelcome sexual conduct. Hostile environment harassment occurs when unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it affects a student's ability to participate in or benefit from an education program or activity, or creates an intimidating, threatening or abusive education environment. A hostile environment can be created by a College employee, another student, or even someone visiting the College, such as a student or employee from another College. While not exhaustive, the following is a list of some examples of conduct which may constitute sexual harassment: Threatening to fail a student unless the student agrees to date the teacher. Offering employment or educational benefits in exchange for sexual favors. Making or threatening reprisals after a negative response to sexual advances. Graphic verbal comments about an individual's body or appearance. Unwelcome sexual flirtations or propositions for sexual activity. Unwelcome demands for or suggestions of sexual favors, including but not limited to repeated unwelcome requests for dates. Spreading sexual rumors. Touching an individual's body or clothes (including one's own) in a sexual way, including, but not limited to, grabbing, brushing against, patting, pinching, bumping, rubbing, kissing, and fondling. Cornering or blocking of normal movements. Displaying or sending sexually suggestive drawings, images, pictures, written materials, cartoons, letters, notes and objects in the work/educational environment, regardless of the medium. The College will not tolerate verbal conduct such as sexual harassment between members of the same or opposite sex. Harassment based on race, color, creed, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability, marital status, citizenship status, veteran status, genetic predisposition, carrier status or any other lawfully protected status can include any severe or continued verbal, written, or physical activity where such protected categories are used to make an individual uncomfortable or interferes with the ability to perform his or her job or academic studies. The College will not tolerate any harassment including the following: Posting or distributing cartoons, drawings, or any other material that negatively reflects a person's race, color, religion, national origin, age, marital status, Vietnam Era or disabled veteran status, disability or any other category protected by law, regardless of medium. The use of slurs or other offensive language. Practical jokes, horseplay, or teasing that mocks or insults a person's race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, marital status, Vietnam Era or disabled veteran status, disability or membership in any other category protected by law, regardless of medium. Some conduct, even though consensual, may violate the harassment policy because it creates a hostile environment for others (e.g. a thirdparty overhearing a joke). Further, although sexual harassment is limited to unwelcome actions; private, personal, consensual conduct may at some point become unwelcome. successfully end the harassment, the individual should notify his/her Dean, Business Director, and/or Campus Director (the College's designated "Complaint Officers.") When a complaint is first received by a supervisor other than a Complaint Officer, that person shall relay the complaint to a Complaint Officer immediately but no later than seven (7) days. In the event that one Complaint Officer is the offender, the reporting employee shall report his/her complaint to any other. All such reports will remain confidential, to the extent possible, during the investigatory process. Any student who believes s/he is being harassed may report a complaint. The incident will be investigated pursuant to the Grievance Procedure section of this catalog. Both the complainant and the accused will be informed of the outcome of the investigation. Based upon the results of the Grievance Procedure, immediate and corrective action will be taken, up to and including termination of the offender's employment or status in accordance with legal guidelines. Such conduct may result in an individual having to obtain his or her own legal counsel, in a money judgment against the individual personally, or the filing of criminal charges. Any remedial action will be tailored to fully address the specific problem. The severity of the incident and the age of the parties will be calculated to stop the specific harassment and prevent recurrences. Federal and state law and College policy prohibit retaliation for filing a discrimination or harassment complaint, testifying, assisting, or participating in any way in an investigation of such a complaint. If you believe you have been retaliated against, you should follow the College's complaint procedures. Disability Discrimination Policy Bryant & Stratton College prohibits discrimination and protects its students from discrimination. In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the College has designated a Section 504 Coordinator at each campus. Any student with a question concerning services due to a disability should contact the Dean or designee. Additionally, any student with a complaint concerning disability discrimination should follow the Formal Grievance Procedure. Step 1: Students who feel they have been discriminated against because of a disability should file a complaint with their academic advisor or with the Section 504 coordinator within ten (10) business days of the precipitating event. A meeting will be arranged between the aggrieved student and any appropriate member of the campus community. Data and facts relating to the complaint will be collected in an attempt to resolve the complaint. If the decision meets with the approval of the student, no further action will be taken and the records will remain confidential. If the situation is not resolved, the student should submit a formal written complaint to the Section 504 coordinator within thirty (30) business days of the precipitating event or thirty (30) days of the student's becoming aware of the alleged violation, If the student is not satisfied with the results of the informal complaint process, s/he may ask that a formal investigation be conducted within the appropriate time constraints. JANUARY 2010 Step 2: Following receipt of the formal grievance, the Section 504 coordinator will take all necessary action to resolve the matter. This will include arranging a meeting with the student, the accused, and the appropriate academic manager. A formal response will be made to the student within twenty (20) business days of the receipt of the formal grievance. If this solution does not satisfy the student, the matter will be referred to the Campus Director. Step 3: The student will be advised to make an appointment with the Campus Director for final resolution of the issue. The Campus Director will meet with the student within five (5) business days of receipt of the request and will return a decision within ten (10) business days of the meeting. Reporting and Investigating Complaints The College encourages individuals who believe they are being harassed to clearly and promptly notify the offender that his or her behavior is unwelcome. If for any reason an individual does not wish to confront the offender directly or if such a confrontation does not 15 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Student Right-to-Know In compliance with the Department of Education's Student Right of 1974 to Know Act, Bryant & Stratton College offers an electronic All Bryant & Stratton College students shall have the right to inspect and review their educational records, to request corrections or deletions, and to limit disclosure of the records in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, also referred to as the Buckley Amendment. Specifically, students have the right to: SRK Directory with the required performance results, policies and information. Prospective students, enrolled students and staff will find the SRK Directory on the College's web site at http://ss.bryantstratton.edu/market/online_srtk.htm. (1) inspect and review their education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed; (2) request the amendment of their education records that s/he believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the College to amend a record should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested, the College will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student's right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing; (3) provide written consent before the College discloses personally identifiable information from the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The College discloses education records without a student's prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to College officials with legitimate educational interests. A College official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of using College employees or officials (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Directors; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another College official in performing his or her tasks. A College official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the College. Upon request, the College also discloses education records without consent to officials of another College in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. (4) file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901 Bryant & Stratton College will generally release certain student directory information to the public. Such information could include some or all of the following data: student's name, address(es), phone listing, date and place of birth, program, dates of attendance, photograph, post-graduation employer and job title, participation in activities and recognition received, and the most recent previous secondary and postsecondary institution attended by the student. Students who do not wish to have any part or all of this information released should inform the College of their wishes in writing. Additionally, Bryant & Stratton College reserves the right to release to police agencies and/or crime victims any records or information pertinent to a crime which has occurred on campus, including the details of and disciplinary action taken against the alleged perpetrator of the crime. Campus Security In compliance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, information about Bryant & Stratton College's campus security policies and procedures and crime statistics is made available to students and to employees on an annual basis, and upon request, to any applicant for employment or enrollment. Campus crime statistics can be obtained by visiting the website of the United States Department of Education at http://ope.ed.gov/security/search.asp. Bryant & Stratton College is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for all members of the campus community. Information on campus crime is available in the Admissions Department and is published and issued each fall. Students and employees on a particular campus may also call the Campus Director. Substance Abuse Policy Bryant and Stratton College recognizes that the misuse of drugs, alcohol and/or tobacco is a serious problem with legal, physical, emotional and social implications for the entire College community. Therefore, the consumption, sharing, distribution, selling, use, possession of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, illegal, counterfeit and designer drugs, or paraphernalia for the use of such drugs is prohibited at any College sponsored event or on College property at all times. The inappropriate use of prescription and over-the-counter drugs is also prohibited. Persons shall be banned from entering College grounds or College-sponsored events when exhibiting behavioral, personal, or physical characteristics indicative of having used or consumed alcohol or drugs (illegal or through the inappropriate use) or other substances. The College's Student Code of Conduct outlines the disciplinary measures for students in violation of the Substance Abuse Policy. Code of Student Conduct/Dismissal Policy Students should conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the College's educational mission. The term "student" includes all persons taking courses at the College, either full-time or part-time. Persons who withdraw after allegedly violating the Student Code, who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but who have a continuing relationship with the College or who have been notified of their acceptance for admission are considered "students." This Student Code applies at all locations of the College. A. Rules and Regulations Students may be dismissed or suspended from Bryant & Stratton College for disciplinary or academic reasons, including but not limited to: 1. Acts of dishonesty, including but not limited to the following: a. Cheating, plagiarism, multiple submission, sabotage, collaboration, falsification, bribery or use of purchased reports, theft, damage or misuse of library or computer resources, or other forms of academic dishonesty. The term "plagiarism" includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. The term "cheating" includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) use of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the College faculty or staff 16 JANUARY 2010 (4) engaging in any behavior specifically prohibited by a faculty member in the course syllabus or class discussion. b. Furnishing false information to any College official. c. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any College document, record, or instrument of identification. 2. Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings or other College activity, (including an on or off campus) service function or authorized non-college event held on the college premises. 3. Physical abuse, verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion, and/or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person. This includes any violation of the College's Non-Discrimination, Non-Harassment and NonRetaliation policy. 4. Attempted or actual theft of or damage to College property or property of a member of the College community, or other personal or public property either on or off College premise. The term "College premises" includes all land, buildings, facilities, and other property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the College (including adjacent streets and sidewalks). 5. Hazing that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or the destruction or removal of public or private property, for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or a condition for continued membership in, group or organization. The express or implied consent of the victim will not be a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of hazing are not neutral acts; they are violations of this rule. 6. Failure to comply with directions of College officials or law enforcement officers acting in performance of their duties or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so. 7. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys to any College premises or unauthorized entry to or use of College premises. 8. Violation of any College policy, rule, or regulation published in hard copy or available electronically on the College website. 9. Violation of any federal, state or local law. 10. Use, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of marijuana, heroin, narcotics, or other controlled substances except as expressly permitted by law. 11. Use, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by College regulations), or public intoxication. Alcoholic beverages may not, in any circumstance, be used by, possessed by, or distributed to any person under twenty-one (21) years of age. 12. Drunken or disorderly behavior on College property or at functions sponsored or supervised by the College. 13. Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms, explosives or other weapons, or dangerous chemicals on College premises. In the event a student is licensed or otherwise permitted to carry a firearm and is required to carry a firearm even while off duty as a condition of his or her employment or service, prior to coming to campus with the firearm, the individual should present evidence of the licensure and evidence of the requirement to carry the firearm even while off-duty, so that the College can validate such a request. For Ohio students only, students who are licensed to carry a concealed firearm may only maintain them in a locked motor vehicle or be in the immediate process of placing the firearm in a locked motor vehicle. 14. Participating in an on-campus or off-campus demonstration, riot, or activity that disrupts the normal operations of the College or infringes on the rights of other members of the College community; leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled or normal activities within any campus building or area. 15. Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College premises or at College-sponsored or supervised functions. 16. Conduct that is disorderly, lewd, or indecent; breach of peace; or aiding, abetting, or procuring another person to breach the peace on College premises, or at functions sponsored by, or participated in by, the College or members of the academic community. Disorderly Conduct includes but is not limited to: any unauthorized use of electronic or other devices to make an audio or video record of any person while on College premises without his/her prior knowledge or effective consent when such a recording is likely to cause injury or distress. This includes, but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person in a gym, locker room, or restroom. 17. Theft or other abuse of the College's electronic or computer facilities and resources, including but not limited to: a. Unauthorized entry into a file. b. Unauthorized transfer of a file. c. Use of another individual's identification and/or password. d. Use of electronic or computing facilities and resources to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member or College Official. e. Use of electronic or computing facilities and resources to send obscene or abusive messages. f. Use of electronic or computing facilities and resources to interfere with normal operation of the College computing system. g. Use of electronic or computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws. h. Any violation of the College Computer Use Policy. i. Use of electronic or computing facilities and resources for purposes other than education, academic, administrative, or research purposes of the College. 18. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person including oneself, on College property or at functions sponsored or supervised by the College. This includes, but is not limited to: a. Causing or creating fire; b. Tampering with safety measures or devices, including, but not limited to alarm systems, fire exit signs, emergency phone systems, smoke or heat detectors, fire hoses, security systems, doors, etc. c. Failing to conform to safety regulations, including, but not limited to falsely reporting or circulating a false report of an incident (e.g. bomb, fire, or other emergency), falsely reporting the use or possession of a firearm or explosive, or failing to evacuate facilities in a timely fashion in emergency situations or in response to fire alarms. 19. Unauthorized use or misuse of College property, including, but not limited to attempting to leave the library with library materials which have not been properly borrowed, unauthorized use of computer equipment, or misuse of College telephones. 20. Failure to report to the Campus Director, Dean or local law enforcement agencies any knowledge of criminal activity on campus, including but not limited to murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, or motor vehicle theft. Such a report shall be provided in a manner that is timely and that will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences. 21. Violation of College policies, procedures, or regulations. 22. The illegal use, possession of, or tampering with safety equipment on College property. 23. Giving false testimony or evidence at any official College hearing. 24. Violations of the conditions of a sanction imposed through College disciplinary procedures. 25. Smoking in any indoor College buildings except in private suites and rooms in the residence halls that are duly designated as "smoking." Smoking is also prohibited within thirty feet (30') of exterior ventilation intake, within ten feet (10') of building entrances and open windows, and in all exterior stairwells. 26. Failing to comply with any College policy, procedure, guideline, or regulation regarding the registration of student organizations in the use of College facilities or regulation regarding the possession of motor vehicles on campus. 27. Failure to abide by residence hall policies, procedures, guidelines, and regulations. 28. Any abuse of the College Student Judicial System, including, but not limited to: a. Failure to obey the summons of a judicial body or College official; 17 JANUARY 2010 b. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a judicial body; c. Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a judicial proceeding; d. Knowingly instituting a judicial referral without cause; e. Attempting to discourage an individual's proper participation in, or use of, the judicial system; f. Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a judicial body prior to and/or during a judicial proceeding; g. Verbal or physical harassment or intimidation of a member of a judicial body prior to, during, or after a judicial proceeding; h. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Bryant & Stratton College Code of Student Conduct/Dismissal Policy; i. Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the judicial system. 29. Engaging in social conduct that reflects poorly upon the College. Violation of Law and College Discipline A. College disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with conduct that potentially violates both the criminal law and this Student Code (that is, if both possible violations result from the same factual situation) without regard to the pendency of civil or criminal litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Proceedings under this Student Conduct may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or, following civil or criminal proceedings off campus at the discretion of the Student Code Administrator. Determinations made or sanctions imposed under this Student Code shall not be subject to change because criminal charges arising out of the same facts giving rise to violation of College rules were dismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor of or against the criminal law defendant. B. Charges and Student Conduct Board Hearings. 1. Any member of the College community may file charges against a student for violations of the Student Code. Any charge should be submitted as soon as possible after the event takes place, preferably within fourteen (14) days. A charge shall be prepared in writing and directed to the Student Conduct Administrator. The term "Student Conduct Administrator" means a College official authorized on a case-by-case basis by the Campus Director to impose sanctions upon any student(s) found to have violated the Student Code. The Campus Director may authorize a Student Conduct Administrator to serve simultaneously as a Student Conduct Administrator and the sole member or one of the members of the Student Conduct Board. The Campus Director may authorize the same Student Conduct Administrator to impose sanctions in all cases. 2. The Student Conduct Administrator may conduct an investigation to determine if the charges have merit or if they can be disposed of administratively by mutual consent of the parties involved on a basis acceptable to the Student Conduct Administrator. Such disposition shall be final and there shall be no subsequent proceedings. If the charges are not admitted or cannot be disposed of by mutual consent, the Student Conduct Administrator may later serve in the same matter as the Student Conduct Board or a member thereof. If the student admits violating institutional rules, but sanctions are not agreed to, subsequent process, including a hearing if necessary, shall be limited to determining the appropriate sanction(s). The term "Student Conduct Board" means any person or persons authorized by the Campus Director to determine whether a student has violated the Student Code and to recommend sanctions that may be imposed when a rules violation has been committed. 3. All charges shall be presented to the accused student in written form. A time shall be set for a Student Conduct Board Hearing, not less than five (5) nor more than fifteen (15) calendar days after the student has been notified. Maximum time limits for scheduling of Student Conduct Board Hearings may be extended at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. 4. Student Conduct Board Hearings shall be conducted by a Student Conduct Board according to the following guidelines except as provided below: a. Student Conduct Board Hearings will typically be conducted in private. b. The complainant, the accused student, and their advisors, if any, shall be allowed to attend the entire portion of the Student Conduct Board Hearing when information excluding deliberations will be received. The Student Conduct Administrator will determine who, if anyone, will be admitted to the Student Conduct Board Hearing. c. In Student Conduct Board Hearings involving more than one accused student, the Student Conduct Administrator may permit the Student Conduct Board Hearings concerning each student to be conducted either separately or jointly. d. The Complainant and the accused student have the right to hire an advisor at their own expense. The advisor must be a member of the College community and may not be an attorney. The Complainant and/or the accused student is responsible for presenting his or her own information; advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any Student Conduct Board Hearing. A student should select an advisor whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the Student Conduct Board Hearing. Delays caused by an advisor conflict will not normally be allowed . e. The Complainant, the accused student, and the Student Conduct Board may arrange for witnesses to present pertinent information to the Student Conduct Board. The College will try to arrange the attendance of possible witnesses from the College Community, if reasonably possible, and if they are identified by the Complainant or Accused Student at least two days prior to the Student Conduct Board Hearing. Witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from the Student Conduct Board. Questions may be suggested by the accused student or Complainant. The Student Conduct Board will direct questions to the Chairperson, rather than the witness. This method will preserve the educational tone of the hearing and avoid creation of an adversarial environment. The chairperson of the Student Conduct Board will determine which information will be accepted. f. Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements (including Student Impact Statements) may be accepted as information for consideration by a Student Conduct Board at the discretion of the chairperson. g. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the chairperson of the Student Conduct Board. h. After the portion of the Student Conduct Board Hearing concludes and all pertinent information has been received, the Student Conduct Board shall determine (by majority vote if the Student Conduct Board consists of more than one person) whether the accused student has violated one or more section of the Student Code which the student is charged with violating. i. The Student Conduct Board's determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Student Code. j. Formal rules of process, procedure, and technical rules of evidence, are not used in Student Code proceedings. 5. There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all Student Conduct Board Hearings before a Student Conduct Board (not including deliberations). Deliberations shall not be recorded. The record shall be the property of the College. 6. If an accused student, with notice, does not appear before a Student Conduct Board Hearing, the information in support of the charges shall be presented and considered in the absence of the accused student. 7. The Student Conduct Board may accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well-being, or fears of confrontation of the Complainant, accused student, or other witness during the hearing by providing separate facilities, using a visual screen, or permitting participation by telephone, videophone, closed circuit television, video conferencing, videotape, audio tape, written statement, or other means, as determined in the sole judgment of the Student Conduct Administrator. 18 JANUARY 2010 C. Sanctions Any student found to have committed or attempted to commit is subject to the disciplinary sanctions outlined below. The levels of disciplinary action will vary based on the nature of each situation. These disciplinary actions include, but are not limited to, the following: restitution, warning which could include probationary activities, suspension, and dismissal. Students dismissed for issues relative to conduct will be eligible for readmission only if they are able to present reasonable proof that they have overcome the situation that led to their inappropriate behavior. The decision to readmit will be made by the Dean after a thorough review of the situation. Students may be required to meet with the Dean and/or a designated representative of the Dean to discuss their situation. 1. The following sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to have violated the Student Code: a. Warning - A notice in writing to the student that the student is violating or has violated institutional regulations. b. Probation - A written reprimand for violation of specified regulations. Probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to violate any institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period. c. Loss of Privileges - Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time. d. Fines - Previously established and published fines may be imposed. e. Restitution - Compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement. f. Discretionary Sanctions - Work assignments, essays, service to the College, or other related discretionary assignments. g. Residence Hall Suspension - Separation of the student from the residence halls for a definite period of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified. h. Residence Hall Expulsion - Permanent separation of the student from the residence halls. i. College Suspension - Separation of the student from the College for a definite period of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified. j. College Expulsion - Permanent separation of the student from the College. k. Revocation of Admission and/or Degree - Admission to or a degree awarded from the College may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of College standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation. l. Withholding Degree - The College may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in this Student Conduct Code, including the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any. 2. More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single violation. 3. (a) Other than College expulsion or revocation or withholding of a degree, disciplinary sanctions shall not be made part of the student's permanent academic record. They shall become part of the student's disciplinary record. Upon graduation, the student's disciplinary record may be expunged of disciplinary actions other than residence hall expulsion, College suspension, College expulsion, or revocation or withholding of a degree, upon application to the Student Conduct Administrator. Cases involving the imposition of sanctions other than residence hall expulsion, College suspension, College expulsion or revocation or withholding of a degree shall be expunged from the student's confidential record six years after final disposition of the case. (b) In situations involving both an accused student(s) (or group or organization) and a student(s) claiming to be the victim of another student's conduct, the records of the process and of the sanctions imposed, if any, shall be considered to be the education records of both the accused student(s) and the student(s) claiming to be the victim because the educational career and chances of success in the academic community of each may be impacted. 4. The following sanctions may be imposed upon groups or organizations: a. Those sanctions listed above in Article II(C)(1). b. Loss of selected rights and privileges for a specified period of time. c. Deactivation; loss of all privileges, including College recognition, for a specified period of time. 5. In each case in which a Student Conduct Board determines that a student and/or group or organization has violated the Student Code, the sanction(s) shall be determined and imposed by the Student Conduct Administrator. if the Student Conduct Administrator has been authorized to serve as the Student Conduct Board, the recommendation of the Student Conduct Board shall be considered by the Student Conduct Administrator in determining and imposing sanctions. The Student Conduct Administrator is not limited to sanctions recommended by members of the Student Conduct Board. Following the Student Conduct Board Hearing, the Student Conduct Board and the Student Conduct Administrator shall advise the accused student, group and/or organization (and a complaining student who believes s/he was the victim of another student's conduct) in writing of its determination and of any imposed sanctions. D. Interim Suspension In certain circumstances, the Campus Director, or a designee, may impose a College or residence hall suspension prior to the Student Conduct Board Hearing before a Student Conduct Board. 1. Interim suspension may be imposed only: 1) to ensure the safety and well-being of members of the College community or preservation of College property; b) to ensure the student's own physical or emotional safety and well-being; or c) if the student poses an ongoing threat of disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the College. 2. During the interim suspension, a student shall be denied access to the residence halls and/or campus (including classes) and/or all other College activities or privileges the Campus Director or the Student Conduct Administrator determine to be appropriate. 3. The interim suspension does not replace the regular process, which shall proceed on the normal schedule, up to and through a Student Conduct Board Hearing, if required. The student should be notified in writing of this action and the reasons for the suspension. The notice should include the time, date, and place of a subsequent hearing at which the student may show cause why his or her continued presence on the campus does not constitute a threat [and at which the student may contest whether a campus rule was violated]. E. Appeals 1. A decision reached by the Student Conduct Board or a sanction imposed by the Student Conduct Administrator may be appealed by the Accused Student(s) or Complainant(s) to an Appellate Board within five (5) days of the decision. Such appeals shall be in writing and shall be delivered to the Student Conduct Administrator or his or her designee. 2. Except as required to explain the basis of new information, an appeal shall be limited to a review of the verbatim record of the Student Conduct Board Hearing and supporting documents for one or more of the following purposes: a. To determine whether the Student Conduct Board Hearing was conducted fairly in light of the charges and information presented, and in conformity with prescribed procedures giving the complaining party a reasonable opportunity to prepare and to present information that the Student Code was violated, and giving the Accused Student a reasonable opportunity to prepare and to present a response to those allegations. Deviations from designated procedures will not be a basis for sustaining an appeal unless significant prejudice results. b. To determine whether the decision reached regarding the 19 JANUARY 2010 Accused Student was based on substantial information, that is, whether there were facts in the case that, if believed by the fact finder, were sufficient to establish that a violation of the Student Code occurred. c. To determine whether the sanction(s) imposed were appropriate for the violation of the Student Code which the student was found to have committed. d. To consider new information, sufficient to alter a decision, or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing, because such information and/or facts were not known to the person appealing at the time of the original Student Conduct Board Hearing. 3. If an appeal is upheld by the Appellate Board, the matter shall be returned to the original Student Conduct Board and Student Conduct Administrator for re-opening of Student Conduct Board Hearing to allow reconsideration of the original determination and/or sanction(s). If an appeal is not upheld, the matter shall be considered final and binding upon all involved. F. The College will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of any crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the College against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense with respect to such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the victim's next of kin may make a written request for this information. ACADEMIC HONORS Dean's List At the end of each semester, Bryant & Stratton College recognizes the academic achievement of students who have earned grade point averages of 3.30 to 4.0. To be eligible for Dean's List status, students must have successfully completed at least 12 semester credit hours in the semester just ended and have earned grades of C or better. Grades of F, I, NP, or academic dismissal or probation status makes a student ineligible for the Dean's List for the semester in which those grades were earned. Graduation Honors At commencement exercises, eligible degree candidates receive recognition for academic excellence as follows: Summa Cum Laude (Highest Distinction) - Cumulative grade point average from 3.77 to 4.0 Magna Cum Laude (High Distinction) - Cumulative grade point average from 3.54 to 3.76 Cum Laude (Distinction) - Cumulative grade point average from 3.30 to 3.53 Honor Awards and Honor Societies There are a number of honor awards that are attainable and honor societies that are active on designated Bryant & Stratton College campuses. Students are encouraged to seek specific information and academic requirements from the Academic Dean at the campus. 20 JANUARY 2010 Tuition and Fees Tuition and Fees All tuition is due and payable in full at registration. Arrangements may be made for full-time students (and/or parents of full-time students) to sign a promissory note to pay the portion of tuition not met by scholarship, financial aid, or other sources. The terms of this promissory note include monthly payments as stated on the signed promissory note. No interest or fees are charged if payments are made as agreed. All arrangements for financial aid should be made prior to the start of the semester. The base tuition rate is $7,335 per semester for all programs. The per credit hour rate is $489 for all programs. Additional fees vary by program and are explained below. Should economic conditions require a tuition adjustment, students will be advised before the start of each semester. All tuition and fees are quoted in US dollars. Books and Supplies Books and supplies are available for purchase at the Online Bookstore or at select campus stores. Student costs will vary each semester depending upon subjects scheduled and publishers'/ suppliers' prices in effect at the date of purchase. Costs are estimated at $400 to $950 per semester and are posted each semester for those students ordering through the Online Bookstore. Textbooks and supplies are purchased by the student and become the property of the student. The college store is offered as a service to students. Students are not required to purchase their books or supplies from the College. For more information about the Online Bookstore go to http://www.bryantstratton.edu on the Internet or ask your campus advisor. To comply with federal safety regulations, Medical Assisting students are required to wear protective covering in the medical laboratory. Medical Assisting students may be required to purchase a lab coat. Nursing students are required to purchase at minimum, approved clinical attire (scrubs and shoes), stethoscope, and wrist watch with second-hand. The required items are described in the Nursing Program Student Handbook. The estimated cost of these items is $150 - $250. Electronic Technology students purchase tool kits at approximately $200 - $300. Graphic Design students purchase material kits for of approximately $200 -$250. Additional materials may be required for an approximate cost of $100 per semester. Students who elect to take INFT 130 and are not enrolled in the Information Technology degree (program 376) will be charged an additional $600 - $700 for the hardware costs associated with this course. Students, regardless of program, who retake INFT 130 after receiving a grade of "F" will pay an additional charge of $600 - $700 for hardware costs for the subsequent attempt(s). Students enrolled in INFT 130 who have not satisfied full payment for the course and associated charges will forfeit the rights to the hardware. The cost of these supplies is nonrefundable. Networking Technology and Security Technology Students Students who enroll in either the Networking Technology or Security Technology associate-degree programs are required to have contemporary computer equipment. The minimum system requirements, which include a laptop computer and internet access requirements, are listed in the Technology Requirements section of this catalog. For instances where a student does not have ready access to a laptop computer or their current laptop computer does not meet the required minimum specifications, a laptop computer is available for purchase at the Online Bookstore. The estimated cost of the laptop computer is $1,000. In addition to the laptop fee, students enrolled in these programs will have additional lab access fees for selected courses. Day Classes Any student classified as a day student who takes between 12 and 18 credit hours per semester will be assessed the base day tuition rate per semester. Any student classified as a day student taking fewer than 12 credits or more than 18 credits will be assessed tuition at the per credit hour rate. Evening & Online Classes Any student classified as an evening or online student who takes between 13 and 18 credit hours per semester will be assessed the base tuition per semester rate. Any student classified as an evening or online student taking fewer than 13 credits or more than 18 credits will be assessed tuition at the per credit hour rate. Nursing Program Tuition and Fees Nursing students taking courses totaling 12-18 credits per semester, for day or evening classes, will be assessed the base tuition per semester rate. A new student taking fewer than 12 credits or more than 18 credits will be assessed tuition at the per credit hour rate. Students registered for NURS101, NURS201, NURS211, NURS221, or NURS222 will be charged an additional clinical lab fee of $400 for each of these courses. Registration Fee A $35 registration fee will be charged. This fee will not be charged in subsequent semesters unless there is a break in enrollment or it may be charged in event of change in program. Transportation Costs Transportation costs are estimated at $440 per semester. Room and Board (Syracuse Campus) Room and board are estimated at $3,800 per semester. Graduation Fee Students who successfully complete any degree or diploma program will be assessed a $100 administrative graduation fee. This fee incorporates the cost of caps and gowns for graduation. A locker fee is charged per semester for students electing to rent a locker. Official Transcript Fee Official transcripts are issued only on written request and are mailed directly to the receiver from the College. There is a $5 fee for each official transcript requested. Official transcripts are issued when all financial obligations to the College have been fulfilled and any delinquent loans have been cleared. 21 JANUARY 2010 Locker Fee Proficiency Examination A $100 non-refundable administrative fee is charged for each optional proficiency examination attempted. All tuition paid by new students who cancel their application or registration for any reason prior to the start of classes will be refunded in full. The refund will not apply to the cost of purchases made at the Online Bookstore. Students who officially withdraw from all classes during the refund period will receive a refund per the following chart. Refunds for Wisconsin and Virginia students are found in the respective state sections of this catalog. Refunds for New York and Ohio will be computed according to the following guidelines: Date of Official Communication Refund Percentage Company-Sponsored Tuition Reimbursement Many companies provide tuition reimbursement as part of their employee benefits package. If you are employed full-time, you should contact the personnel office of your employer for information concerning your company's tuition reimbursement program. Such programs commonly require that the employee initially pay the tuition for a subject or program and that the tuition will be reimbursed by the company upon successful completion by the student. If you are attending College through a company-sponsored tuition reimbursement program, you must notify your Financial Aid office of this additional aid and make arrangements to provide your employer with the information required for its tuition reimbursement program. Your Financial Aid office may require proof of this reimbursement from your employer. Prior to start of classes through the first week of classes During the second week of classes During the third week of classes During the fourth week of classes After the fourth week of classes 100% 75% 50% 25% 0% Cancellation and Refund Policy Bryant & Stratton College believes a fair adjustment policy recognizes that situations occur where the student has no control and the College has incurred a continuing cost in faculty, space, and equipment for each student enrolled. Students intending to withdraw from any number of classes are encouraged, but not required to give written notice of their withdrawal to the Academic Office to ensure the withdrawals are officially recorded and the students' records are updated. Official withdrawal will be accepted only once the necessary paperwork is completed and approved by the Academic Office. Unless a student drops a course or courses during the drop/add period, no refund of tuition will be granted to a full- or part-time student who does not officially withdraw from the College. This also applies to students taking online classes in the second session of the 15 week semester. Non-attendance in a course does not constitute an official withdrawal. Refunds for official withdrawals will be based on the Refund Policy listed in this catalog. In circumstances necessitating a student's actual change from full- to parttime status, authorization may be granted only with the approval of the Academic Office. Students should be aware, both official withdrawals as well as non-official withdrawals have an impact on financial aid. Students who register as full-time students who do not officially withdraw from a course(s) will continue to be charged full-time tuition. Unless students drop a course or courses during the drop/add period, students who register as part-time students who do not officially withdraw from a course or courses will continue to be charged the tuition based upon the number of courses they registered for including students taking online classes in the second session of the 15 week semester. However, their lack of attendance in a course during the drop/add period may cause their enrollment status to change to parttime for financial aid purposes, leaving a tuition balance not covered through financial aid. Tuition is based on the assumption that a student will remain in college for the full semester. All refunds will be computed based upon the date the student notified the Academic, Business Office, or Financial Aid personnel of his or her intention to withdraw or the last date of attendance, whichever is later. This refund policy will apply to all tuition, fees, dormitory rents, and other charges incurred by the student, with the exception of purchases made at the Online Bookstore. The refund policy applies to all matriculating part-time and full-time students including those part-time matriculating students who take a single credit-bearing course and Online students. Withdrawal from a course or courses but not from a program will not result in a refund unless the withdrawal from the course or courses takes place during the drop/add period. The references to weeks on the above charts refer to a calendar week that runs from Wednesday to Tuesday. The refund policies apply to all students enrolled in credit-bearing single subjects as well as in a program, regardless of their form of payment. Refunds are not offered for special non-credit courses that are not part of a degree or diploma program. No amount of tuition will be retained for any terms beyond the current semester. Refunds will be made within forty five (45) calendar days of the student's official date of withdrawal unless federal or state guidelines require refunds be made in a shorter period of time. Treatment of Federal Student Aid When a Student Withdraws The law specifies how schools must determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that you earn if you withdraw from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS Loans, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs). When you withdraw during your payment period or period of enrollment (Bryant & Stratton College can define these for you and tell you which one applies) the amount of Title IV program assistance that you have earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula. If you received (or your College or parent received on your behalf) less assistance than the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned by Bryant & Stratton College and/or you. The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a prorated basis. For example, if you completed 30% of your payment period or period of enrollment, you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have completed more than 60% of the payment period or period of enrollment, you earn all the assistance that you were scheduled to receive for that period. If you did not receive all of the funds that you earned, you may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement. If the postwithdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, your permission must be given before Bryant & Stratton College can disburse them. You may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds so that you don't incur additional debt. Bryant & Stratton College uses all or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursement (including loan funds, if you accept them) for tuition, fees, and room and board charges (as contracted with the College). For all other College charges, Bryant & Stratton College needs your permission to use the post-withdrawal disbursement. If you do not give your permission (which some schools ask for when you enroll), you will be offered the funds. However, it may be in your best interest to allow the College to keep the funds to reduce your debt at Bryant & Stratton College. 22 JANUARY 2010 There are some Title IV funds that you were scheduled to receive that cannot be disbursed to you once you withdraw because of other eligibility requirements. For example, if you are a first-time, first-year undergraduate student and you have not completed the first 30 days of your program before you withdraw, you will not receive any FFEL loan funds that you would have received had you remained enrolled past the 30th day. If you receive (or Bryant & Stratton College or parent receive on your behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, your school must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of: 1. your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds, or 2. the entire amount of excess funds. Bryant & Stratton College must return this amount even if it didn't keep this amount of your Title IV program funds. If Bryant & Stratton College is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent for a PLUS Loan) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, you make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the grant funds you received or were scheduled to receive. You must make arrangements with Bryant & Stratton College or the Department of Education to return the unearned grant funds. The requirements for Title IV program funds when you withdraw are separate from any refund policy that your school may have. Therefore, you may still owe funds to the school to cover unpaid institutional charges. Bryant & Stratton College may also charge you for any Title IV program funds that Bryant & Stratton College was required to return. If you don't already know what Bryant & Stratton's College refund policy is, you can ask Bryant & Stratton College for a copy. Bryant & Stratton College can also provide you with the requirements and procedures for officially withdrawing from school as set forth in this catalog. If you have questions about your Title IV program funds, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1 -800-4-FEDAID (1-800-4333243). TTY users may call 1-800-730-8913. Information is also available on Student Aid on the Web at www.studentaid.ed.gov. If a withdrawing student has received financial aid funds, Bryant & Stratton College will return such unearned funds to the federal program as required under federal regulation in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan 2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan 3. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loan (other than PLUS loans) 4. Subsidized Direct Stafford Loan 5. Perkins Loans 6. Federal PLUS Loans 7. Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds is required 8. Academic Competitiveness Grants 9. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) 10. Other assistance under this Title (for example LEAP) 11. The student Federal regulations require that financial aid recipients use refunds to repay financial aid received for that semester's attendance. This policy applies to institutional aid as well. Repayments Students who completely withdraw from classes after having received an overage disbursement (check) caused by excess financial aid may be required to return all or part of that disbursement check to the College. Failure to return the funds (if required) will result in a loss of eligibility for further Title IV student aid. Further Details on Refund/Repayment Additional details on refunds and repayments can be found in The Student Guide, published annually by the U.S. Department of Education, which is available from the Financial Aid Office at each campus. Certification and Disbursement of Stafford Loans Disbursement of Stafford loan funds for first semester students' who are also first time borrowers of Stafford loan funds, may not be disbursed earlier that thirty (30) days from the beginning of the semester. Continuing students' funds may not be disbursed earlier than ten (10) days prior to the beginning of the semester. Past Due Accounts Past due student accounts will be referred to a collection agency at the discretion of the College. 23 JANUARY 2010 Financing Your Education A student's decision to attend Bryant & Stratton College should be based on interest in our programs and not on the ability to meet all college costs. Bryant & Stratton College believes students should not be denied the opportunity to pursue their career interests because of a lack of financial resources. Bryant & Stratton College participates in several types of financial assistance programs gift aid (scholarships and grants), low-interest loans, and employment opportunities. In many cases, our Financial Aid Office awards qualified students a financial aid "package" which includes all three types of financial aid. Assistance with financial planning is available for families on an individual basis to help them determine how they can best utilize their own resources and other funds to meet college costs. The Financial Aid Office will gladly discuss the various types of financial assistance available and will provide students with assistance in completing financial forms during their visit to Bryant & Stratton College. Student Eligibility Requirements Financial aid is distributed to students based on their computed financial need as determined by the financial aid application(s) filed. "Financial need" is the difference between the cost of the student's education (tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board, travel, and personal expenses) and the total contribution expected from his/her family. The family's contribution is based on an analysis of the financial aid application. Among the items considered are family income, assets, liabilities, the number of people in the household, the number of family members in college, and the student's own resources, such as savings. Campus-based financial aid programs, including the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) and the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program, may be administered through Bryant & Stratton College. Students may apply for these programs directly at the Financial Aid Office. Students may be eligible for a combination of these programs, and a Pell Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and/or a state grant, or for just a single program. Aid from these programs is awarded on the basis of need; however, each program has different requirements. Consult with the Financial Aid Office for further information on these programs. The general eligibility requirements for the federal assistance programs are: Enrollment or acceptance for enrollment into a program; U.S. citizenship, nationalization or permanent residency Maintaining satisfactory academic progress; Not being in default on any federally insured student loans (i.e., Perkins Loan (NDSL), Stafford Loan (GSL), Supplemental Loan (SLS), etc.) at any college; Not owe a repayment on federal or state grants at any institution; Sign a Statement of Educational Purpose; If required, register with the Selective Service; Provide evidence of financial need. How to Apply Students are encouraged to meet with a financial aid advisor in order to determine financial aid qualifications. A member of the financial aid staff will help students to complete the following application forms: 1. Financial Aid Forms - The "Free Application for Federal Student Aid" (FAFSA) is available from the Financial Aid Office or apply online at www.FAFSA.ed.gov. The form must be completed and forwarded to the Department of Education, where it is then processed. In some cases, the College may process the student's application electronically in order to reduce processing time. New York students receive an Express TAP Application (ETA) from NYSHESC. Eligibility for financial assistance is determined by federal and state agencies, which will produce and send an output document directly to the student. 2. Federal Income Tax Returns - Students may be required to provide the Financial Aid Office a signed copy of their own and/or their spouse's and/or their parent's federal and state income tax returns, including schedules, as well as any additional income and asset information requested by the school. Upon evaluation of the above forms, the Financial Aid Office will notify students of their eligibility for financial aid or of any other steps they may take to receive further consideration for assistance. Students are required to apply on an annual basis for financial aid consideration. Students may obtain the forms described above annually beginning on approximately January 1 at the Financial Aid Office for application for the next financial aid year which begins on July 1. Transfer Students Students who attended any other postsecondary institution must request a financial aid transcript from each school or college attended. Financial assistance awards will not be disbursed until all financial aid transcript(s) have been received. Distribution of Financial Aid All student aid grants (Federal Pell, ACG, FSEOG and TAP) are credited to the student's account each semester the student enrolls as a matriculating student in an eligible program. All FFELP lopans are deposited to the student's account when the check is negotiable or within three (3) days of the College's receipt of an electronic fund transfer (EFT) disbursement. FFELP loans are normally disbursed in two payments. Federal Work-Study payroll is disbursed in accordance with the employer's routine payroll cycle. Rights and Responsibilities of Students Receiving Financial Aid JANUARY 2010 Financial Aid Programs The following federally-funded programs are the major financial aid resources available to students. Students may receive assistance from any one of these programs or from a combination of these programs. Eligibility for these programs is based on the completion of the Federal Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students are eligible to receive financial aid as long as they remain in good academic standing and continue to meet all eligibility standards. If students fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress, the Dean will notify them (see Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress section). Financial aid will not be disbursed to students who fail to meet the academic progress standards. Students on probation are deemed to be in good academic standing. Federal Programs PELL GRANT - The Pell Grant Program provides grants of up to $5,550 for each undergraduate year. Eligibility for these grants is determined by the federal government, based on the information provided on the "Free Application for Federal Student Aid." Approximately six weeks after submitting an application, the student should receive and bring their Student Aid Report to the Financial Aid Office of the College to determine the amount of the student's award. 24 FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT (FSEOG) The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants Program provides financial assistance to students who demonstrate financial need. Grants range from $100 to $4,000 per academic year. Eligibility for these grants is determined by the Financial Aid Office of the College. ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS GRANT (ACG) The Federal Stafford Loan Program includes two distinct loan programs. Eligibility for the "Subsidized" Stafford Loan is based upon financial need. The "Unsubsidized" Stafford Loan is not based on financial need. Almost all students who meet the "general eligibility requirements for federal financial aid" are eligible for a Stafford Loan. The eligibility for unsubsidized loans is larger for independent students because they do not have access to PLUS loans. Stafford Loan eligibility (disbursed after 7/1/08): subject to change. Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) An Academic Competitiveness Grant will provide up to $750 for the first year of undergraduate study and up to $1,300 for the second year of undergraduate study. 1. Eligible for a Federal Pell Grant 2. Enrolled at least half-time during their enrollment (beginning with 0910 aid year) 3. Have successfully completed a rigorous high school program, as determined by the state or local education agency and recognized by the Secretary of Education. 4. Second year students must also have maintained a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0. The program was available for the first time for the 2006-07 school year for first year students who graduated from high school after January 1, 2006 and for second year students who graduated from high school after January 1, 2005. Eligibility for this grant is based on information provided on the FAFSA (the U.S. Department of Education contacted potentially eligible students after July 1, 2008). Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) The Federal PLUS Program enables parents to borrow directly from many lending institutions to pay for a dependent child's cost of education. Repayment begins on the date of the last disbursement of the loan, and payment is made over a ten or twenty year period. Payments may be deferred upon request. The interest is a variable rate as determined annually by the federal government. Other Financial Sources Governmental Agencies This is a federal program of student employment for students with financial need. Students may work part-time at the college while attending classes full-time. On-campus jobs include work in offices, library, computer labs, etc. Off-campus employment with qualifying agencies may also be available. Federal Stafford Loan Various governmental agencies administer programs that assist with educational costs. These agencies may include the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), New York Vocational Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID), Trade Readjustment Act (TRA), Workforce Investment Act (WIA), and others. For further information regarding eligibility, contact your high school guidance counselor, other social services agencies, or Bryant & Stratton College. Stafford Student Loans, formerly known as Guaranteed Student Loan, enable students to borrow money for educational expenses directly from a bank, credit union, savings and loan association, or other participating lenders. Annual Loan Limits for Undergraduate and Graduate/Professional Students Effective for loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008 Dependent Students (excluding students whose parents cannot borrow PLUS) Base Amount Sub/Unsub Additional Unsubsidized Loan Amount Loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008 First-year undergraduate Second-year undergraduate Third-year and beyond undergraduate Independent Students (and depending students whose parents cannot borrow PLUS) $3,500 $4,500 $5,500 Base Amount Sub/Unsub $2,000 $2,000 $2,000 Additional Unsubsidized Loan Amount Loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008 First-year undergraduate Second-year undergraduate Third-year and beyond undergraduate $3,500 $4,500 $5,500 $6,000 $6,000 $7,000 25 JANUARY 2010 General Scholarships Bryant & Stratton College Scholarship Programs Bryant & Stratton College offers scholarship programs to students in good academic standing. Matching Scholarships Bryant & Stratton College will match the dollar value of any scholarship awarded to any student from a professional organization with a valid academic scholarship program. The organization can not be affiliated with Bryant & Stratton College. Organizations, typically 501 (c) (3)s, may include but are not limited to unions, civic or fraternal groups, philanthropic societies, educational entities, and local or national professional groups and business firms. Scholarships from private or public businesses must be reviewed and pre-approved by the College. The focus of the review will include history of the program, past award amounts, award criteria, breadth of eligible award recipients and potential annual total award amounts. Scholarships provided to employees of public or private businesses must include eligibility criteria in addition to employment to be eligible for a matching scholarship. Internal College-specific scholarships are excluded from the matching program. The dollar value will be applied towards tuition up to the full value of the scholarship that qualifies the student for this program, and in no instance will the amount exceed the total tuition for the program in which the student originally enrolled. The value of the scholarship will not exceed the cost of tuition after the amount of state grant awards has been applied. Bryant & Stratton College Matching Scholarships are funded on a consecutive semester basis without interruption over the award period identified by the granting agency. Documented proof of the organization's academic scholarship program must accompany the Bryant & Stratton College Matching Scholarship application and must include written and specific eligibility criteria and/or conditions for awarding scholarship funds. Documentation should be submitted no later than two weeks prior to the start of classes. Academic Excellence Scholarships Tuition scholarships are awarded at most Bryant & Stratton College campuses on a competitive basis. These scholarships are available to recent high school seniors, adult learners, online learners, and Bachelor Degree Program students. Refer to the scholarship chart for the specific criteria. The examinations are held throughout the academic year at Bryant & Stratton College and other locations. For more information regarding dates and criteria for a variety of academic excellence scholarships that are available to you, please call your local admissions department. Awards are based upon academic promise and the quality of materials submitted to the Scholarship Committee. Scholarships may be awarded contingent upon the application submittal and acceptance deadline set forth in the scholarship to a Bryant & Stratton College degree program. An award can be used at any campus location during the awarded school year(s) and is not transferable for use by any other person. Scholarships may be renewable for each semester that the recipient continuously attends, maintains satisfactory academic progress, a GPA of 3.0, and adheres to the College's regulations and policies as outlined in the Official Catalog. Scholarship awards cover all or part of the cost of full-time tuition (12-18 credit hours per semester). With the exception of the Online Career Stimulus Scholarship, all other costs such as college fees, books, supplies and proficiencies are paid in full by the student. Bryant & Stratton College requires scholarship recipients to apply for state grants. Any funds awarded under such grant programs be applied first toward the student's tuition. The Bryant & Stratton College Scholarship will then be applied to any remaining tuition balance. The value of any scholarship will not exceed the cost of tuition after the amount of state grant awards has been applied. Scholarships are funded proportionally on a consecutive semester basis without interruption over the scholarship award period. Should circumstances warrant other consideration, only the Campus Director may grant approval. Early Acceptance Scholarship Program The Bryant & Stratton College campuses can award one-time scholarships of $500 each to students who complete the entire enrollment process by a deadline predetermined and specified by the local scholarship committees at each campus. To be eligible for the award a student must: Meet with an admissions representative for a personal interview to determine program selection; Complete an application for enrollment in the spring or fall semester; Submit an essay that addresses these questions: - "Why are you interested in Bryant & Stratton College?" - "Why are you the best candidate for the scholarship?" - "How do you plan on using your Bryant & Stratton College education?" The selection of winners will be based on the highest evaluation scores and the strength of the application as determined by the Admissions Committee. 26 JANUARY 2010 Bryant & Stratton College Scholarships Scholarships Academic Excellence Prospective Student High School Senior Associate Degree Amount Not to exceed $2,000 per term Maximum award per student $8,000 Criteria General attitude Examination score and/or written essay and/or appropriate academic project High school graduation date within the calendar year Must be full-time student May be defined locally for specific program or organization Examination and/or written essay High school graduation date prior to the current year May be full-time or part-time student May be defined locally for specific program or organization Written essay May be full or part-time student May be defined locally for specific or organization use Written essay High School graduation date prior to the current year May be full or part-time student May be defined locally for specific or organization use High School Senior Bachelor Degree Adult Learner Associate Degree Adult Learner Bachelor Degree Continuing/Articulating Student Bachelor Degree Not to exceed $2,000 per term Maximum award per student $16,000 Awards vary between $500-$2,000 per term Maximum award per student $8,000 Not to exceed $2,000 per term Maximum award per student $16,000 Not to exceed $1,000 per term Maximum award per student $4,000 Online Adult Learner Associate Degree Student Awards vary between $400 - $800 per term Maximum award per student $4,000 Online Adult Learner Bachelor Degree Student Online Career Stimulus Scholarship 2009 Associate Degree Online Career Stimulus Scholarship Bachelor Degree Online Continuing/Articulating Students Bachelor Degree Matching Scholarships All Students Awards vary between $400 - $800 per term Maximum award per student $8,000 Maximum 10 Awards Award amounts vary based on financial need Maximum 5 Awards Award amounts vary based on financial need Awards vary between $400 - $800 per term Maximum award per student $4,000 Equal amount Combined amount not to exceed the cost of tuition after any state aid is applied Maximum award per student $500 Qualified professional organization Bryant & Stratton College Scholarships will not be matched Written essay and/or alternate academic criteria Must be full-time student or part-time students Check with the local campus for application deadlines Early Acceptance Scholarship All Students Scholarships: 27 JANUARY 2010 All scholarship recipients are required to apply for state grants. Grant awards received by scholarship recipients will be applied to the cost of tuition before scholarship awards. Scholarships are awarded to the recipient in their 4th week of classes. With the exception of the Online Career Stimulus Scholarship, the combination of grant and scholarship awards may not exceed the cost of tuition. All scholarships are fully funded by the College. All scholarships are academically based. The student must maintain a GPA of 3.0 to receive the scholarship. The student must maintain continuous enrollment through graduation unless otherwise approved by a Campus Director. With the exception of the Online Career Stimulus Scholarship, any student who has received a scholarship at the Associate Degree level may carry his or her scholarship into the Bachelor's program up to the defined maximum value if he or she maintains continuous enrollment and meets the required academic standards. Specific campus policies and procedures regarding scholarships are available in the Financial Services Department at each campus. Specific campus policies and procedures regarding scholarships for the Bachelor Degree programs are available at each campus. To access the number of awards offered by campus locations, refer to the College's website at www.bryantstratton.edu or check with the local campus Financial Services Department 28 JANUARY 2010 Bryant & Stratton College Information by State Bachelor Degree & Associate Degree Programs Allied Health Medical Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AOS (1) Medical Administrative Assistant Online Associate Degree AOS (1) Medical Assisting Associate Degree AOS (1) Applied Design Graphic Design Associate Degree AOS (1) Interactive Media Design Associate Degree AOS (1) Business Accounting Associate Degree AOS (1) Accounting Online Associate Degree AOS (1) Business Associate Degree AOS (1) Business Online Associate Degree AOS (1) General Management Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (3) General Management Online Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (3) Human Resources Specialist Associate Degree AOS (1) Human Resources Specialist Online Associate Degree AOS (1) Information Technology Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AOS (1) Administrative Assistant Online Associate Degree AAS (2) Networking Technology Associate Degree AAS (2) Networking Technology Online Associate Degree AAS (2) Security Technology Associate Degree AAS (2) Security Technology Online Associate Degree AAS (2) Legal Criminal Justice Associate Degree AOS (1) Paralegal Studies Associate Degree AOS (1) Paralegal Studies Online Associate Degree AOS (1) Hospitality and Travel Restaurant & Hotel Management Associate Degree AOS (1) Travel & Tourism Management Associate Degree AOS (1) B&SC Code 312 316 375 340 347 301 302 333 332 570 577 334 339 305 306 383 390 396 392 384 380 381 391 385 CIP Code 51.0716 51.0716 51.0801 50.0402 50.0401 52.0301 52.0301 52.0299 52.0299 52.0201 52.0201 52.1001 52.1001 52.0401 52.0401 11.1002 11.1002 11.1003 11.1003 43.0103 22.0302 22.0302 52.0902 52.0903 Hegis Code 5005 5005 5214 5012 5012 5002 5002 5001 5001 5001 5001 5099 5099 5005 5005 5199 5199 5199 5199 5505 5099 5099 5010 5011 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Note: All programs may not be offered at every campus every semester. (1) Associate in Occupational Studies (2) Associate of Applied Science (3) Bachelor of Business Administration See the "Programs of Study" section for a description of programs and degree plans. PROGRAMS OF STUDY New York In New York State, Bryant & Stratton College campuses are authorized by the New York State Board of Regents to confer the Associate of Occupational Studies and Associate of Applied Science degrees and related diploma programs. The Amherst, Buffalo and Southtowns campuses are approved by the NY State Board of Regents to confer the Bachelor of Business Administration degree. Documents describing the particular Campus' accreditation are available for review in the office of the Campus Director. The Medical Assisting programs offered at Albany, Buffalo, Greece, Henrietta, Southtowns, Syracuse and Syracuse North campuses are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org), on recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review (MAERB). New York State students of Bryant & Stratton College may be enrolled in an Associate of Occupational Studies degree program that was previously approved by the State of New York. Programs listed in the catalog are programs that are currently being offered. 30 JANUARY 2010 Syracuse North X X X X X X X X X X PROGRAMS OF STUDY -- NEW YORK Amherst Albany Campus Locations Southtowns Syracuse Henrietta Greece Buffalo FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS -- New York State In order to meet the general eligibility requirements for the state financial assistance program in New York, a student must: Be a New York State resident (for one year) and a U.S. citizen or permanent resident alien Be enrolled full time and matriculated in a program of study at Bryant & Stratton College Not be in default on any federally insured student loans Maintain satisfactory academic progress according to New York State standards. Meet the requirements of accelerated TAP as outlined on this page If students transfer from other postsecondary institutions or if they change their major program at Bryant & Stratton College, they will be positioned in the Standards of Academic Progress Chart to their best advantage as indicated by the number of credit hours approved for transfer into the program. Specific criteria which explains in detail the level of performance required for good academic standing as approved by the New York State Education Department are available to all students in the Academic Office at each campus. Satisfactory TAP Academic Progress Program Pursuit and Pursuit Level Students who have lost TAP eligibility may have this standing restored in one of the following ways: Make up past academic deficiencies by completing one semester of study without any state aid or scholarships Be readmitted to College after an absence of at least one calendar year Transfer to another institution Use a one-time TAP waiver Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) TAP is a New York State grant program which is available to New York State residents for full-time study at approved institutions. TAP grants are based on your family's New York State net taxable income for the prior year. Your TAP award, depending upon your status, can range from $500 to $5,000 per academic year. New York State TAP Program Requirements The New York State TAP program has additional requirements for satisfactory academic progress standards that must be met for continued eligibility: Successful Program Pursuit requires completion of a percentage of the minimum full-time course load according to the following schedule: Year of Eligibility Percent Completed TAP Waiver Regulations of the New York State Commissioner of Education permits students to receive a one-time wavier of TAP academic progress and pursuit level requirements as an undergraduate. Waivers to these requirements may be granted upon specific application and must be completed in accordance with the institution's criteria. The institution may grant a wavier only in extreme situations where extenuating circumstances warrant its use. The chief academic official in conjunction with the financial aid official approves or declines waiver requests. 1st (0-12 points) 2nd (13-24 points) 3rd (25-36 points) 4th (37-48 points) 50% (6 credit hours) 75% (9 credit hours) 100% (12 credit hours) 100% (12 credit hours) Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) The Aid for Part-Time Study Program is a New York State grant program which provides up to $2,000 per year not to exceed actual tuition cost to help part-time students meet their educational expenses. Standard of Satisfactory Academic Progress for Purpose of Determining Eligibility for New York State Financial Aid Calendar: Semester* Programs: Applies to TAP recipients in all Associate Degrees Before Being Certified for This Payment A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits With at Least This Grade Point Average 1st 0 2nd 3 3rd 9 4th 18 5th 30 6th 45 Accelerated TAP Effective January 2007, any student enrolled in his or her third consecutive semester must have earned 24 credit hours, or their equivalent, during the preceding two semesters to be eligible for TAP during that semester. GI Bill Educational Benefits .0 .5 .75 1.3 2.0 2.0 Bryant & Stratton College programs are approved for the training of eligible veterans, eligible selected reservists, and eligible dependents by the New York State Bureau of Veterans Education. New York State Veteran's Tuition Awards are awarded to eligible fulltime and part-time veterans matriculated in an undergraduate degree program. 2010-2011 awards are set at 98% of tuition or $4,287; whichever is less and prorated based on enrollment level. Eligibility requirements apply and can be found at www.hesc.com or the military corner tab. Calendar: Semester* Programs: Baccalaureate Degrees Applies to TAP recipients who receive their first award after 7/1/06. Before Being Certified for This Payment A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits With at Least This Grade Point Average 1st 0 2nd 3 3rd 9 4th 21 5th 33 6th 45 7th 60 8th 75 0 1.1 1.2 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 *For TAP purposes, a semester is defined as a semester in which the student utilizes TAP. 31 JANUARY 2010 SCHOLARSHIPS -- New York State The campuses offer scholarships to recent high school graduates, adult learners, online learners and students in the Bachelor Degree program. Please refer to the general scholarship section for complete details and criteria. Student Complaints Bryant & Stratton College prides itself in providing a positive experience for all students. In the event you become dissatisfied with any aspect of your educational experience, you have the right to post a formal complaint. To register a formal complaint you should adhere to the following procedure. 1. Prepare a written complaint describing the nature of the problem, the date of occurrence, and your student identification number. You can mail, e-mail or submit a paper copy of your complaint. Send this formal complaint to the manager of the appropriate department. If your concern does not relate to a specific department, address your complaint to the Dean. 2. You will receive a return message within 5 business days, confirming that your complaint has been received. 3. Within 10 business days of receipt of the complaint, you will receive an official response from the manager or campus designate. The response may include a scheduled meeting, resolution action, or referral to a committee. 4. All formal complaints are retained as part of the student files. 5. If you are dissatisfied with the response from the campus department manager, you may submit your concern to the Campus Director. Residence Life Award (Syracuse Campus Only) A maximum of 40 Residence Life Awards are made available each year by competition to recent high school seniors who plan to live in the campus dormitories while attending the Syracuse campus. 1. Applicants must meet the minimum entrance requirements outlined in the Bryant & Stratton College catalog 2. Complete a Residence Life Award application 3. Submit a completed financial aid form The Residence Life Award can be used for room charges only and is worth up to $500 per semester. The award is funded for each semester of enrollment up to six semesters of full-time, consecutive enrollment. The students receiving grants must maintain full-time status and a 2.0 cumulative average in a Bryant & Stratton College Associate Degree Program. Career Services - Placement Support Career Services provides career development planning and placement support to enrolled students and college alumni. The employer community also benefits from Career Services with complimentary recruitment and talent matching services. The placement success of each graduate is closely monitored through Career Services. For the student cohorts of the 2007-2008 academic year, there were a total of 718 available graduates from the nine New York State Bryant & Stratton College campuses (including the Online division). Of these graduates, 656 or 91% were placed in their chosen career field. Although there is no guarantee of placement upon graduation, the College enjoys a solid reputation for its timely and high-rate placement performance. Athletic Grants (Syracuse/Syracuse North Campuses) Athletic grants may be awarded to full-time students for a maximum of four semesters in which they participate on a team while attending the Syracuse or Syracuse North campus. Student athletes must continue to be enrolled in a minimum of 12 credits to remain eligible. Please contact the Athletic Director's office for requirements and regulations concerning athletic grants. Immunization Upon acceptance, all students attending schools in New York State (full-time and part-time) born on or after January 1, 1957, are required to submit proof of immunization against measles, mumps, and rubella. Persons born prior to January 1, 1957, are exempt from this requirement. Proof of immunity is a condition for registration and class attendance. Students who fail to produce adequate documentation within 30 days of the start of their first semester of enrollment will be dismissed from College. An admissions representative can provide full information on this requirement. Effective August 15, 2003 the Public Health Law requires all new students to sign documentation regarding meningitis. 32 JANUARY 2010 PROGRAMS OF STUDY -- OHIO Campus Locations Bachelor & Associate Degree Programs Allied Health B&SC Code 312 314 375 301 303 333 336 570 572 573 334 338 350 575 305 383 389 396 398 384 387 574 578 380 379 369 CIP Code 51.0716 51.0716 51.0801 52.0301 52.0301 52.0299 52.0299 52.0201 52.0201 52.0201 52.1001 52.1001 15.0303 15.0399 52.0401 11.1002 11.1002 11.1003 11.1003 43.0103 43.0103 43.0103 43.0103 22.0302 22.0302 51.1601 Cleveland Downtown X X X Eastlake Parma Medical Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AAB (2) Medical Administrative Assistant Online Associate Degree AAB (2) Medical Assisting Associate Degree AAS (1) Business X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Accounting Associate Degree AAB (2) Accounting Online Associate Degree AAB (2) Business Associate Degree AAB (2) Business Online Associate Degree AAB (2) General Management Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (4) Information Technology Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (4) General Management Online Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (4) Human Resources Specialist Associate Degree AAB (2) Human Resources Specialist Online Associate Degree AAB (2) Electronic Technology X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Electronic Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology BS (3) Information Technology Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AAB (2) Networking Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Networking Technology Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Security Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Security Technology Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Legal X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Criminal Justice Associate Degree AAS (1) Criminal Justice Online Associate Degree AAB (1) Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Criminal Justice Online Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Paralegal Studies Associate Degree AAS (1) Paralegal Studies Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Nursing Nursing Associate Degree AAS (1) Note: All programs may not be offered at every campus every semester. (1) Associate of Applied Science (2) Associate of Applied Business (3) Bachelor of Science (4) Bachelor of Business Administration See the "Programs of Study" section for a description of programs and degree plans. PROGRAMS OF STUDY Ohio The Medical Assisting programs at the Cleveland Downtown, Eastlake and Parma campuses are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), on recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). The Nursing programs offered at the Eastlake and Parma campuses are viewed as one accredited program by the Ohio Board of Nursing and the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). JANUARY 2010 All three Ohio Campuses are authorized by the state of Ohio to confer Associate and Baccalaureate Degrees. These degrees are also approved by the Ohio Board of Regents. 33 GRANT AND SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS Ohio Bryant & Stratton College Academic Excellence Award This scholarship is awarded by Bryant & Stratton College each year to high school students who demonstrate academic excellence and are interested in continuing their achievements in a program offered at Bryant & Stratton College. Each of the three Cleveland campuses makes available a full-tuition scholarship. Scholarships are paid out over four semesters provided the recipient maintains consecutive semester enrollment, a GPA of 3.20 or better in an associate degree program, and adheres to all policies as outlined in the academic catalog. High school students who are scheduled to graduate from an accredited high school and who have achieved a cumulative high school grade point average of 3.20 are eligible to apply. All applicants must submit a scholarship application, a writing sample, two letters of recommendation, and participate in an employer interview process. Bryant & Stratton College requires that award recipients apply for state and federal grants and that any funds awarded under such grant programs be applied first toward the student's tuition. The Bryant & Stratton College Academic Excellence Award will then be applied to any remaining tuition and/or textbook balance. Additional information and applications are available in high school guidance offices and Bryant & Stratton College admission offices. Academic Excellence Award (AEA) Bryant & Stratton College bestows Academic Excellence Awards annually to high school students who demonstrate academic dedication and enroll in one of the College's programs. Each Cleveland campus has an $8,000 scholarship fund. Scholarships are dispersed over four semesters provided the recipient maintains consecutive semester enrollment, a minimum GPA of 2.50 in an associate degree program, and adheres to all policies outlined in the academic catalog. High school students who are scheduled to graduate from an accredited high school and who have achieved a cumulative high school grade point average of 2.50 are eligible to apply. Additional information and applications are available through high school guidance offices and from Bryant & Stratton College admissions offices. Bryant & Stratton College requires that award recipients apply for state and federal grants and that any funds awarded under such grant programs be applied first toward the student's tuition. The Academic Excellence Award will then be applied to any remaining tuition and/or textbook balance. All applicants must submit a scholarship application, a writing sample, two letters of recommendation, and participate in an employer interview process. Bryant & Stratton College Articulation Scholarship To show support of high schools in their articulation efforts and to help high schools promote their articulation programs, Bryant & Stratton College has created an Articulation Scholarship program. The high schools are awarded the $500 Articulation Scholarship. The high school administration will select the student(s) who will receive the scholarship(s) according to the high school's own selection criteria. As students are awarded the scholarships, the high school official (principal, teacher, counselor) will submit the name of the student to the Director of Admissions of Bryant & Stratton College and a formal scholarship certificate will be prepared. Matching Scholarships Bryant & Stratton College will match the dollar value of any scholarship awarded to any student from a professional organization that has a valid academic scholarship program. The organization can not be connected with Bryant & Stratton College. Organizations, typically 501 (c)(3)s, may include but are not limited to unions, civic or fraternal groups, philanthropic societies, educational entities and local or national professional groups and business firms. Scholarships from private or public businesses must be reviewed and pre-approved by the College. The focus of the review will include history of the program, past award amounts, award criteria, breadth of eligible award recipients, and potential annual total award amounts. Scholarships provided to employees of public or private businesses must include criteria in addition to employment to be eligible for a matching scholarship. Internal College-specific scholarships are excluded from the matching program. The dollar value will be applied towards tuition only up to the full value of the scholarship that qualifies the student for this program, and in no instance will the amount exceed the total tuition for the program in which the student originally enrolled. The value of the scholarship will not exceed the cost of tuition after the amount of state grant awards has been applied. Bryant & Stratton College matching scholarships are funded on a consecutive semester basis without interruption over the award period identified by the granting agency. Documented proof of the organization's academic scholarship program must accompany the Bryant & Stratton College matching scholarship application and must include written and specific eligibility criteria and/or conditions for awarding scholarship funds. Bryant & Stratton College matching scholarship applications are available through the admissions office at each Bryant & Stratton College campus. Applications should be submitted no later than two weeks prior to the start of classes. Institutional Grant Program The Bryant & Stratton College Institutional Grant Program is a needsbased grant program designed to assist students in meeting the cost of tuition and fees. The grant is based upon your family's adjusted gross income for the previous year. The program is administered on a first come-first served basis for eligible students. The total amount of this grant and all Title IV funds cannot exceed the total cost of tuition and fees. To be eligible, students must meet the following criteria: 1. Apply for the most Title IV funds available at the time of enrollment. 2. Maintain a minimum CGPA of 2.0. A student's eligibility for the grant will be determined at the point the student is packaged for financial aid. Dependent upon a student's financial need, the amount of the grant may range from $110 to $1,800 per semester. The total amount of the award, over the course of the student's program of study, shall not exceed $7,200. The amount of each grant is determined using the Institutional Grant Schedule available at the campus financial aid office. 34 JANUARY 2010 Bryant & Stratton College Bachelor Articulation Scholarship Awarded to graduates from an accredited college with an associate degree. The value of the scholarship is $1,000 and the graduates are chosen by a scholarship committee. The student must have earned a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 and plan to attend as a full-time matriculating student. Career Services - Placement Support For the student cohorts of the 2007 -2008 academic year, there were a total of 266 available graduates from the three Ohio Bryant & Stratton College campuses. Of these graduates, 242 or 91% were placed in their chosen career field. Bryant & Stratton College Technical Challenge Scholarship (Cleveland Downtown Campus Only) Bryant & Stratton College Technical Excellence Scholarship (Cleveland Downtown Campus only) Awarded by Bryant & Stratton College, Cleveland Downtown Campus, each year to high school students who plan to pursue a technical degree. Participation in the Bryant & Stratton College's Technical Challenge is required. One scholarship will be available for each high school class that participates in the Technical Challenge during the school year. The instructor of that class will choose the recipient of the award. Twenty-five one-time scholarships valuing $500 each will be awarded in the fall semester only. Awarded by Bryant & Stratton College, Cleveland Downtown Campus, each year to high school students who plan to pursue a technical degree. Applicants must have participated in Bryant & Stratton's Technical Challenge, with one of the winning classes in Electronics. One scholarship will be available for each winning high school class that participates in the Technical Challenge during the school year. Two one-time scholarships valued at $1,000 each will be awarded in the fall semester only. Early Acceptance Scholarship Program The Bryant & Stratton College campuses can award one-time scholarships of $500 each to students who complete the entire enrollment process by a deadline predetermined and specified by the local scholarship committees at each campus. To be eligible for the award a student must: Meet with an admissions representative for a personal interview to determine program selection; Complete an application for enrollment in the spring or fall semester; Submit an essay that addresses these questions: - "Why are you interested in Bryant & Stratton College?" - "Why are you the best candidate for the scholarship?" - "How do you plan on using your Bryant & Stratton College education?" The selection of winners will be based on the highest evaluation scores and the strength of the application as determined by the Admissions Committee. 35 JANUARY 2010 PROGRAMS OF STUDY -- VIRGINIA Campus Locations Bachelor & Associate Degree Programs B&SC Code CIP Code Richmond Virginia Beach Allied Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Health Services Administration Online Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Medical Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AAS (1) Medical Administrative Assistant Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Medical Assisting Associate Degree AAS (1) Medical Reimbursement & Coding Online AAS (1) Business Accounting Associate Degree AAS (1) Accounting Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Business Associate Degree AAS (1) Business Online Associate Degree AAS (1) General Management Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (2) General Management Online Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (2) Information Technology Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (2) Human Resources Specialist Associate Degree AAS (1) Human Resources Specialist Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Financial Services Financial Services Bachelor of Science BS (3) Financial Services Online Bachelor of Science BS (3) Information Technology Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AAS (1) Networking Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Networking Technology Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Security Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Security Technology Online Associate Degree AAS(1) Virtual Office Information Management Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Virtual Office Information Management Online Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Legal Criminal Justice Associate Degree AAS (1) Criminal Justice Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Criminal Justice Online Bachelor of Science Degree BS (3) Paralegal Studies Associate Degree AAS (1) Paralegal Studies Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Nursing Nursing Associate Degree AAS (1) Note: All programs may not be offered at every campus every semester. 582 583 312 313 375 317 301 302 333 332 570 571 572 334 337 581 580 305 383 388 396 397 510 511 384 386 574 576 380 381 369 51.2211 51.2211 51.0716 51.0716 51.0801 51.0716 52.0301 52.0301 52.0299 52.0299 52.0201 52.0201 52.0201 52.1001 52.1001 52.0804 52.0804 52.0401 11.1002 11.1002 11.1003 11.1003 52.0402 52.0402 43.0103 43.0103 43.0103 43.0103 22.0302 22.0302 51.1601 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X (1) Associate of Applied Science (2) Bachelor of Business Administration (3) Bachelor of Science See the "Programs of Study" section for a description of programs and degree plans. JANUARY 2010 PROGRAMS OF STUDY -- VIRGINIA Bryant & Stratton College is approved by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) to confer the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree and Baccalaureate degrees. The Medical Assisting program at both campuses is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) on recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). Bryant & Stratton College is approved by the Virginia State Approving Agency for the training of veterans and other eligible persons and by the United States Department of Education for various federally funded programs. The College is approved for administering educational programs sponsored by state agencies such as the state rehabilitative services. The nursing degree program offered at the Richmond campus is approved by the Virginia Board of Nursing. 36 SCHOLARSHIPS Community Scholarships The campuses offer scholarships to recent high school graduates, adult learners, online learners and students in the Bachelor degree program. Please refer to the general scholarship section for complete details and criteria. Refunds - Virginia Only For a student who officially withdraws from the Virginia Campuses of Bryant & Stratton College, a refund will be computed according to the following guidelines: (a) A student who enters College but withdraws during the first 1/4 (25%) of the period is entitled to receive as a refund a minimum of 50% of the stated cost of the course or program for the period. (b) A student who enters College but withdraws after completing 1/4 (25%), but less than 1/2 (50%) of the period is entitled to receive as a refund a minimum of 25% of the stated cost of the course or program for the period. (c) A student who withdraws after completing 1/2 (50%), or more than 1/2 (50%), of the period is not entitled to a refund. SOCNAV/SOCAD Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Programs The SOC program was designed to provide educational opportunities to servicemembers, who, because they frequently moved from place to place, had trouble completing college degrees. SOC member Colleges make it easier to obtain college degrees rather than just accumulate course credits. The Bryant & Stratton College Virginia Beach campus is a member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium and the SOC Degree Network System. Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC), established in 1972, is a consortium of national higher education associations and more than 1,700 institutional members. SOC Consortium institutional members subscribe to principles and criteria to ensure that quality academic programs are available to military students, their family members, civilian employees of the Department of Defense (DoD) and Coast Guard, and veterans. A list of current SOC Consortium member institutions can be found on the SOC Web site at http://www.soc.aascu.org/. SOC Degree Network System The SOC Degree Network System (DNS) consists of a subset of SOC Consortium member institutions selected by the military Services to deliver specific Associate and Bachelor's degree programs to service members and their families. Institutional members of the SOC DNS agree to special requirements and obligations that provide military students, their spouses and college-age children with opportunities to complete college degrees without suffering loss of academic credit due to changes of duty station. SOC operates the 2- and 4-year Degree Network System for the Army (SOCAD), Navy (SOCNAV), Marine Corps (SOCMAR), and Coast Guard (SOCCOAST). Refer to the SOC Degree Network System-2 and -4 Handbooks to view Associate and Bachelor's degree programs, location offerings, and college information. An electronic version of the Handbook is posted on the SOC Web site, http://www.soc.aascu.org, on the SOCAD, SOCNAV, SOCMAR, and SOCCOAST home pages. Career Services - Placement Support JANUARY 2010 For the student cohorts of the 2007 -2008 academic year, there were a total of 191 available graduates from the two Virginia Bryant & Stratton College campuses. Of these graduates, 179 or 94% were placed in their chosen career field. 37 PROGRAMS OF STUDY -- WISCONSIN Campus Locations Bachelor and Associate Degree Programs B&SC Code CIP Code Milwaukee Campus Wauwatosa Bayshore Allied Health Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science Degree BS (4) Health Services Administration Online Bachelor of Science Degree BS (4) Medical Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AAS (1) Medical Administrative Assistant Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Medical Assisting Associate Degree AAS (1) Medical Reimbursement & Coding Online AAS (1) Applied Design Graphic Design Associate Degree AAS (1) Interactive Media Design Associate Degree AAS (1) Business Accounting Associate Degree AAS (1) Accounting Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Business Associate Degree AAS (1) Business Online Associate Degree AAS (1) General Management Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (2) General Management Online Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (2) Information Technology Bachelor of Business Administration BBA (2) Human Resources Specialist Associate Degree AAS (1) Human Resources Specialist Online Associate Degree AAS (1) 582 583 312 316 375 317 340 347 301 302 333 332 570 577 572 334 339 51.2211 51.2211 51.0716 51.0716 51.0801 51.0716 50.0402 50.0401 52.0301 52.0301 52.0299 52.0299 52.0201 52.0201 52.0201 52.1001 52.1001 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Financial Services Financial Services Bachelor of Science BS (4) Financial Services Online Bachelor of Science BS (4) Information Technology Administrative Assistant Associate Degree AAS (1) Networking Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Networking Technology Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Security Technology Associate Degree AAS (1) Security Technology Online Associate Degree AAS(1) Legal Criminal Justice Associate Degree AAS (1) Criminal Justice Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science Degree BS (4) Criminal Justice Online Bachelor of Science Degree BS (4) Paralegal Studies Associate Degree AAS (1) Paralegal Studies Online Associate Degree AAS (1) Nursing Associate Degree Nursing ADN (3) Note: All programs may not be offered at every campus every semester. 581 580 305 383 388 396 397 384 387 574 576 380 381 369 52.0804 52.0804 52.0401 11.1002 11.1002 11.1003 11.1003 43.0103 43.0103 43.0103 43.0103 22.0302 22.0302 51.1601 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X (1) Associate of Applied Science (2) Bachelor of Business Administration (3) Associate Degree Nursing (4) Bachelor of Science Wisconsin students may enroll in Online degree programs approved through the Virginia State Education Department and/or the New York State Education Department. Refer to the "Programs of Study" sections for information specific to degrees available Online. Students earning their degree as a dedicated Online Student will receive their diploma through Bryant & Stratton College from the state where the program is approved. JANUARY 2010 See the "Programs of Study" section for a description of programs and degree plans. PROGRAMS OF STUDY Wisconsin The State of Wisconsin Educational Approval Board (EAB) has approved the programs, which Bryant & Stratton College offers, and the EAB has authorized the College to confer the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree and Baccalaureate degrees. The Medical Assisting Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), on recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB). The Nursing program offered at the Wauwatosa campus is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). 38 SCHOLARSHIPS Scholarships are available to recent high school graduates, adult learners, Online learners and students in the Bachelor Degree program. See the general scholarship section of this catalog for details and criteria. Refunds Wisconsin only Refunds will be computed according to the following guidelines: A student who withdraws or is dismissed after attending at least one class or submitting at least one lesson, but before completing 60% of the potential units of instruction in the current enrollment period, shall be entitled to a pro rata refund, as calculated below, less any amounts owed by the student for the current enrollment period. 1. Pro rata refund shall be determined as the number of units remaining after the last unit completed by the student, divided by the total number of units in the enrollment period, rounded downward to the nearest ten percent. Pro rata refund is the resulting percent applied to the total tuition and other required costs paid by the student for the current enrollment period. 2. Refunds shall be paid within 40 days after the effective date of termination. 3. No refund is required for any student who withdraws or is dismissed after completing 60% of the potential units of instruction in the current enrollment period unless a student withdraws due to mitigating circumstances, which are those that directly prohibit pursuit of a program and which are beyond the student's control. The Career Services personnel assist students to secure required internship experiences. Required hours are tracked, site visits occur, and program/site/student evaluations are conducted. Some employers and/or specific employment positions, including internship sites, will require a personal background check. The results of this background check may impact placement; criminal records and negative information often limit placement. Of particular importance in this area are placements that involve care giving, controlled substances, and fiscal responsibility and information systems. All students should note that the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act prohibits discrimination because of a criminal record or pending charge, unless the criminal record or charge is substantially related to other circumstances of a particular job or licensed activity as noted above. Attendance Students will be administratively dismissed after three (3) weeks of consecutive absences. Students may appeal the dismissal with the Academic Services Department. Continuous Placement Assistance All graduates who have successfully completed a degree program at Bryant & Stratton College are eligible for placement assistance. Graduates of Bryant & Stratton may receive placement assistance at any Bryant & Stratton location. Employment Results Bryant & Stratton College evaluates program success in utilizing a variety of data, some of which includes meeting course outcomes as evidenced in student graded assessments, graduation rates, placement, rates, salaries secured and retention at the worksite after placement. In addition the college secures feedback from alumni and employers about programs and services to continually improve the curriculum and support services. Leaves of Absence Bryant & Stratton College does not recognize leaves of absence except for active military duty. Career Services/Placement Services Bryant & Stratton College's Career Services are a vital part of the educational program. Counseling, career assessment and instructional help prepare the student for their chosen career. Specific instruction within the classroom and supported by Career Services includes resume and job application preparation, interviewing, networking, portfolio development and developing critical workplace competencies. Assistance provided by the Career Services department and classroom instruction guide students in securing full-time employment upon graduation. The Career Services department also assists with part-time and temporary employment. For the student cohorts of the 2007-2008 academic year, there were a total of 156 available graduates from the two Wisconsin Bryant & Stratton College campuses. Of these graduates, 148 or 95% were placed in their chosen career field. Graduates of a degree program have access to an active placement service and, although the securing of a position cannot be guaranteed, every avenue is pursued to assist you in obtaining desirable employment. With a student release, the Career Services department submits resumes to pertinent job openings that have been secured. They also assist in setting up interviews with prospective employers. Records Retention The College retains student financial and academic records for a period of six years. Academic transcripts are permanently retained. 39 JANUARY 2010 ACADEMIC CALENDAR Campus-Based Students SEMESTERS: WINTER 2010 - FALL 2011 WINTER SEMESTER New Year's Day Beginning of Semester Martin Luther King Day Presidents' Day End of Semester SPRING SEMESTER Beginning of Semester Memorial Day Independence Day End of Semester FALL SEMESTER Labor Day Beginning of Semester Veterans Day Thanksgiving Recess End of Semester 2010 January 1 January 13 January 18 February 15 April 24 2010 May 5 May 31 July 5 August 14 2010 September 6 September 8 November 11 November 25-26 December 17 2011 January 1 January 12 January 17 February 21 April 23 2011 May 4 May 30 July 4 August 13 2011 September 5 September 7 November 11 November 24-25 December 17 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT DAY WINTER 2010 Albany Amherst Bayshore Buffalo Cleveland Downtown Eastlake Greece Henrietta Parma Richmond Southtowns Syracuse Downtown Syracuse North Virginia Beach Milwaukee East (Downtown) Milwaukee West (Wauwatosa) March 23, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 23, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 23, 2010 March 23, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 23, 2010 March 23, 2010 March 24, 2010 March 23, 2010 March 24, 2010 JANUARY 2010 See your academic advisor for registration information Note: Bryant & Stratton College reserves the right to change dates without notice. 40 ACADEMIC CALENDAR Distance Learners* SEMESTERS: FALL 2009 - SPRING 2011 WINTER SEMESTER Online Winter I Session Begins Online Winter I Session Ends Online Winter II Session Begins Online Winter II Session Ends SPRING SEMESTER Online Spring I Session Begins Online Spring I Session Ends Online Spring II Session Begins Online Spring II Session Ends FALL SEMESTER Online Fall I Session Begins Online Fall I Session Ends Online Fall II Session Begins Online Fall II Session Ends 2010 January 13 March 1 March 3 April 19 2010 May 5 June 21 June 23 August 9 2010 September 8 October 25 October 27 December 13 2011 January 12 February 28 March 2 April 18 2011 May 4 June 20 June 22 August 8 2011 September 7 October 24 October 26 December 12 Portfolio Development activities are provided over the course of each session. *Distance Learners: Students taking online coursework Online classes available 24/7 including holidays Note: Bryant & Stratton College reserves the right to change dates without notice. 41 JANUARY 2010 Important Notice to All Students: Effective for the Spring (May) 2010 semester, a planned curriculum revision will result in selected course exchanges, based on number or title updates. All previously completed courses that apply to the enrolled degree plan will satisfy the graduation requirements outlined in the catalog at the time of enrollment. If your degree plan identifies one of the courses listed in the left column below, you will be scheduled for the exchange course depicted on the right column for future semesters. If you have questions about the course exchange process for next semester, please meet with your academic advisor or dean. Courses Prior to 5/2010 Course Exchanges Effective 5/2010 AHLT 236 Advanced Billing AHLT 255 Advanced Coding ALHT 235 Healthcare Reimbursement/Billing Emphasis ALHT 250 Coding I BUSS 103 Introduction to Human Resource Functions BUSS 104 Employee/Labor Relations BUSS 107 Introduction to Compensation & Benefits BUSS 113 Law & Ethics in the Business Environment BUSS 133 Employment Law BUSS 204 Employee Relations BUSS 207 Payroll Records & Procedures BUSS 208 Employee Training & Development BUSS 217 Recruiting, Selection, and Staffing BUSS 225 Human Resources Management BUSS 227 Payroll Administration BUSS 261 Internship/Capstone Experience COMM 100 Introduction to Information Literacy and Research COMM 200 Communication theory and Oral Communications CSCI 100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL 100 Composition & Research ENGL101 Fundamentals of Research and Writing ENGL 110 Oral Presentations ENGL 230 Writing for Business ENGL 250 Intermediate Research and Writing ENGL 305 Advanced Research & Writing INFT110 Information Technology II LIBS100 Introduction to Information Literacy and Research NSCI 280 Ecology OFST 261 Internship/Capstone Experience JANUARY 2010 MIBC 236 Advanced Billing MIBC 255 Advanced Coding MIBC 235 Healthcare Reimbursement/Billing Emphasis MIBC 250 Coding I HURS 103 Introduction to Human Resource Functions HURS 104 Employee/Labor Relations HURS 107 Introduction to Compensation & Benefits HURS 113 Law & Ethics in the Business Environment HURS 133 Employment Law HURS 204 Employee Relations HURS 207 Payroll Records and Procedures HURS 208 Employee Training and Development HURS 217 Recruiting, Selection and Staffing HURS 225 Human Resources Management HURS 227 Payroll Administration HURS 260 Internship/Capstone Experience COMM 150 Introduction to Information Literacy and Research COMM 201 Public Speaking and Rhetorical Persuasion INSM 180 History and Practice of Information Systems ENGL 101 Research and Writing I ENGL 101 Research and Writing I ENGL 250 Research and Writing II ENGL 250 Research and Writing II ENGL 305 Research & Writing III COMM 201 Public Speaking and Rhetorical Persuasion INFT 110 Advanced Information Technology COMM 150 Introduction to Information Literacy and Research NSCI 280 Ecology; Greening of the Planet MIBC 260 Internship/Capstone Experience PHIL 250 Practices in Analytic Reasoning & Critical Thinking PHIL 250 Practices in Analytic Reasoning & Critical Thinking PSYC 101 Principles of Psychology SOSC 102 Principles of Sociology SOSC 102 Principles of Sociology PHI 150 Introduction to Logic and reasoning for Critical Thinkers PHIL 201 Critical Thinking PSYC 200 Psychology for the Disciplines SOSC 101 Human Relations SOSC 102 Introduction to Sociology 42 Bryant & Stratton College 43 Programs of Study and Degree Plans Bachelor of Business Administration Program Curriculum Graduates of the Bachelor of Business Administration program are prepared for professional careers in business, government, and nonprofit organizations. Courses in this unique program provide students with the skill sets required of knowledgeable workers in this Information Age. Graduates will have the problem solving, strategic planning, communication, interpersonal, and technology application skills needed to meet operational demands and resolve contemporary business problems. Through exposure to active learning techniques, practical application of research methods, team projects, presentations, and internships, students will be prepared not only for the challenges of management positions, but also for a life of continued learning - both at work and in their private lives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Business Administration program will be able to: General Management Bachelor of Business Administration Campus Program 570 Online Program 571/573/577 (Offered at select New York Campuses and all Ohio, Virginia & Wisconsin Campuses) Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements Apply contemporary knowledge and skill sets to work effectively in the business community. Display a working knowledge of strategic business applications, evaluative techniques, and management processes as well as the role business plays in a global economy. Demonstrate sensitivity to and appreciation for ethical issues and deport themselves in an ethical manner at all times. Display an appreciation for and understanding of humankind's accomplishments in world affairs, arts & humanities, and the social sciences. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. ACCT110 Accounting Principles I ACCT120 Accounting Principles II ACCT220 Financial Analysis BUSS100 Business Principles BUSS110 Marketing Principles BUSS130 Business Law BUSS215 Management Principles BUSS260 Internship/Capstone Experience BUSS320 Marketing Management BUSS325 Global Management BUSS340 Operations Management BUSS410 Performance Management BUSS420 Project Management BUSS450 Strategic Management BUSS460 Practicum and Capstone Project INFT110 Advanced Information Technology Major Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12 60 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12 60 Liberal Arts Requirements CSCI100/ INSM180 ECON220 ECON325 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 ENGL305 MATH103 LIBS100 MATH290 PHIL201 PHIL310 PSYC310 SOSC101 SOSC215 SOSC301 Introduction to Computer Science Macroeconomics Microeconomics Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Advanced Research & Writing Survey of Mathematics Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Statistics Critical Thinking Logic and Reasoning Organizational Psychology Human Relations Career Management Interpersonal Relations & Group Dynamics Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 120 44 JANUARY 2010 Information Technology Bachelor of Business Administration Campus Program 572 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements (Offered only at the Ohio, Virginia and Wisconsin Campuses) Graduates of the Bachelor of Business Administration program are prepared for professional careers in business, government, and nonprofit organizations. Courses in this unique program provide students with the skill sets required of knowledgeable workers in this Information Age. Graduates will have the problem solving, strategic planning, communication, interpersonal, and technology application skills needed to meet operational demands and resolve contemporary business problems. Through exposure to active learning techniques, practical application of research methods, team projects, presentations, and internships, students will be prepared not only for the challenges of management positions, but also for a life of continued learning - both at work and in their private lives. Graduates of the Bachelor of Business Administration program will be able to: Apply contemporary knowledge and skill sets to work effectively in the business community. Display a working knowledge of strategic business applications, evaluative techniques, and management processes as well as the role business plays in a global economy. Demonstrate sensitivity to and appreciation for ethical issues and deport themselves in an ethical manner at all times. Display an appreciation for and understanding of humankind's accomplishments in world affairs, arts & humanities, and the social sciences. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. ACCT110 Accounting Principles I 3 ACCT120 Accounting Principles II 3 ACCT220 Financial Analysis 3 BUSS100 Business Principles 3 BUSS110 Marketing Principles 3 BUSS215 Management Principles 3 BUSS260 Internship/Capstone Experience 3 BUSS320 Marketing Management 3 BUSS340 Operations Management 3 BUSS410 Performance Management 3 BUSS420 Project Management 3 BUSS460 Practicum and Capstone Project 3 INFT111 Introduction to Information Technology 3 INFT120 Programming I 3 INFT230 Data Communications & Networks 3 INFT325 Information Security Management 3 INFT330 Managing Information Systems & Networks 3 Major Electives 9 Major Component 60 Liberal Arts Requirements CSCI100/ INSM180 ECON220 ECON325 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 ENGL305 LIBS100 MATH103 MATH290 PHIL201 PHIL310 PSYC310 SOSC101 SOSC215 SOSC301 Introduction to Computer Science Macroeconomics Microeconomics Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Advanced Research & Writing Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Statistics Critical Thinking Logic and Reasoning Organizational Psychology Human Relations Career Management Interpersonal Relations & Group Dynamics 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12 60 Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 120 45 JANUARY 2010 Criminal Justice Bachelors of Science Degree Campus Program 574 Online Program 576/578 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements (Offered only at the Virginia, Ohio and Wisconsin Campuses) The design of the Criminal Justice baccalaureate degree program enhances learning acquired in associate-level Criminal Justice degree programs through a rigorous study of Criminal Justice. This includes the study of ethics, as well as the variety of deviant and/or criminal behavior that contribute to crime. Students study the Criminal Justice administrative structure, which includes analysis of international, federal, state, and local agencies involved directly and indirectly in Criminal Justice. Students also examine the concept of crime through the study of the varied criminal activity that occurs in today's society. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field. Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in positions that include Police/detective, First-line supervisor, Manager of police/detectives, Fish and game wardens, Border agent, Homeland Security agent, Social worker, Social/human service assistant, Counselor, Parole officer/probation officer, and Correctional Treatment Specialist Graduates of the Criminal Justice Baccalaureate Degree program will be able to: Apply a comprehensive understanding and knowledge of the criminal justice system, criminology and victimology, juvenile justice system, public administration/policy, criminal and deviant behavior, criminal law and procedure through the evaluation of a variety of contemporary criminal justice issues. Display proficiencies in policing philosophies through the assessment of various investigation and surveillance techniques Examine correctional practices in the United States to criticize the various philosophies of punishment, sentencing practices, victim's rights and community-based corrections. Evaluate the major criminological theories of crime causation including classical and contemporary theories. Distinguish the roles and challenges faced by the police, courts, and corrections and appraise their interrelationship within our justice system and justice systems internationally. Propose the characteristics of a sound ethical framework necessary to criminal justice professionalism through the review of various ethical theories and challenges. Appraise the value of leadership among various criminal justice related agencies. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. CRJU100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 CRJU101 Criminology 3 CRJU102 Policing 3 CRJU105 Corrections 3 CRJU110 Criminal Courts 3 CRJU 150 Juvenile Justice 3 CRJU200 Criminal Law 3 CRJU 210 Criminal Investigation 3 CRJU 222 Criminal Procedure 3 CRJU260 Internship/Capstone Experience 3 CRJU 300 Ethical Dilemmas and Challenges in CRJU 3 CRJU 320 Criminal Behavior 3 CRJU 330 Victimology 3 CRJU 343 Criminal Justice Administration 3 CRJU 400 Comparative Criminal Justice 3 CRJU 423 Terrorism and Homeland Security 3 CRJU 460 Practicum and Capstone Project 3 Major Electives 15 66 Liberal Arts Requirements CSCI100 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 ENGL305 LIBS100 MATH103 MATH290 PHIL201 PHIL310 PSYC310 SOSC101 SOSC215 SOSC301 Introduction to Computer Science Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Advanced Research and Writing Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Statistics Critical Thinking Logic and Reasoning Organizational Psychology Human Relations Career Management Interpersonal Relations & Group Dynamics 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 54 Arts and Humanities Elective Social Sciences Elective Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 120 46 JANUARY 2010 Electronic Engineering Technology Bachelor of Science Degree Campus Program 575 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements (Offered only at the Cleveland Downtown Campus) The Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology (B.S.E.E.T.) program prepares students for advanced industrial work in a variety of electronics fields. Computer solutions in electronics applications are emphasized through extensive hands-on training and exercises with current industrial software and hardware tools. Students receive focused tutoring in small groups on embedded software and hardware applications, industrial and power electronics, Programmable Logic Devices, MATLAB and C++ programming, as well as use of simulation tools such as MULTISIM. Training is also provided in the related electronics fields of Automatic Control and Quality Control. Students accepted into the bachelor's program must have an associate degree in electronic technology from an accredited post-secondary institution. All applications and the acceptance of transfer credit will be reviewed by the Dean at Bryant & Stratton College. Applicants to the bachelor degree program may be required to complete additional courses in order to be fully prepared to enroll in the required courses. The B.S.E.E.T. program prepares graduates with advanced technical skills for potential employment in a variety of capacities in military, industrial, and commercial environments. Positions include, but are not limited to, roles in sustaining engineering, field and application engineering, sales and marketing, production quality control, test engineering, and customer support. Graduates of the Electronic Engineering Technology Bachelor Degree program will be able to: Utilize their technical skills, abilities, and knowledge to improve existing systems and to design new systems. Communicate with clients, analyze client needs and wants, and recommend appropriate action. With experience, graduates may qualify for supervisory or leadership positions in the technical workforce. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. ACCT220 BUSS215 BUSS310 BUSS420 ELET325 ELET350 ELET410 ELET420 ELET430 ELET440 ELET450 INFT400 Financial Analysis Management Principles Marketing and Sales Project Management Advanced Analog & Digital Electronics Introduction to PLD Applications Electronic Instrumentation & Interface Control Circuit Stability & Modeling Embedded Industrial Systems Power Electronics Systems Advanced Electronics & Senior Project Programming III 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 36 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Liberal Arts Requirements ECON325 MATH301 MATH303 MATH311 MATH401 MATH403 PHYS400 Microeconomics Calculus Probability and Engineering Reliability Calculus for Electrical Engineering Calculus for Signals & Systems Programming in Matlab Physics Select one course from each of the following: Arts and Humanities Social Science 3 3 27 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 63 *Bridge Courses - Transfer students enrolling in the Bachelor's degree program may be required to complete courses at the Associate degree level if they have not satisfied prerequisite course requirements prior to enrollment in the bachelor degree program. 47 JANUARY 2010 Financial Services Bachelor of Science Degree Campus Program 581 Online Program 580 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements (Offered only in Virginia, Wisconsin and Online) The Bachelor of Science in Financial Services degree program prepares learners for an exciting degree in the financial industry in accounting, financial planning and financial service management. The curriculum was developed to meet the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc and the Academy of Financial Services standards. The program outcomes were created in association with input from major banks, brokerage firms, accounting firms, credit counseling organizations and insurance agencies. The emphasis of the program is personal financial planning, as students are eligible to sit for the CFP Certification Exam. Personal Financial Planning is one of the most lucrative and rapidly expanding professions. Much of the growth is attributable to the maturation of the `Baby Boomers' population; those entering their peak earning years and needing assistance to effectively manage and protect wealth. To prepare students for this profession, the program requires student to take business, accounting, and finance courses in addition to the essential liberal arts course series required for career success and mobility. The students will also develop knowledge, skills and competency in estate planning, investments, insurance, tax, retirement planning, and employee benefits planning as part of this specialized degree program. Graduates of the Bachelor of Science Financial Services program will be able to: Analyze and apply contemporary knowledge and skills in the financial services sector. Demonstrate strategic and tactical financial planning abilities. Analyze and evaluate client cases to prepare solutions that meet immediate need and long term goals. Use legal and ethical principles to analyze and apply practices to preserve wealth. Meet eligibility requirements for the rigorous multi-part CFP Exam. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematical and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. ACCT110 Accounting Principles I ACCT120 Accounting Principles II ACCT220 Financial Analysis BUSS100 Business Principles BUSS215 Management Principles BUSS340 Operations Management BUSS450 Strategic Management ECON220 Macroeconomics ECON325 Microeconomics INFT110 Advanced Information Technology FINA200 Finance Principles FINA260 Internship/Capstone Experience FINA371* Personal Financial Planning FINA372* Insurance Planning FINA373* Investment Planning FINA374* Income Tax Planning FINA375* Retirement Planning FINA476* Estate Planning FINA460* Practicum and Capstone Project Major Electives 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 60 Liberal Arts Requirements COMM100 Intro. to Information Literacy and Research or LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy and Research COMM200 Communication Theory and Oral Communication or ENGL110 Oral Presentations CSCI 100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL101 Fundamentals of Research & Writing or ENGL100 Composition & Research ENGL250 Intermediate Research & Writing or ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology ENGL305 Advanced Research & Writing MATH103 Survey of Mathematics MATH290 Statistics NSCI280 Ecology PHIL150 Introduction to Logic & Reasoning for Critical Thinkers or PHIL201 Critical thinking PHIL310 Logic & Reasoning PSYC 200 Psychology for the Disciplines or SOSC215 Career Management PSYC310 Organizational Psychology SOSC102 Introduction to Sociology or SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC301 Interpersonal Relations & Group Dynamics Liberal Arts Electives Liberal Arts Requirements Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15 60 120 The Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. requires 3 years full-time work experience as outlined on their website at www.cfp.net. JANUARY 2010 *This course will only be offered online. 48 Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science Degree Campus Program 582 Online Program 583 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements ACCT110 Accounting I AHLT100 Medical Terminology AHLT111 Introduction to Healthcare AHLT120 Anatomy & Physiology I AHLT125 Anatomy & Physiology II AHLT235 Healthcare Reimbursement/Billing Emphasis AHLT245 Medical Office Procedures/Electronic Records BUSS410 Performance Management HTHS260 Internship/Capstone Experience HTHS301 Health Services Management I HTHS302 Health Services Management II HTHS305 Legal Aspects of Healthcare Management HTHS310 Healthcare Information Systems Management HTHS315 Healthcare Finance & Accounting Management HTHS400 Disaster Planning & Management HTHS405 Long Term Care Management HTHS410 Health Research Methods HTHS460 Practicum and Capstone Project 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 The Bachelor of Science in Health Services Administration program is designed to prepare graduates for entry-level and assistant management positions in medical settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing care facilities, doctors' offices, and insurance companies. Health services administrators are often responsible for creating and implementing policy and procedures, hiring and supervising staff, controlling finances, ordering supplies, and coordinating plans and activities with those of other health care managers. The central focus of the program is to provide a comprehensive base in health-related knowledge and concepts and as well as the management of health services and facilities, with emphases on finance, legal aspects in healthcare, disaster planning and management, and information systems. The Bachelor of Science in Health Services Administration program prepares students to excel in decision-making skills, critical thinking, and small group communications. Research opportunities and field experiences offer students insight into real-world applications of the information and skills they learn in class and help students prepare to successfully transition into a health care administration or management career. Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Health Services Administration will be able to: Analyze and apply contemporary knowledge and skill sets to work effectively in a managerial capacity in a health services setting. Utilize effective skills in financial planning, project management, human resource development, public safety, and emergency disaster planning in health service administration. Evaluate and apply leadership skills. Use legal and ethical principles to analyze and apply management practices of health care organizations and delivery of patient care. Research information management systems to evaluate and select technologies appropriate to a particular healthcare setting. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within the community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognitive abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. 54 Liberal Arts Requirements COMM150 COMM201 ENGL101 ENGL250 ENGL305 INSM180 MATH103 MATH309 PHIL250 PHIL310 PSYC101 PSYC310 SOSC102 SOSC301 Introduction to Information Literacy and Research Public Speaking and Rhetorical Persuasion Research and Writing I Research and Writing II Research and Writing III History and Practice of Information Systems Survey of Mathematics Statistics Practices in Analytical Reasoning and Critical Thinking Logic & Reasoning Principles of Psychology Organizational Psychology Principles of Sociology Interpersonal Relations and Group Dynamics 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 42 Arts and Humanities electives Social Science electives 9 6 66 Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 9 120 49 JANUARY 2010 Virtual Office Information Management Bachelor of Science Degree Campus Program 510 Online Program 511 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements ACCT110 Accounting Principles I BUSS100 Business Principles I BUSS110 Marketing Principles BUSS215 Management Principles BUSS410 Performance Management BUSS420 Project Management VOIM110 Office Technology Software I VOIM120 21st Century Office Procedures VOIM210 Office Technology Software II VOIM220 Office Technology Software III VOIM230 Virtual Communication Management I VOIM260 Capstone Experience VOIM320 Office Technology Software IV VOIM330 Virtual Communication Management II VOIM410 Web Design and Management VOIM420 Computer Application Crisis Management VOIM430 Virtual and Social Networking Management VOIM440 Managing the Internet Business VOIM460 Capstone Experience 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Information technology and management careers are transforming at an astounding pace. Virtual workplaces, electronic correspondence, and global markets have revolutionized all businesses and industries, at home and abroad. As advances in technology continue, business minded individuals need to be prepared to use technology to advance within their chosen career field. This program of study is designed to prepare students for administrative, support, and supervisory positions in business or industrial settings, professional offices, public institutions, and government agencies. Students will become proficient in state of the art technology and equipment, workplace procedures and management, document processing and design, communication skills and decision making. Students will gain an understanding of the impact of technology on office routines and procedures and the skills necessary to utilize technology to become efficient employees that assume leadership roles within the chosen career field. In addition, students will develop the interpersonal, decision making and analytical skills required in dealing with workplace problems and situations. This program combines a well-balanced academic program with expert administrative and computer instruction to give students the diversified educational training and background needed to hold positions of responsibility and importance in many areas of the business world. Graduates of the Bachelor or Science in Virtual Office Information Management degree will be able to: Demonstrate and assess the utilization of current technologies in the management of the virtual workplace and/or business environment Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of key business processes including financial, managerial, marketing and human resource functions as it relates to the global economy Demonstrate higher-level office administration, managerial, organizational, interpersonal and technical skills required to successfully create, and assess the implementation of required office procedures. Demonstrate an advanced level of competence in computertechnology applications, hand-held devices, and the use of the internet to access, evaluate and recommend efficient means to complete high-level managerial administrative and organizational tasks Demonstrate ability to utilize current business related technologies and internet resources to identify creative solutions and alternatives to improve professional managerial productivity Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Major Electives Liberal Arts Requirements COMM150 COMM201 ENGL101 ENGL250 ENGL305 INSM180 MATH103 MATH309 PHIL250 PHIL310 PSYC101 PSYC310 NSCI280 SOSC102 SOSC301 SOSC318 Introduction to Information Literacy and Research Public Speaking and Rhetorical Persuasion Research and Writing I Research and Writing II Research and Writing III History and Practice of Information Systems Survey of Mathematics Statistics Practices in Analytical Reasoning and Critical Thinking Logic and Reasoning Principles of Psychology Organizational Psychology Ecology Principles of Sociology Interpersonal Relations and Group Dynamics Topics in Ethics: Technology and Media 3 60 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 48 Arts and Humanities electives Social Science electives 9 3 60 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 120 50 JANUARY 2010 Accounting Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 301 Online Program 302/303 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements Bryant & Stratton College's Accounting program provides the technical and critical skills needed to perform accounting functions and processes, including the acquisition, analysis and effective communication of financial information utilized in management decision making. Following graduation from this program, students will be prepared to enter such fields as general ledger accounting, managerial accounting and tax preparation. Entry-level positions may be found in the manufacturing, retail and service industries as well as the government sector. Graduates of the Accounting associate degree program will be able to: ACCT110 Accounting Principles I ACCT120 Accounting Principles II ACCT130 Tax Accounting ACCT210 Accounting Systems ACCT220 Financial Analysis ACCT230 Cost Accounting ACCT260 Internship/Capstone Experience BUSS100 Business Principles Major Electives Liberal Art Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 30 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 60 Interpret and apply generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to analyze, record, and report financial information in a variety of accounting systems. Prepare accounting reports for internal and external users. Analyze and interpret financial reports to assist users in the management decision-making process. Select and utilize appropriate information technology to complete accounting functions. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. CSCI100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy & Research 3 MATH103 Survey of Mathematics PHIL201 Critical Thinking SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC215 Career Management Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 51 JANUARY 2010 Administrative Assistant Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 305 Online Program 306 Business Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 333 Online Program 332/336 The Administrative Assistant program trains students to meet the many challenges of the electronic office. Students develop specialized knowledge in automated office equipment, word processing, office systems, accounting, and administrative skills. Graduates will be able to acquire positions as administrative support personnel in high-tech offices. Alumni of this program will function in jobs that require the selection, application, and analysis of data within computerized office systems. Graduates of the Administrative Assistant associate degree program will be able to: In this program, students develop the business skills, critical thinking skills, human relations skills and information technology skills that are required of employees in the 21st Century. Courses in this degree program provide students with a broad background in business communications, sales and marketing, accounting, business law, management principles and information technology. Graduates of the program may apply their training to any one of several career opportunities including management trainee, service or sales representative, supervisor or department manager in a variety of business fields. Individuals desiring general business or selfemployment in small business enterprises will find that this wellrounded program meets their needs. Students who complete the associate's degree program may wish to continue their education in the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) program offered at selected campuses. The BBA offers concentrations in General Management or Information Technology. Graduates of the Business associate degree program will be able to: Keyboard at a rate of wpm to an industry standard. Manage records & files systems in a work-related setting using advanced knowledge of spreadsheet and database software. Integrate advanced software applications (word-processing, e-mail, calendaring, presentations, spreadsheets, databases, web-based documents, and Windows OS) to record and store information electronically and complete business-related activities. Apply accounting principles to demonstrate ability to process payroll and manage petty cash. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements ACCT110 Accounting Principles I OFST102 Document Processing & Transcription OFST200 Document Production OFST230 Integrated Office Systems OFST260 Internship/Capstone Experience Major Electives Liberal Arts Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 15 30 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 60 Comprehend the primary functions of management, and apply those functions in the decision-making process. Apply information technology skills to specific business applications. Develop and begin to apply leadership skills in various settings. Understand and apply the principles of ethical behavior to the workplace. Demonstrate knowledge of economic and quantitative issues in the business environment. Understand the role of business in a global environment. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements JANUARY 2010 CSCI100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy & Research MATH103 Survey of Mathematics PHIL201 Critical Thinking SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC215 Career Management Open Electives ACCT110 Accounting Principles I BUSS100 Business Principles BUSS110 Marketing Principles BUSS130 Business Law BUSS215 Management Principles BUSS260 Internship/Capstone Experience ECON220 Macroeconomics INFT110 Advanced Information Technology Major Electives Liberal Arts Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 30 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 60 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation CSCI100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy & Research MATH103 Survey of Mathematics PHIL201 Critical Thinking SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC215 Career Management Open Electives 52 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation Criminal Justice Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 384 Online Program 386/387 Electronic Technology Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 350 (Offered only at the Cleveland Downtown Campus) The Criminal Justice associate degree program provides a broad understanding of the criminal justice system. The program includes the study of the United States court systems, correctional organizations, and law enforcement agencies. Students study the nature and extent of crime and delinquency, and the cause and explanation of criminal behavior. Reading, writing, and critical thinking skills are rigorously applied and developed throughout the program of study. Graduates are prepared for entry-level employment in a variety of Criminal Justice fields. The program is designed to provide graduates with a balance of theory and practice that will enhance their preparation for the criminal justice field. Graduates of the Criminal Justice associate degree program will be able to: Apply basic theories of criminal justice operations and management. Communicate effectively within the criminal justice system. Understand the laws regulating public conduct. Understand and apply concepts of community-oriented policing. Identify and resolve ethical issues in criminal justice. Follow criminal law and procedures. Use information technology skills in criminal justice applications. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognitive abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements The Electronic Technology program is designed for students who want a concentrated electronics education. Analog and digital electronics and microprocessor systems are studied in theory and practice in this program. In addition, communication and interpersonal skills are emphasized to prepare students for a successful career. Students reinforce their knowledge through hands-on laboratory applications using equipment compatible with industry standards. Graduates of the Electronic Technology program are prepared for work as entry level technicians in such areas as installation, operation, service, maintenance, and troubleshooting. Students who complete the associate degree program may wish to continue their education in the Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology (B.S.E.E.T.) program offered at our Cleveland Downtown campus. Graduates of the Electronic Technology associate degree program will be able to: Apply the basic principles of analog and digital electronics to analyze, troubleshoot, and maintain electronic equipment using standard established practices, procedures, and tools common to the industry. Utilize the ability to interpret technical documentation and make recommendations/decisions about the utilization and purchase of electronic equipment and material. Apply their existing knowledge base to improve the effectiveness of systems operation. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements CRJU100 Introduction to Criminal Justice CRJU101 Criminology CRJU102 Policing CRJU105 Corrections CRJU110 Criminal Courts CRJU150 Juvenile Justice CRJU200 Criminal Law CRJU 210 Criminal Investigation CRJU 222 Criminal Procedure CRJU260 Internship/Capstone Experience Major Elective 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 Liberal Arts Requirements ELET100 ELET101 ELET120 ELET150 ELET151 ELET200 ELET201 ELET210 ELET220 ELET230 ELET250 ELET260 CSCI100 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 MATH112 PHIL201 SOSC101 SOSC215 Circuits I Circuits I Lab Circuits II Digital Electronics Digital Electronics Lab Analog Electronics Analog Electronics Lab Industrial Electronics Communications I Microprocessor Control Programmable Controllers Internship/Capstone Experience Introduction to Computer Science Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Analytical Mathematics Critical Thinking Human Relations Career Management 27 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 60 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 67 53 JANUARY 2010 CSCI100 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 PHIL201 SOSC101 SOSC215 Introduction to Computer Science Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Critical Thinking Human Relations Career Management 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 4 4 2 4 2 3 3 3 3 3 37 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 Liberal Arts Requirements Graphic Design Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 340 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements Bryant & Stratton College's Graphic Design program focuses on the creative thinking and conceptual problem solving abilities to communicate messages to the public in order to inform, persuade, and sell. Students explore the synthesis of type, image, color, and layout to design and produce effective communication pieces. Students apply industry-standard design software to produce web sites, identity systems, annual reports, package designs, and a variety of print collateral materials. Professional graphic designers teach many of the graphic design courses. The instructors work with the students to ensure hands-on practical learning through "real-world" projects. Graduates of the program may seek employment in areas such as advertising agencies, graphic design firms, newspapers, and publishing firms. They will also possess the skills necessary to manage freelance careers. Graduates of the Graphic Design associate degree program will be able to: Interpret, prioritize, and organize concepts into complete advertising and/or graphic design presentation for print and web. Critique their own design work and the design work of others. Work effectively as part of a design team. Utilize manual and industry standard graphic design software to select, collect, and manipulate texts and images. Communicate and negotiate effectively with producers and suppliers of design products. Assemble a portfolio of finished work that is displayed in a professional manner. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. GRAD100 Introduction to Design GRAD115 Page Layout GRAD120 Typography & Layout GRAD130 Production for Design GRAD215 Digital Illustration GRAD220 Graphic Design I GRAD230 Imaging Technology GRAD240 Graphic Design II GRAD250 Advanced Page Layout GRAD255 Freelance Design GRAD260 Internship/Capstone Experience Major Electives Liberal Arts Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 36 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 60 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 PHIL201 SOSC101 SOSC215 Composition & Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Tech. Information Literacy Survey of Mathematics Critical Thinking Human Relations Career Management Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 54 JANUARY 2010 Human Resources Specialist Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 334 Online Program 337/338/339 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements The Human Resources Specialist program contains the same key components that underpin the College's other strong business programs: a foundation in basic and career success skills, strong program knowledge and skills, and a capstone internship providing practical, real-world experience. Graduates will be prepared for entrylevel positions that include staff recruitment, compensation and benefits, payroll, evaluation, and training. Graduates of this program will also have a solid business foundation with a focus on business administration techniques, critical thinking, decision making, communication skills, and information technology skills. Students can select specialization areas in compensation and benefits or payroll administration or choose to become generalists in Human Resources. As part of this program, students study local, state, and federal employment laws and regulations and learn ethical practices and perform to these standards. Graduates of the Human Resources Specialist associate degree program will be able to: Comprehend the primary functions of human resources in organizations, and apply those functions in the decision-making process. Apply information technology skills to specific human resources' applications. Develop and begin to apply leadership skills in various settings. Understand and apply the principles of ethical behavior to the workplace. Demonstrate knowledge of economic and quantitative issues in the business environment. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. ACCT110 Accounting Principles I BUSS100 Business Principles BUSS103 Introduction to Human Resource Functions BUSS107 Introduction to Compensation & Benefits BUSS113 Law & Ethics in the Business Environment BUSS133 Employment Law BUSS261 Internship/Capstone Experience PSYC101 Psychology Major Electives Liberal Arts Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 9 33 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 60 CSCI100 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 PHIL201 SOSC101 SOSC215 Introduction to Computer Science Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Critical Thinking Human Relations Career Management Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 55 JANUARY 2010 Networking Technology Associate Degree Campus Program 383 Online Program 388/389/390 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements The associate degree in Network Technology offers students a foundation of classwork and hands-on experiences with Network Systems commonly found in business environments. Students will discover how information systems support organizational success. Networking students will then move on to discover the technologies that make up the network infrastructures that allow for successful transfer and use of mission-critical business information. Those in the Network Technology program will learn how to install, configure, secure, administer, and troubleshoot network systems. Students will also address managing users, shared resources, and various other network components like routers and switches in LANs, WANs, and wireless network environments. Graduates of the Network Technology associate degree program will be able to: Design and administer networks through installing, configuring, troubleshooting, and securing network hardware components and the network operating system software(s) implemented in the network system. Explain business fundamentals found in typical American businesses. Employ effective oral and written communication skills. Import raw data and, using technical and interpersonal skills, transform into information that allows an enterprise to make timely business decisions. Process information from various sources to perform tasks/project outcomes. Research, evaluate, recommend, and specify components/complete system relative to hardware/software needs of an enterprise. Apply logical, legal, and ethical principles in planning and implementing information systems. Indentify, install, and maintain components of an information system. Use computer technology to communicate globally and access the internet for a variety of information and business purposes. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognitive abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. TECH100 TECH130 TECH140 NETW150 NETW200 *NETW210 NETW220 NETW240 *NETW250 NETW260 Business Information Systems Principles Hardware and Operating Systems Networking Fundamentals Routing and Switching in Networked Environment Networking with Windows Operating System Networking with UNIX/LINUX Network Operating Systems Wireless Networks and WAN's Network Security and Forensic Fundamentals Network Design and Implementation Internship/Capstone 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 Total Credits: Liberal Arts Requirements COMM100 or LIBS100 COMM200 or ENGL110 CSCI100 or INSM180 ENGL101 or ENGL100 ENGL250 or ENGL230 MATH103 NSCI280 PHIL150 or PHIL201 PSYC 200 or SOSC 215 SOSC102 or SOSC101 Intro to Information Literacy and Research 3 Intro to Information Literacy and Research Communication Theory and 3 Oral Communications Oral Presentations Introduction to Computer Science 3 History and Practice of Information Systems Fundamentals of Research and Writing 3 Composition and Research Intermediate Research and Writing 3 Writing for Business and Technology Survey of Mathematics 3 Ecology 3 Introduction to Logic and 3 Reasoning for Critical Thinkers Critical Thinking Psychology for the Disciplines 3 Career Management Introduction to Sociology 3 Human Relations 30 60 Total Credits: Total Credits for Degree Plan: *This class will only be offered online. 56 JANUARY 2010 Security Technology Associate Degree Campus Program 396 Online Program 392/397/398 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements The associate degree in Security Technology offers students a foundation of classwork and hands-on experiences with business technology systems, and the security procedures and technologies used to secure those systems. Students will discover how information systems are integral to organizational success. Security students will then move on to discover the technologies that comprise network infrastructures that allow for the successful transfer and use of mission critical business information. After discovering the makeup of Technology systems, Security students will move on to experience the technologies and procedures TECH professionals use to secure business systems and assets. Students will learn how to assess businesses for risk, develop effective policies and procedures to secure systems and respond to incidents and disasters. Students will also interact with the technologies used to secure and harden servers, network operating systems, and systems in general. Graduates of the Security Technology Associate Degree program will be able to: Explain business fundamentals found in typical global businesses. Distinguish among the different components that make up typical computer networks in business environments. Describe information security, common attacks, and technologies used to secure typical business networks and data. Identify major features of commonly used network operating systems. Analyze business situations to identify potential risks to the business and its assets. Assemble effective security policies, audits, logging procedures, incident response steps, business continuation procedures, and disaster recovery plans based on business security analysis. Employ effective oral and written communication skills. Demonstrate effective problem-solving, research, and critical thinking skills. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognitive abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. TECH100 TECH130 TECH140 SECR180 SECR210 SECR220 *SECR240 SECR242 *SECR250 SECR260 Business Information Systems Principles Hardware and Operating Systems Networking Fundamentals Introduction to Network Security Microsoft Servers Firewalls and VPN's Ethical Hacking Networking Security Fundamentals Computer Forensics Internship/Capstone 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 Total Credits: Liberal Arts Requirements COMM100 or LIBS100 COMM200 or ENGL110 CSCI100 or INSM180 ENGL101 or ENGL100 ENGL250 or ENGL230 MATH103 NSCI280 PHIL150 or PHIL201 PSYC200 or SOSC 215 SOSC102 or SOSC101 Intro to Information 3 Literacy and Research Introduction to Information 3 Literacy and Research Communication Theory 3 and Oral Communications Oral Presentations Introduction to Computer Science 3 History and Practice of Information Systems Fundamentals of Research and Writing 3 Composition and Research Intermediate Research and Writing 3 Writing for Business and Technology Survey of Mathematics 3 Ecology 3 Introduction to Logic and 3 Reasoning for Critical Thinkers Critical Thinking Psychology for the Disciplines 3 Career Management Introduction to Sociology 3 Human Relations 30 60 Total Credits: Total Credits for Degree Plan: *This class will only be offered online. 57 JANUARY 2010 Interactive Media Design Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 347 Medical Administrative Assistant Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 312 Online Program 313/314/316 The Interactive Media Design program prepares students for careers involving electronic media products and focusing on marketing and design. Interactive Media Design is a field of study that integrates the elements of audio, video, still images, animation, text, and data for the delivery of interactive content either through multimedia devices or the Internet. The Interactive Media Design program will produce graduates who are prepared for entry-level positions with service bureaus, multimedia design and production companies, advertising design firms, corporate training developers, and companies specializing in electronic publication and Web design. Graduates of this program will have a solid background in interactive media design and imaging hardware and software. Through design projects and hands-on experience, they will develop a working knowledge of interactive media design and multimedia project authoring. Graduates of the Interactive Media Design associate degree program will be able to: Develop web script language. Develop multimedia scripts. Assist in multimedia production. Design web sites. Design computer-based training. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements The Medical Administrative Assistant program is designed to prepare individuals for careers as entry level medical administrative assistants for diverse health care delivery systems including private medical practices, clinics, public health departments, insurance agencies, government agencies, or out-patient departments of hospitals. The program offers a foundation in document processing, medical records, and modern medical office procedures. Graduates of the Medical Administrative Assistant associate degree program are prepared for entry-level employment in private medical practices, outpatient departments, clinics, or governmental institutions. Graduates of the Medical Administrative Program are encouraged to take the CMRS certification examination. Graduates of the Medical Administrative Assistant associate degree program will be able to: Apply coding, billing, records management and scheduling skills to administrative health care industry standards. Practice professional interpersonal relations with diverse patient/client customers, using knowledge of medical/legal and ethical issues. Perform diverse administrative responsibilities including the management and processing of information and the organization and design of communication procedures. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements GRAD100 Introduction to Design GRAD255 Freelance Design INMD100 Introduction to Web Design INMD110 Web Development I INMD115 Usability I INMD120 Raster Graphics INMD130 Vector Graphics INMD215 Interactive Design I INMD220 Web Development II INMD230 Interactive Design II INMD260 Internship/Capstone Experience Major Electives Liberal Arts Requirements 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 36 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24 60 AHLT100 AHLT111 AHLT120 AHLT125 AHLT235 AHLT236 AHLT245 AHLT250 AHLT255 OFST102 OFST261 CSCI100 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 PHIL201 SOSC101 SOSC215 Medical Terminology Introduction to Health Care Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Healthcare Reimbursement/Billing Emphasis Advanced Billing Medical Office Systems/Electronic Records Coding I Advanced Coding Document Processing & Transcription Internship Introduction to Computer Science Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Critical Thinking Human Relations Career Management 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 60 JANUARY 2010 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 PHIL201 SOSC101 SOSC215 Composition & Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Information Literacy Survey of Mathematics Critical Thinking Human Relations Career Management Liberal Arts Requirements Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 58 Medical Assisting Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 375 Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements AHLT100 Medical Terminology AHLT111 Introduction to Health Care AHLT120 Anatomy and Physiology I AHLT125 Anatomy and Physiology II AHLT130 Clinical Procedures AHLT230 Medical Laboratory AHLT235 Health Care Reimbursement/Billing Emphasis AHLT240 Pharmacology AHLT245 Medical Office Systems/Electronic Records AHLT260 Internship 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 Medical assistants are multi-skilled health professionals specifically educated to work in ambulatory settings performing administrative and clinical duties. The practice of medical assisting directly influences the public's health and well being, and requires mastery of a complex body of knowledge and specialized skills requiring both formal education and practical experience that serve as standards for entry into the profession. Special personal qualifications such as a caring nature, accuracy, dependability, conscientiousness, and professionalism are required for this helping profession. Graduates of the Medical Assisting associate degree program are prepared for entry-level employment in private medical practices, outpatient departments, clinics, or governmental institutions. Graduates of the Medical Assisting program must be able to complete all necessary external performance objectives as set forth by the American Association of Medical Assistants. In order to meet these objectives, entering students must be able to participate in classroom and laboratory activities, including keyboarding, tele-communications, taking vital signs, microscopy, vision testing, etc. Prior to enrollment, students receive the entry-level competencies to be achieved for the administrative and clinical components of the program, and the criteria for reaching the competency level. Medical Assisting students must present to the college, proof of their having completed and passed professional level CPR sponsored by a recognized agency. First Aid training will be included in course work. Graduates of the Medical Assisting associate degree program will be able to: Communicate effectively, utilizing content knowledge of medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology. Demonstrate and practice behavior consistent with the legal and ethical standards of the profession, including working efficiently and collaboratively in a team setting. Using standard safety and risk-reduction precautions, demonstrate administrative and clinical skills to the AAMA entry-level competency standards. Calculate and administer medications as directed by a licensed physician. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. 32 Liberal Arts Requirements CSCI100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology 3 3 3 3 LIBS100 Introduction to Information Literacy & Research 3 MATH103 Survey of Mathematics 3 PHIL201 Critical Thinking 3 SOSC101 Human Relations 3 SOSC215 Career Management 3 Open Electives 3 30 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 62 59 JANUARY 2010 Medical Reimbursement & Coding Associate Degree Online Program 317 Offered Online Only Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements MRC100 Medical Terminology for Coders MRC105 Anatomy & Physiology for Coders MRC115 Introduction to Coding MRC135 Diagnostic Coding: ICD-9-CM MRC145 Coding Compliance & Ethics MRCP200 Diagnostic Coding for Physician Services MRCP220 Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System Level I and Level II MRCP240 Evaluation and Management Services MRCP260 Internship and Capstone Experience MRCP280 Coding Practicum: Physician Coder MRCP289 Virtual Career: Physician Coder 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 The Medical Reimbursement and Coding (MRC) Program prepares students to sit for the national coding exams, or begin working in the coding and billing field. This unique program is formatted to specifically address, through core courses, a means to facilitate uniformity of terms, the structure and organization of the body systems, common disease processes, and common pharmacological treatments. The core courses provide students with a foundation on which they will complete the coding portion of this comprehensive program. After completing the mandatory core courses, students will have a choice of studying for Physician coding or Hospital/inpatient coding. While some coding professionals choose one type of coding based on their own interest and style, many coders are cross-credentialed and able to work in both arenas. The MRC Program prepares students with the information needed to choose one or both coding paths. Students will study and practice the skills that will help them gain national coding certification from either The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) or the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC). The comprehensive nature of the MRC Program fulfills all hourly criteria for both AHIMA and AAPC national certifying bodies. Students who successfully complete the MRC Program will be equipped to participate in the field of medical coding and reimbursement. The MRC, MRCP, MRCH courses must be scheduled in numeric order. MRC100, 105, 115 and MRCP289, MRCPH289 must be scheduled one per online session. Graduates of the Medical Reimbursement & Coding associate degree program will be able to: Demonstrate a professional-level understanding of medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology Define the professional goals, career paths, and practical strategies that will advance them in the healthcare field Become a member of a professional coding organization and participate in professional networking Make career choices based on the area(s) of coding best suited for them Create a medical practice compliance plan based on national standards, and have a thorough understanding of coding, documentation, and reimbursement ethics Assign CPT codes to medical documentation for medical services, procedures, and diagnostics Correctly assign CPT E/M codes to services, utilizing the CPT metrics, including the 1995 and 1997 CMS Documentation Guidelines Correctly assign HCPCS codes to durable medical equipment, drugs, supplies, and Medicare screening services, according to CMS guidelines Assign ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes, according to the American Hospital Association's standards and sequencing rules, for inpatient and outpatient medical services Assign ICD-9-CM Volume 3 procedure codes, according to the American Hospital Association's standards and sequencing rules, for inpatient services. Compete for the Certified Professional Coder (CPC) credential from the American Academy of Professional Coders Compete for the Certified Coding Specialist (CCS) or Certified Coding Specialist- Physician (CCS-P), credential from the American Health Information Management Association Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within the community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognitive abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. 33 Liberal Arts Requirements ENGL101 ENGL250 MATH103 SOSC102 COMM150 COMM201 PSYC101 INSM180 PHIL250 Research and Writing I Research and Writing II Survey of Mathematics Principles of Sociology Introduction to Information Literacy and Research Public Speaking & Rhetorical Persuasion Principles of Psychology History and Practice of Information Systems Practices in Analytic Reasoning & Critical Thinking 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 60 60 JANUARY 2010 Nursing Associate of Applied Science Degree (OH & VA) Associate Degree Nursing (WI) 5 semesters Campus Program 369 The mission of the Nursing Program is to provide quality nursing education in North Central Ohio, Virginia and Wisconsin and to facilitate the provision of exceptional healthcare in the regions. The Nursing Program emphasizes classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences that prepare students for both the world of work and for life-long learning. Computer aided instruction, telecommunications technology, clinical simulation and other technical learning strategies are seen as integral components of the delivery methods needed to serve the educational needs of students in the 21st century. The purpose of the Nursing Program is to prepare Nursing Program graduates to function in professional registered nursing roles. The program provides a foundation of learning which promotes integration of clinical decision making processes into the provision of nursing care for meeting the health/illness needs of patients across the life span. The three roles of the associate degree nurse (Provider of Care, Manager of Care, and Member of the Discipline of Nursing) describe nursing practice and role expectations of the entry level registered nurse. The core components of those roles, as established by the National League for Nursing (NLN, 2000) are as follows: professional behaviors, communication, assessment, clinical decision making, caring interventions, teaching and learning, collaboration, and managing care. The organizing framework provides direction for the selection and ordering of learning experiences to achieve program outcomes. Graduates of the associate degree nursing program will be able to function in the following roles: Provider of care, in a variety of settings, using the nursing process to competently create, prioritize, and construct and implement individualized plans of care, including learning needs of the client and/or significant support (s) for individuals. Manager of care by communicating effectively and coordinating care with other nurses and members of the healthcare team, using basic leadership skills. Delegation of care will provide direction and teaching needed to the assistant in assuring competent care is delivered to reach desired outcomes. Member within the discipline of nursing by contributing to the profession through role modeling, upholding high standards of practice within the ethical and legal framework of nursing, promotion and use of research in nursing care, participation in professional nursing organizations and assumption of responsibility for life-long learning and self-development. Graduates of the associate degree nursing program will be able to: Employ the Nursing Process to Implement comprehensive, culturally effective care. Demonstrate clinical competence in performance of nursing skills to provide safe nursing care. Apply evidence-based information to support clinical decisionmaking. Collaborate, communicate, coordinate, and consult with other healthcare team members, the client, and significant support person(s) in assisting the client to achieve outcomes. Practice within the ethical, legal, and regulatory frameworks of nursing, standards of professional nursing practice, and employing agencies' standards of care. Construct a framework, with a beginning set of skills, knowledge and competencies, necessary for lifelong learning. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal.* Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth.* Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities.* Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning.* Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace.* *Institutional Outcomes Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements BIOL110 BIOL120 BIOL205 BIOL210 NURS100 NURS101 NURS125 NURS201 NURS211 NURS215 NURS221 NURS222 NURS230 NURS260 ENGL100 ENGL110 ENGL230 LIBS100 MATH103 PHIL201 PSYC101 Anatomy & Physiology 1 Microbiology Applications Pathophysiology Anatomy & Physiology 2 Introduction to Nursing Nursing Fundamentals Lifespan-Development & Nursing Practice Family Child Nursing Medical/Surgical Nursing I Pharmacology for Nurses Medical/Surgical Nursing II Geriatric & Mental Health Nursing Nursing Issues, Leadership & Research Internship Composition and Research Oral Presentations Writing for Business & Technology Intro. to Information Literacy & Research Survey of Mathematics Critical Thinking Psychology 3 3 3 3 1 5 3 7 6 3 4 5 3 2 51 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 21 72 Liberal Arts Requirements: Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation: 61 JANUARY 2010 Paralegal Studies Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 380 Online Program 379/381 Restaurant & Hotel Management Associate Degree 4 semesters Campus Program 391 (Available only at Syracuse Campus) The Paralegal Studies program emphasizes practical hands-on applications and prepares students to analyze cases and to prepare legal forms and documents required in litigating law suits, prosecuting crimes, closing real estate transactions, and drafting documents used in custody, separation, and divorce proceedings. The program also emphasizes the ethical considerations for legal professionals as prescribed by the American Bar Association and the National Federation of Paralegal Associates. Graduates are prepared to obtain entry-level positions working under the supervision of an attorney in private law firms or in other related occupations in government, legal departments of banks, corporations, insurance companies, accounting firms, and real estate development or property management firms. Graduates of the Paralegal Studies associate degree program will be able to: Comprehends the duties, responsibilities, and limitations of a paralegal. Identify, interpret and apply legal ethics. Apply legal terminology correctly in legal documents. Draft a variety of legal writings, including correspondence, pleadings, instruments, and memoranda. Research the law utilizing legal reference materials, which include electronic as well as print resources. Apply information technology skills to general office and specific law office applications. Demonstrate an ability to read, analyze and interpret legal documents, case law and statutory law. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements A degree in Restaurant and Hotel Management provides a wealth of employment opportunities in hotels, motels, restaurants, and resorts or at convention facilities and tourist attractions. The Restaurant and Hotel Management program provides a foundation in business and communication skills along with specialized training in hospitality operations. Students will also gain competency in the areas of customer service, sales, and human resources management. Graduates of this program may seek entry-level management positions in the restaurant and hotel industries. Graduates of the Restaurant and Hotel Management associate degree program will be able to: Apply lodging and food service industry management principles to the performance of tasks involving facility maintenance and management, food and beverage operations, personnel practices, sanitation, security procedures, customer service, sales and marketing, and product and cost control. Analyze products, costs, and service procedures for hotel, restaurant, and food service operations to enhance profitability yet maintain quality guest relations and employee productivity. Select and operate computerized systems for restaurant and property management involving reservations, guest accounting, cost control, and facility management. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements PLEG100 Introduction to Legal Research & Ethics I PLEG110 Contract Law PLEG120 Torts and Civil Litigation PLEG130 Criminal Law & Procedures PLEG140 Law Office Management PLEG190 Real Property PLEG200 Legal Research II PLEG210 Domestic Relations Law PLEG260 Internship/Capstone Experience Major Elective Liberal Arts Requirements JANUARY 2010 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 60 ACCT110 HOTT101 HOTT111 HOTT211 HOTT221 HOTT226 HOTT231 HOTT241 HOTT251 HOTT260 Accounting Principles I Introduction to Hospitality Food and Beverage Service Computerized Hotel Systems Hotel Front Desk Operations Menu Planning & Nutrition Convention Sales & Service Food and Beverage Management Housekeeping & Security Internship/Capstone Experience 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 Optional Course HOTT121 HOTT122 Cooperative Experience or Disney Experience 12 9 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 60 Liberal Arts Requirements CSCI100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy & Research MATH103 Survey of Mathematics PHIL201 Critical Thinking SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC215 Career Management Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation CSCI100 Introduction to Computer Science ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy & Research MATH103 Survey of Mathematics PHIL201 Critical Thinking SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC215 Career Management Open Electives 62 Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation Travel & Tourism Management Associate Degree 4 semesters Program 385 (Available only at Syracuse Campus) Bryant & Stratton College's Travel and Tourism Management program provides students with a basic background in business skills along with specialized training for the exciting travel industry so that students qualify for more than one area of employment. As a graduate of this program, students may seek positions as a reservationists, tour planners, airline ground service personnel, business travel planners, hotel sales representatives, or agency management trainees. Graduates of the Travel and Tourism Management associate degree program will be able to: Use industry resources to select, collect, and manipulate data from computer-based and manual reservations systems. Perform clerical responsibilities such as keyboarding, record keeping, office communication, scheduling, and mail distribution and communicate effectively with producers/suppliers of travel products. Aid in the creation of promotional and presentation materials. Employ information literacy skills through the effective use of technology and information resources to accomplish a goal. Pursue new learning opportunities within their community and career for personal and professional growth. Develop thinking processes and utilize learning strategies to understand their metacognative abilities. Transfer knowledge from life lessons and formal instruction to new situations as evidence of relational learning. Demonstrate proficient mathematic and communication (written and oral) skills as required in the workplace. Semester Credit Hour Major Requirements HOTT100 HOTT110 HOTT120 HOTT130 HOTT140 HOTT210 HOTT220 HOTT221 HOTT230 HOTT231 HOTT261 Introduction to Tourism Destination Geography I Destination Geography II Destination Geography III Destination Geography IV Travel Computing & Ticketing I Travel Computing & Ticketing II Hotel Front Desk Operations Travel Sales & Marketing Convention Sales & Service Internship/Capstone Experience 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 27 60 JANUARY 2010 Liberal Arts Requirements ENGL100 Composition and Research ENGL110 Oral Presentations ENGL230 Writing for Business & Technology LIBS100 Intro. to Information Literacy & Research MATH103 Survey of Mathematics PHIL201 Critical Thinking SOSC101 Human Relations SOSC215 Career Management Open Electives Total Credit Hours Required for Graduation 63 64 JANUARY 2010 Bryant & Stratton College Course Descriptions COURSE DESCRIPTIONS The course numbering system consists of four letters and three numbers for each course. The letters indicate the following subject areas: Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ACCT Allied Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .AHLT Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BIOL Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BUSS College Success . . . . . . . . . .MISC PREFIXES Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .COMM Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CSCI Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CRJU Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ECON English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENGL Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ELET Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FINA Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GRAD Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .HTHS Human Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .HURS History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .HIST Hospitality & Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .HOTT Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .HUMA Information Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .INFT Interactive Media Design . . . . . . . . . .INMD Introduction to Information Literacy & Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .LIBS Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MATH Medical Insurance Billing & . . . . . . . . .MIBC Coding Medical Reimbursement . . . . . . . . . . . .MRC & Coding Natural Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NSCI Network Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NETW Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NURS Office Technology/ Administrative Assisting . . . . . . . . . . . .OFST Paralegal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PLEG Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PHYS Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PHIL Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PSYC Security Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SECR Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOSC Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TECH Virtual Office Information . . . . . . . . . . .VOIM Management COURSE CATALOG DESCRIPTIONS Accounting (ACCT) ACCT110 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I advanced focus upon financial statements, cash, and temporary investments. Preparation and interpretation of the cash flow statement relative to the decision making process is also addressed. Prerequisite: ACCT120 ACCT230 COST ACCOUNTING 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to accounting concepts, principles, and practices is provided. The focus is upon the accounting cycle, the recording process, financial statement preparation, payroll and cash control. ACCT120 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II 3 Semester Credit Hours Accounting concepts, principles and practices are continued. This course includes specific inventory methods, receivables and payables, bad debt, and valuation of plant and equipment. An overview of basic partnership and corporate transactions, cash flows, and cost principles is provided. Prerequisite: ACCT110 ACCT130 TAX ACCOUNTING 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of job order and process cost accounting systems is provided. Cost applications for manufacturing, materials, labor, factory overhead, departmental costs, direct and absorption costing methods, and a more in-depth study of break-even and costvolumeprofit analysis are covered. An overview of activity based costing (ABC) is also included. Prerequisite: ACCT120 ACCT240 ACCOUNTING CASES AND ETHICS 3 Semester Credit Hours The theory and practice of federal income taxes for preparation of individual returns and basic business returns are covered. IRS structure, federal tax forms and schedules, and computerized tax packages are also included. Prerequisite: ACCT110 ACCT210 ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will review topics covered on the ACAT exam. In addition, a real world application case will require adjustments, corrections, and reclassifications of records in order to demonstrate competencies in the overall accounting process. A discussion of ethics will be integrated into topic areas. Prerequisites: ACCT210 & ACCT220 ACCT260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will explore concepts and applications of accounting through the use of integrated technology. Prerequisite: ACCT120 ACCT215 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is an advanced study of financial statements, cash, temporary investments, and inventory valuations. Emphasis is placed on calculations and analysis of information to prepare journal entries, financial statements and bank reconciliations. Prerequisite: ACCT120 ACCT220 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS Allied Health (AHLT) AHLT100 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY JANUARY 2010 Note: All major required courses are offered during each calendar year; however, not every course is offered every semester. Look for Online course listings each semester on our web page www.bryantstratton.edu. 66 3 Semester Credit Hours Fundamental concepts of financial analysis and planning are covered. Students will apply ratio analysis and techniques to determine strengths and weaknesses of an organization. Capital budgeting, debt and equity fund raising, and forecasting based on budgets and cash projections are included with more 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to constructing, spelling, and correctly using medical terminology is provided. The language of medicine is studied through an investigation of the structure and formation of medical terms. Focus is on an overview of anatomy utilizing the systems approach. Resource material, such as a medical dictionary and PDR are used. AHLT111 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE 3 Semester Credit Hours Principles governing the release of information and confidentiality of patient information are discussed. Topics to be covered include: laws, regulations, ethics, standards affecting the management of health information, and principles of liability. An overview of health care delivery systems and the roles of health care professionals are also discussed. AHLT120 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I AHLT236 ADVANCED BILLING AHLT260 INTERNSHIP 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of basic molecular and cellular functions, as well as the structure, functions and basic disease processes of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, digestive, and cardiovascular systems. Prerequisite: AHLT100 Corequisite: AHLT130 AHLT125 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II 3 Semester Credit Hours Evaluation of documentation and abstract records to assign diagnostic and procedural codes for in-patient and out-patient billing are covered in depth. Prerequisite: AHLT100, AHLT235 Corequisite: AHLT255 AHLT240 PHARMACOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of basic molecular and cellular functions, as well as the structure, functions and basic disease processes of the nervous, immune and lymphatic, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: AHLT100 Corequisite: AHLT230 AHLT130 CLINICAL PROCEDURES 3 Semester Credit Hours The basic concepts of clinical pharmacology are examined. Drug legislation and the laws governing dispensing of drugs are studied. The mathematics of dosages, metric conversions, and the classification of drugs to include usual dosages, indications, side effects, and contraindications are discussed. Prerequisites: AHLT100 & MATH103 AHLT 245 MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES/ ELECTRONIC RECORDS 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college is provided. In accordance with AAMA regulations, students may not receive compensation from the internship site. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 160 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisite: SOSC215 Final Semester All AHLT and MIBC Courses must be completed prior to scheduling AHLT 260 per AAMA. Biology (BIOL) BIOL110 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I 4 Semester Credit Hours Students gain skills in clinical office procedures. Instruction includes fundamentals of assisting with patient examination/positioning and nutritional education, sanitation / disinfection/ autoclaving procedures, vital signs, specialty exams, electrocardiograph, minor surgical procedures, and medical office emergencies. Prerequisite: AHLT100 Corequisite: AHLT120 AHLT230 MEDICAL LABORATORY 3 Semester Credit Hours Administrative and management skills are developed for the medical office including daily operations, managing medical records, practice finances, quality improvement, risk management, and human resource management. Prerequisite: AHLT100, OFST100 AHLT250 CODING I 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of chemical and cellular functions, as well as the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, digestive, and cardiovascular systems. BIOL120 MICROBIOLOGY APPLICATIONS 4 Semester Credit Hours This course focuses on theory of laboratory testing and practical application of selected testing in the disciplines of hematology, chemistry, urinalysis, immunology/serology, and microbiology. Blood collection techniques are included. Prerequisite: AHLT100 Corequisite: AHLT125 AHLT235 HEALTH CARE REIMBURSEMENT/ BILLING EMPHASIS 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the purpose and use of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) classification system. Topics include coding conventions, coding principles, and CMS official coding guidelines (inpatient and outpatient). Students will be required to assign ICD-9-CM codes to diagnosis/ procedure statements, case abstracts, and patient records. Use of the ICD-9-CM coding manual and a computerized encoder is incorporated; inpatient, outpatient, and physician office reimbursement systems are discussed. Prerequisite: AHLT100, OFST100 Corequisite: AHLT235 AHLT255 ADVANCED CODING II 3 Semester Credit Hours An overview of concepts of microbiology to provide a basic understanding of the concepts of microbiology. Emphasis is on bacteriology and virology, concepts of immunology, epidemiology, and interpretation of common laboratory tests to form a basis for practical, patient-focused knowledge for application in providing nursing care. Prerequisite: BIOL110 BIOL205 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours Study of the disease processes of the hematological, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and urologic, gastrointestinal, neurological, musculoskeletal, endocrine, reproductive, and integumentary systems. Prerequisites: BIOL110, MATH103 JANUARY 2010 BIOL210 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II 3 Semester Credit Hours Reimbursement methods and proper coding procedures for various insurance and managed care plans are covered. Eligibility requirements, processing, collection, and computerized patient accounting procedures are emphasized. Prerequisite: AHLT100, OFST100 Corequisite: AHLT250 (MAA only) 3 Semester Credit Hours Study and practice of the principles of Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) classification systems. Prerequisite: AHLT100, AHLT250 Corequisite: AHLT236 3 Semester Credit Hours Builds on the fundamentals studied in Anatomy and Physiology I by exploring the more intricate systems of the body. Emphasis is placed on the normal functions of respiration, circulation, digestion, metabolism, excretion and reproduction. Prerequisite: BIOL110 67 Business (BUSS) BUSS100 BUSINESS PRINCIPLES BUSS113 LAW & ETHICS IN THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT BUSS207 PAYROLL RECORDS & PROCEDURES 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a survey of the organizational and fundamental operations of business enterprises and the concepts of the American economic system. Management, marketing, economics, and finance principles are explored to give insights into business in the global economy. BUSS103 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RESOURCE FUNCTIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will study how the law sets behavior standards and a system for compliance with those standards. Students will also be introduced to the concept of ethics, a system of moral values, which addresses what one should do regardless of what the law requires that one must do. Students will explore both the legal and ethical principles involved through the use of case studies. BUSS120 SALES PRINCIPLES 3 Semester Credit Hours This is a study of payroll and personnel records, procedures and regulations. The course will include a study of the various state and federal laws pertaining to the computation of earnings and withholdings. Payroll tax payment requirements and preparation of the employer's state and federal payroll tax reports will be included. Prerequisite: ACCT110 BUSS208 EMPLOYEE TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will be introduced to the tasks and duties performed in both large and small organizations' human resource functional areas. The six major human resource functions that will be considered are: human resource planning, recruitment, and selection, human resource development, compensation and benefits, safety and health, employee and labor relations, and human resource research. BUSS104 EMPLOYEE/LABOR RELATIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students explore the principal phases of the sales processes, including prospecting, presentation, demonstration, resistance, and closing. Sales ethics, behavior patterns, customer service, competition, product analysis, and sales promotion are discussed. Sales presentations are part of the course. BUSS130 BUSINESS LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will be exposed to current issues, concepts and processes for employee development and training facing today's dynamic organization. Students will use a hands-on approach to assess organizational needs for employee development and then design and evaluate a plan for employee development and training. BUSS215 MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES 3 Semester Credit Hours Development, structure, and processes of labor relations are discussed in this course. The history and development of labor relations, the structure of union organizations, union organizing and union avoidance, bargaining issues, and the process of negotiations and contract administration are defined and discussed in this course. This course will also address employee relations in nonunion organizations including examples of both cooperative and adversarial relationships. Discussions will also discuss the effects of globalization on employment and labor relations. BUSS107 INTRODUCTION TO COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides an introduction to the study of law, courts, and court procedures. Emphasis is placed on contracts, sales, titles, and product warranties and liabilities from a consumer and business standpoint. Students explore legal principles through the use of exercises and cases. BUSS133 EMPLOYMENT LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours A survey of the functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. Special emphasis is placed on strategic planning, forecasting, and business ethics. Students research management theories and applications. Management cases are analyzed and discussed. BUSS217 RECRUITING, SELECTION, AND STAFFING 3 Semester Credit Hours This course offers an introduction to the systems, methods and procedures involved in the administration and oversight of compensation and benefits within organizations. BUSS110 MARKETING PRINCIPLES 3 Semester Credit Hours This course uses a "life cycle" approach in order to introduce the student to the legal issues that exist in the context of human resources management. Students will trace the employment cycle and address issues related to hiring, recruitment, and background checks. The course will also explore issues that arise during the tenure of employment including harassment, discrimination, privacy, benefits and compensation, performance appraisal and termination, and workplace safety. Current events and legal cases are used to illustrate important concepts with questions designed to prompt the student to think critically about the issues involved from an employer's viewpoint. BUSS204 EMPLOYEE RELATIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course, students will be introduced to the processes of recruiting, selecting, and staffing of human resources for organizations. Students will learn about the theories, practices, and research and legal foundations that inform staffing and personnel decisions within an organization. Prerequisite: BUSS103 BUSS222 RETAIL MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours An introductory course covering marketing terms and concepts. The marketing environment, the buyer decision process, segmentation, targeting, positioning, the marketing mix, marketing in the non-profit sector, and the selling process are examined. Special emphasis is also given to the role of research/demographics. Prerequisite: BUSS100 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours An overview of the dynamic field of retailing will be provided; students will study essential retail management concepts, including consumer behavior, sales, marketing, and service. Prerequisite: BUSS100 BUSS225 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course, students will enhance their understanding of employment law through examination of the basic elements of successful employee relations programs within the broad field of human resources management. Prerequisite: BUSS133 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of personnel administration including coverage of recruitment selection, training, evaluation, disciplinary action, compensation, and benefits. Employment laws and regulations are also discussed. 68 BUSS227 PAYROLL ADMINISTRATION BUSS320 MARKETING MANAGEMENT BUSS420 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of payroll administration including payroll accounting, reporting requirements, recordkeeping and other payroll department issues. BUSS250 THEORIES OF E-COMMERCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Development and implementation of a marketing program that addresses the issues of target markets, sales, advertising, channels, pricing and forecasting. Prerequisite: BUSS110 BUSS325 GLOBAL MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is designed to guide students through a complete project, from initial planning, obtaining resources, establishing priorities, meeting deadlines, and conducting project-related meetings, to evaluating progress, revising plans, and bringing the project to a successful conclusion. BUSS430 MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to the theories of creating retail stores on the Internet including identifying a product to sell, finding customers, advertising, setting up the Internet-based store, constructing a warehouse, and establishing a credit payment and delivery system. BUSS260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: Taken in term student earns 60th credit hour BUSS300 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours Utilizing globalization as a focus, this course provides the opportunity for students to explore and examine the cross-cultural and international environmental influences on an organization's marketing, financial and managerial operations. Special emphasis is placed upon a global mindset including adapting organizational structures to a constantly changing marketplace and transcending language and behavior barriers. Prerequisite: BUSS100 BUSS340 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours An examination of marketing and advertising approaches and how they influence decisionmakers. The course examines different media approaches and the development of marketing brochures, displays and web pages. BUSS450 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours A survey of operations management techniques and procedures, this course topic includes TQM, aggregate planning and budgeting, projecting operational time lines and continuous improvement. Emphasis is placed upon strategic considerations and profit maximization. Prerequisite: MATH290, MATH309 BUSS405 SMALL BUSINESS FINANCE 3 Semester Credit Hours As a senior capstone course, students integrate and apply Business curriculum concepts. A detailed strategic plan is developed consisting of the goals, action steps and budget which are aligned with an organization's mission. Students test various aspects of the plan and evaluate results. Prerequisites: Final Semester or Dean's Permission BUSS460 PRACTICUM AND CAPSTONE PROJECT 3 Semester Credit Hours An overview of business planning, operations, and law with an emphasis on organizational management, behavior, and ethics. BUSS305 ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 Semester Credit Hours The course focuses on how to start a business. It examines the personal traits of an entrepreneur, the advantages and disadvantages of owning a business, new start-ups, and franchising. BUSS310 MARKETING AND SALES 3 Semester Credit Hours The course examines the various financial issues that a small business owner/manager may encounter. Topics to be covered are financial resources, owner liabilities, financial systems, tax issues, risk management and pension planning. Prerequisite: ACCT220 BUSS410 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT BUSS315 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR AND SELLING 3 Semester Credit Hours The course will examine various theories of consumer behavior and how they relate to the selling process. It will examine the various theories of selling and how they relate to consumer behavior. Prerequisite: BUSS110 69 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours The principles of marketing and selling are discussed. Students study the consumer decision-making process, targeting, segmentation, positioning, prospecting, and follow-up techniques. 3 Semester Credit Hours Students learn basic principles supporting the creation of a Strategic Performance Based Management system. They will then develop specific behavioral skills associated with the high performance workplace. Utilizing the methodology of interactive small group problem solving sessions, coaching, performance appraisal, evaluation and termination skills will be modeled. Organizational culture topics in diversity, discrimination, labor relations that impact individual performance will be discussed and simulated through case studies and group discussion. Prerequisite: BUSS215 or HTHS301 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will design, execute and present the outcomes of a capstone project conducted during a practicum field experience. Students will be challenged to use their knowledge, skills and behaviors developed over the course of their program studies to solve real-world problems in their career discipline. Students will be evaluated from both academic and professional standards. The capstone project will be a portfolio development exhibit. Prerequisites: Final Semester or Dean's Permission College Success (Misc Prefixes) ENGL099 PRE-COLLEGE ENGLISH 3 Semester Credit Hour Equivalents Students review and practice the rules of grammar, punctuation, and essay development and develop their writing strategies through individual and group involvement. Students demonstrate a need for this course through a diagnostic evaluation. Satisfactory completion of this course qualifies students for enrollment in ENGL100 Composition and Research. FYEX098 FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE The First Year Experience (FYE) is a required and graded group advising seminar focusing on the academic, career and lifetime success for students. Modules are delivered over the 15 week period to support the academic progress and social transition that is vital to the college experience. MATH097 PRE-COLLEGE MATHEMATICS with critical analyses of written and presented speech to include a composition/rhetoric/textual element from the English discipline. Prerequisite: ENGL100 or ENGL101 CRJU102 POLICING Computer Science (CSCI) CSCI100 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hour Equivalents Students refresh their knowledge of the basic principles of arithmetic and algebra. Fundamental operations and problem solving are developed through exercises and drills. Students demonstrate a need for this course through a diagnostic evaluation. Satisfactory completion of this course qualifies the student for enrollment in more advanced mathematics courses. 3 Semester Credit Hours This introductory course exposes students to the theoretical basis of computing science. Students study the social, educational and career implications of computer hardware and system software, as well as emerging technologies. Learners will apply technology to develop proficiency in the productions, analysis and archiving of electronic communications common in today's society. INSM180 HISTORY AND PRACTICE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours Focusing on the functions of contemporary law enforcement agencies, this course provides a comprehensive overview of law enforcement's role in the criminal justice system. Topics include: history, important roles and functions, community policing, patrol, administration, organization, accountability, gangs, ethics, civil liability, trends in contemporary policing, police subculture, and terrorism. CRJU105 CORRECTIONS Communication (COMM) COMM100 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION LITERACY AND RESEARCH 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will study the evolution of information and the impact of technology on research. Students will learn how to access, evaluate, and synthesize acquired research. The research process and papers include a history of the careers along with the assignments on how changes in technology have impacted the communication processes in the career field. COMM 150 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION LITERACY AND RESEARCH 3 Semester Credit Hours This introductory course exposes students to the theoretical basis of computing science. Students study the social, educational and career implications of computer hardware and system software, as well as emerging technologies. Learners will apply technology to develop proficiency in the productions, analysis and archiving of electronic communications common in today's society. 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a survey on the contemporary American Corrections system and an overview of the field of corrections. Focus will be on courts, detention, sentencing, adult institutions, probation, parole, staffing, and personnel issues. Attention will also be given to the theory and practice of correctional institutions and their functions; the prison as a total institution; characteristics of various types of correctional facilities; problems of correctional methods; analysis of the prison community; adjustment to prison life; impact of institutionalization; corrections in the community and historical development. CRJU110 CRIMINAL COURTS Criminal Justice (CRJU) CRJU100 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will study the evolution of information and the impact of technology on research. Students will learn how to access, evaluate, and synthesize acquired research. The research process and papers include a history of the careers along with the assignments on how changes in technology have impacted the communication processes in the career field. COMM200 COMMUNICATION THEORY AND ORAL COMMUNICATION 3 Semester Credit Hours This course lays the foundation for a solid understanding of the components, processes, and functions of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include: history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system; relationship of the criminal justice system to the three branches of government; trials; sentencing; victims; the corrections system; the impact of substance abuse on crime; the use of technology to solve crimes; and the impact of multicultural and international crime. CRJU101 CRIMINOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours By illustrating the important work of judges, juries, prosecutors, and defense attorneys, this course offers a practical overview of the United States criminal court system. Topics include: processing of offenders, arrest, charging, and booking, the trial process, sentencing, the appeal process, and other important issues. Prerequisite: CRJU100 CRJU120 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is a multi-disciplinary course with the infusion of communication theory along with critical analyses of written and presented speech to include a composition/rhetoric/textual element from the English discipline. COMM 201 PUBLIC SPEAKING & RHETORICAL PERSUASION 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides an overall introduction to the principles and theory of criminology. The student will learn the processes involved in identifying and recognizing the causes and patterns of criminal behavior. The course presents the standard approaches to criminology, and the research methods used in this field. Additional topics include the biological, psychological, social, or psychiatric roots of crime. 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will review probation, parole, and community corrections. Students will learn about their histories and organizational structures, the nature and effects of the process by which offenders are handled, and the dynamics and trends toward change in the fields of probation, parole, and communitybased corrections. Prerequisite: CRJU105 CRJU130 INTERVIEWING THEORIES AND PRACTICES 70 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is a multi-disciplinary course with the infusion of communication theory along 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a practical interviewing guide for persons who work in the Criminal Justice system. Specific topics include: Interview preparation, nonverbal communication, types of interviewees, multicultural interviewing, the basic skills model for interviewing, communication of empathy, use of speed and pacing, and immediacy, concreteness, confrontation and assertion skills. Prerequisite: CRJU100 CRJU150 JUVENILE JUSTICE CRJU220 POLICE MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours This thorough overview of the juvenile justice system includes: an introduction to juvenile justice, delinquency theories, categories of offenders, intake, adjudication and processing, treatment, emerging trends, and juvenile correction alternatives. CRJU200 CRIMINAL LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours Beginning with the historical evolution of criminal law, this course discusses the nature of criminal offenses against persons, property, and the public. The course also analyzes the types of criminal defenses, legal and social dimensions of crimes, and an indepth view of offenses against public order and public morality. Topics include the purpose, nature and history of law, characteristics of the adversarial system, the elements of crime, and criminal defenses such as justifications, excuses, and insanity. CRJU100 CRJU210 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 3 Semester Credit Hours This course focuses on the history of policing, police culture, basic organizational concepts of law enforcement agencies, operational considerations and managing of the police organization. Specific topics include: management styles and principles, characteristics of police culture, the purposes of police organizations, operating principles, the art of proactive police leadership, communication management, police technology, patrol operations and community policing, non-management functions, administrative functions, fiscal policies, collective bargaining, and training. Prerequisite: CRJU102 CRJU222 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE CRJU300 ETHICAL DILEMMAS AND CHALLENGES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 Semester Credit Hours This course in criminal investigation is geared toward the practical application of investigative tools, concepts, and protocols. Students are introduced to the history, concepts, methods, and processes of standard criminal investigation. Topics covered in the course include: history of criminal investigation, basic concepts, methods of investigation, collecting evidence, interrogating witnesses and suspects, laboratory and technical services, ethical considerations, conducting the search of a crime scene, reporting, and effective methods of surveillance. Prerequisite:CRJU100 CRJU215 CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 3 Semester Credit Hours This course focuses on the constitutional rights of criminal defendants as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court. Students discuss Supreme Court decisions. Students will learn to distinguish between due process and crime control perspectives, including the impact on criminal procedure. Violation of constitutional rights will be examined, as well the civil, criminal, and non-judicial remedies that are available. This includes a study of the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth amendments. Students will also analyze the entirety of criminal procedure from first contact to appeals, as well as the roles of prosecutors, grand juries, and defense attorneys. Prerequisite: CRJU110 CRJU225 SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 3 Semester Credit Hours This course looks at the ethical dilemmas and professional problems faced by criminal justice personnel. Students will discuss the practical applicability of ethical ideals and organizational codes and standards. Students will study key concepts related to ethics and the impact of ethical decisions. This will include investigation of the relationship between values, morals, ethics, and critical thinking. Different philosophies related to ethics will be examined, and students will apply these theories through an analysis of the various processes associated with making ethical decisions. Finally, students will examine the specific nature of ethics in the criminal justice system and will evaluate methods used to address ethical misconduct in society. CRJU310 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3 Semester Credit Hours A theoretical look at juvenile delinquency will be covered in detail during this course. The causes of juvenile delinquency will be examined at length. There will be a strong sociological focus on the root causes of delinquency and the theme followed across the life course. The information gathered helps learners understand how delinquent behavior originates. The course follows if it either continues and evolves into adult criminality or terminates. There will be an emphasis on the important roles that gender, race, social class and place of residence play in the formative adolescent years. CRJU320 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides students an overview of the management and administration of correctional agencies. Included topics are the link of theory and management, leadership, strategic management, implementing correctional goals, managing offender risk, staff organization and functions, controlling violent inmates, creating a safe and secure prison environment, supervising employees, human resource management, and controlling correctional costs. Students will have the opportunity to compare general public management challenges to the growing correctional populations. Prerequisite: CRJU105 3 Semester Credit Hours This course explores current critical issues concerning the efficient and effective delivery of security services. In particular, it focuses on three key areas: the administration of security by the public and private sectors and the need for greater cooperation between the two; the policies for the administration of security as set forth in the myriad of new and revised domestic security laws, especially the USA Patriot Act; and the need for security administrators to use technology to protect critical assets.. CRJU260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: Taken in term student earns 60th credit hour CRJU330 VICTIMOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours This course examines the causes of victimization and looks at theories associated with violent victimization. It analyzes the offender-victim relationship and presents ideas on preventing violence and responding to victimization. Students will study the terminology related to violence and 71 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will examine knowledge gained regarding the "crime problem" and delve into the many levels of events that influence a person's life course-from the individual to the individual's family, peers, schools, neighborhoods, community, culture and society as a whole. Reviews of contemporary research, theory and practice concerning the psychology of crime will be presented. Descriptions of the behavioral, emotional, and cognitive aspects of crime are examined from the perspectives of the victim and offender. The causes, classification, prediction, prevention, intervention and treatment of delinquency and criminal behavior are also examined. Prerequisite: CRJU101 victimization, as well as the concept of victimization. This will include tracing the development of theories of victimization and differentiation between types of violence. Students will examine offender-victim relationships and analyze injustices in the criminal justice system. Motives for terrorism will be examined, as well as an assessment of laws to combat terrorism. Finally, students will appraise ways to respond to criminal victimization. Prerequisite: CRJU101 CRJU331 CYBER CRIME for police executives and discussions of courtroom civility and violence. Additional aspects of the justice systems such as inappropriate prison staff-inmate relationships, administering the death penalty, probation-police partnerships, computer crime and probation, workplace loyalty, drug courts and new technologies. Ethical considerations will be explored regarding the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJU100 CRJU400 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE Economics (ECON) ECON220 MACROECONOMICS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course alerts society and the criminal justice system to the expanding high-tech crime primarily though the use of computers. Explored are the high-tech crimes and techniques used by criminals. The tools and methods used by both criminals and investigators are explained. High tech crime has opened a new career field in various levels of the justice system. CRJU333 WHITE COLLAR CRIME 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a global view of criminal justice by using different countries to demonstrate their legal systems. Comparative criminology and comparative criminal justice are distinguished. Four contemporary legal traditions are identified and their basic features are presented. Prerequisite: CRJU100 CRJU422 FAMILY VIOLENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will introduce the students to issues in macro theory through the use of models, principles and econometric analysis. Topics will include: opportunity costs, supply and demand, market equilibrium, and the assessment of GNP/GDP. Discussions will focus on the impact of business cycles, the role of government in the economy, the financial system, the role of monetary policy and the major issues facing the U.S. economy. ECON325 MICROECONOMICS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides an expanded definition of white collar crime and the victims impacted by deceitful acts. The list of this type of crime has been expanded to include conspiracy, fraud, and insider training. Corporation, notfor profit and educational leaders are now being held accountable for actions which result in a loss of money or present false results to all stakeholders. This course will delineate environmental crimes, hazardous workplaces, medical malfeasance, and unsafe products as items to add to the criminal list. In addition, there will be discussions of many other categories of white-collar crime are covered such as: embezzlement, securities fraud, political corruption and computer scams. CRJU335 DRUGS AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 Semester Credit Hours This course covers research from a sociolegal perspective with a leaning toward the criminal justice perspective. Legislation enacted is cited and the impact on improving the consequences explained. The definition of victims and offenders are expanded to include the elderly, disabled, children, males and females, heterosexuals and homosexuals, and all forms of family violence is discussed. The crimes of domestic violence are identified and the consequences understood through research. CRJU423 TERRORISM AND HOMELAND SECURITY 3 Semester Credit Hours This social science course, based upon the "allocation of scarce resources," examines basic economic assumptions and models. Though the economic functions of government and aggregate concepts are addressed, the course primarily has a microeconomic focus. Opportunity costs, supply and demand, market equilibrium and the GNP/GDP are covered. The impact of business cycles, economic policies, deregulation, environ-mental protection and labor on both the market and the individual organization is also highlighted. Electronics (ELET) ELET100 CIRCUITS I 4 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to the principles of DC electronics and magnetism and their applications. Corequisites: ELET101 & MATH103 ELET101 CIRCUITS I LAB JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours Determining who is impacted by drug use, misuse and abuse and how it has expanded in our society. This course emphasizes the sociological aspects of drug-taking behavior and the relationship between drugs and crime. The criminal justice system's impact on the growth of drug use in America is discussed. How legal and illegal drugs affect the mind and the body is examined. The basic facts and major issues concerning drug taking behavior is presented in a straight forward comprehensive way. CRJU343 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION 3 Semester Credit Hours This course reviews the history of terrorism and its origins, its rapid evolution in the present and future. Terrorist events left and right wing are examined in various countries and regions. Discussions are presented about efforts of nations around the world to deter or discover terrorism and to find other ways to deal with the threats. Prerequisite: CRJU100 CRJU460 PRACTICUM/CAPSTONE PROJECT 2 Semester Credit Hours Competencies are developed in practical applications of the principles and theories presented in ELET100 Circuits I. Corequisites: ELET100 & MATH103 ELET120 CIRCUITS II 72 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will describe justice administration in a dynamic and changing world where society is adapting for future challenges. Criminal justice administration and career opportunities are addressed. A review of the "Ten Commandments" 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will design, execute and present the outcomes of a capstone project conducted during a practicum field experience. Students will be challenged to use their knowledge, skills and behaviors developed over the course of their program studies to solve real-world challenges or opportunity in their career discipline. Students will be evaluated from both academic and professional standards. The capstone project will be a portfolio development exhibit. Prerequisites: Final Semester or Dean's Permission 4 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to the principles of AC electronics, reactive circuits, and filters and their applications. Semiconductor devices are introduced. Prerequisites: ELET100 & ELET101 Corequisite: MATH112 ELET150 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 4 Semester Credit Hours The fundamentals of digital logic are presented. Students study various numbering systems, logic gates, and families; Boolean expressions; flip-flops; registers and counters; adders and subtractors; encoders and decoders; multiplexers and demultiplexers; tristate; logic symbols; and microprocessor architecture. Prerequisites: ELET100, ELET101 , MATH 103 ELET151 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LAB ELET250 PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS 2 Semester Credit Hours Competencies are developed in practical applications presented in Digital Electronics. Experiments include digital gates, combinational logic, flip-flops, mathematical logic devices, shift registers, decoders, encoders, multiplexing, and tri-state logic. Prerequisites: ELET100, ELET101, MATH103 Corequisite: ELET150 ELET200 ANALOG ELECTRONICS 3 Semester Credit Hours The principles and applications of programmable logic controllers are explored at the hardware and software level. The concepts of ladder logic are introduced. Prerequisite: ELET230 ELET260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE ELET420 CONTROL CIRCUIT STABILITY AND MODELING 4 Semester Credit Hours Circuit elements used in the conversion of signals are discussed. Students study operation and applications of transistors, multilayer devices, and small scale integrated circuits. Prerequisite: ELET120 Corequisite: ELET201 ELET201 ANALOG ELECTRONICS LAB 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the College. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester ELET325 ADVANCED ANALOG & DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 3 Semester Credit Hours Emphasis on the concepts of stability in feedback control systems utilizing case studies and MATLAB tools. MATLAB tools are used to study time-domain characteristics of first and second order feedback control systems. Stability phenomenon, Bode plots and the Nyquist method are related to modern industrial applications. Prerequisite: MATH401 ELET430 EMBEDDED INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours A concentrated study of Embedded systems, typical microcontroller architecture, addressing modes and programming code, and the basics of data structures and C++ programming language. Through Evaluation Board Hardware, the concepts of Interrupts, Timer and I/O interface are explored. Prerequisites: ELET350 & ELET410 ELET440 POWER ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS 2 Semester Credit Hours Competencies are developed in practical applications of the principles and theories presented in Analog Electronics. Prerequisite: ELET120 Corequisite: ELET200 ELET210 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students study devices unique to the field of industrial electronics. Topics to include AC/DC machines and robotics. ELET220 COMMUNICATION I 3 Semester Credit Hours A review of basic terminology and concepts in electronics including passive components, diodes and transistors, applications of Op Amp and Voltage Regulator circuits. Using simulation software, students evaluate various RLC and Op Amp circuits. A comprehensive overview of digital circuitry is modeled by numerous examples utilizing MultisimTM software. Prerequisites: ET150 & ET200 or Equivalent ELET350 INTRODUCTION TO PDL APPLICATION 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to DC and AC energy concepts, single phase and three phase AC power transfer, power switching device technologies, common topologies in single and three phase rectification and associated waveforms. Prerequisite: ELET410 ELET450 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS & SENIOR PROJECT 3 Semester Credit Hours Students apply their knowledge of electronic components and circuits into a study of basic communication systems. Prerequisite: ELET120 Corequisites: ELET200 & ET201 ELET230 MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL 3 Semester Credit Hours A review of Boolean Algebra and functional blocks in digital electronics including common combinational and sequential logic circuits. PLDs and MAX+PLUSIITM software for building various digital architectures are introduced. Students engage in numerous exercises in understanding the characteristics and applications of PLDs and various digital circuits through both graphical and text methods available in PLD software. Prerequisite: ELET325 ELET410 ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION AND INTERFACE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students use research and development concepts to produce a comprehensive senior project utilizing theory and practices learned throughout program. Prerequisite: ELET410 Corequisite: ELET420 English (ENGL) ENGL100 COMPOSITION AND RESEARCH ELET240 COMMUNICATION II 4 Semester Credit Hours A study of television, antennas, wave guides and transmission lines, basic microwave communication, digital communication, and fiber optics. Prerequisite: ELET220 3 Semester Credit Hours Emphasis is placed on real life applications of electronic technology in the measurement and instrumentation industries. An introduction to common sensing and measurement devices and analog signal conditioning circuits that amplify or filter the signals, A-D and D-A conversion circuitry, as well as common issues and practices related to these tasks through class exercises, software tools, or lab experiments. Prerequisite: ELET325 73 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours Hardware and software methods for control of microprocessor systems are covered. Prerequisite: ELET150 3 Semester Credit Hours Students utilize rhetoric and analysis to develop their expository and persuasive writing skills. Information literacy skills and research techniques are introduced and reinforced. Students compose a research paper using appropriate citation style. Prerequisite: Placement Evaluation or ENGL 099 ENGL101 FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH AND WRITING ENGL250 INTERMEDIATE RESEARCH AND WRITING 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop their expository and persuasive writing skills through varied writing experiences. Information literacy skills and research techniques are introduced and reinforced. Students apply their information literacy and writing skills to produce a paper which incorporates research in appropriate APA citation style. Prerequisite: Placement Evaluation or ENGL099 ENGL101 RESEARCH AND WRITING I 3 Semester Credit Hours This course builds on the research and writing skills developed in ENGL 101 Fundamentals of Research and Writing. Students make critical decisions about the research necessary to produce diverse writings appropriate in content, format, and documentation. Using their research, students produce documents that will positively affect varied audiences. Prerequisite: Placement ENGL100 or ENGL101 ENGL250 RESEARCH AND WRITING II financial decision making. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of business finance and will learn the basic concepts of time value of money, asset valuation and risk and return. FINA260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop their expository and persuasive writing skills through varied writing experiences. Information literacy skills and research techniques are introduced and reinforced. Students apply their information literacy and writing skills to produce a paper which incorporates research in appropriate APA citation style. Prerequisite: Placement Evaluation or ENGL099 ENGL110 ORAL PRESENTATIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course builds on the research and writing skills developed in ENGL 101 Fundamentals of Research and Writing. Students make critical decisions about the research necessary to produce diverse writings appropriate in content, format, and documentation. Using their research, students produce documents that will positively affect varied audiences. Prerequisite: Placement ENGL100 or ENGL101 ENGL295 INTERPERSONAL AND SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: Taken in term student earns 60th credit hour FINA371 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the principles and techniques of preparing and delivering effective oral and written presentations to individuals and diverse small and large groups. Emphasis is on the development of poise, listening skills, and clear, logical technologically proficient presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL100 ENGL120 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the principles and theories of human communication with emphasis on interpersonal and small group communication. Students apply the essentials of communication transactions in a variety of settings and explore problem-solving techniques within small group scenarios. Prerequisite: ENGL100 ENGL305 ADVANCED RESEARCH & WRITING 3 Semester Credit Hours Financial planning process; client/planner interactions; time value of money applications; personal financial statements development and assessment; cash flow and debt management; asset acquisition; education planning; planning elements of risk management; investment planning; and retirement planning; special needs planning review; integrating planning recommendations; financial planning ethics review; overview of practice management concepts. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: FINA200 FINA372 INSURANCE PLANNING 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of literature in a variety of genres, to provide an aesthetic appreciation of the selected works, an understanding of the basic methods of literary analysis, and an understanding of various approaches to writing about literature. Prerequisite: ENGL100 ENGL230 WRITING FOR BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a background in advanced composition strategies and advanced research methodologies through the study of qualitative research methodologies to develop and enhance professional and academic writing skills. Prerequisite: ENGL250 or ENGL230 ENGL305 RESEARCH AND WRITING III 3 Semester Credit Hours This course introduces students to risk management and insurance decisions in personal financial planning. Topics include insurance for life, health, disability, property and liability risks, as well as annuities, group insurance, and long term care. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: FINA371 FINA373 INVESTMENT PLANNING 3 Semester Credit Hours Students analyze communication opportunities and audiences to utilize the writing process in preparation of coherent attractive professional documents that use visuals to enhance the meaning of the intended message, with an end result that fosters positive relationships and enhances the flow of ideas. Prerequisite: ENGL100 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a background in advanced composition strategies and advanced research methodologies through the study of qualitative research methodologies to develop and enhance professional and academic writing skills. Prerequisite: ENGL250 or ENGL230 Financial Services (FINA) FINA200 FINANCE PRINCIPLES 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides the student with an understanding of the various types of securities traded in financial markets, investment theory and practice, portfolio construction and management, and investment strategies and tactics. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: FINA371 FINA374 INCOME TAX PLANNING 74 3 Semester Credit Hours This survey course provides a general overview of financial management with a focus on the tools and techniques used in 3 Semester Credit Hours The course focuses on principles and current law and practice of income taxation and its impact on financial planning for individuals, couples and families in their roles as investors, employees and business owners. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: FINA371 FINA375 RETIREMENT PLANNING GRAD115 PAGE LAYOUT GRAD240 GRAPHIC DESIGN II 3 Semester Credit Hours Retirement planning focuses on preparation for retirement. The course will include the importance of retirement planning, an evaluation of the client's needs, and an understanding of Social Security and Medicare, and qualified and non-qualified retirement plans. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: FINA371 FINA476 ESTATE PLANNING 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to the fundamentals of computer design and production is offered. Students utilize industry-standard software to execute typographic designs, manipulate text and create page layouts. GRAD120 TYPOGRAPHY AND LAYOUT 3 Semester Credit Hours History, letterstyle, structure, and construction of type is studied. Students gain an understanding of how type is used in design, selection of type, creative use of type and combining type with images in grid layouts. Prerequisite: GRAD100 GRAD130 PRODUCTION FOR DESIGN 3 Semester Credit Hours Skills and methods learned in Graphic Design I are expanded to solve complex design problems in Graphic Design II. The design process, visual techniques, and production methods will be applied to longterm projects which contain multiple components. Simulated client meetings will challenge students to determine objectives and complete design briefs. The relationship of graphic design in advertising will also be explored. Prerequisite: GRAD220 GRAD250 ADVANCED PAGE LAYOUT 3 Semester Credit Hours Estate Planning focuses on the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth, consistent with the client's goals. It is a study of the legal, tax, financial and non-financial aspects of this process, covering topics such as trusts, wills, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers and related taxes. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: FINA371 FINA460 PRACTICUM AND CAPSTONE PROJECT 3 Semester Credit Hours Students gain an understanding of print production and printing technologies through lecture and hands-on projects. Managing production, mechanicals, paper, and electronic pre-press are covered. GRAD215 DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION 3 Semester Credit Hours Students utilize up-to-date page layout software, while developing skills in importing and editing text, working with typography, importing and linking graphics, and combining files into books. Prerequisites: GRAD115, GRAD215, GRAD230 GRAD255 FREELANCE DESIGN 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will compile portfolios of their work for presentation in the design field. Selections will be re-worked, added, and developed for the portfolio. Employment strategies and career expectations are explored while also learning the in-depth development of marketing themselves in the freelance field. Additional focus will be on client/designer relations and small business development. Prerequisites: GRAD100, INMD100, INMD120 or GRAD100, GRAD215, GRAD230 GRAD260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will design, execute and present the outcomes of a capstone project conducted during a practicum field experience. Students will be challenged to use their knowledge, skills and behaviors developed over the course of their program studies to solve real-world problems in their career discipline. Students will be evaluated from both academic and professional standards. The capstone project will be a portfolio development exhibit. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: Final Semester 3 Semester Credit Hours Students apply advanced design and illustration techniques to produce graphic design projects on the computer. Emphasis is on production of design and images through an illustration software program. GRAD216 WEB LAYOUT 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will continue to develop and apply their computer design skills in the creation of web pages. Prerequisites: GRAD100, GRAD215, GRAD230 or GRAD100, INMD100, INMD120 GRAD220 GRAPHIC DESIGN I Graphic Design (GRAD) GRAD100 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN 3 Semester Credit Hours An advanced course where students develop skills in the synthesis of words and image to communicate messages. The concepts of creative thinking, design, layout, and production are explored to produce design projects. Prerequisites: GRAD100, GRAD120 GRAD230 IMAGING TECHNOLOGY HIST300 TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD HISTORY 3 Semester Credit Hours Exploration of electronic image scanning, manipulation, and alteration to solve complex design problems. 3 Semester Credit Hours A survey of key developments and prevalent themes in world history. Students study how select world-wide events affected the social and cultural fabric of a cross section of Western and Non-Western nations. 75 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours Students demonstrate the process of creative problem solving by producing thumbnail sketches and rough layouts to complete communication problems. Students will identify and apply the elements and principles of design through various projects and techniques including traditional rendering, color techniques, basic drawing skills and use of multiple mediums. 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the College. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester History (HIST) Hospitality & Travel (HOTT) HOTT100 INTRODUCTION TO TOURISM 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to the tourism industry, its history, development, structure, and interrelationships. Functions and career opportunities are explored in transportation, tourism, and in the retail, wholesale, and tour operations of the travel trade. Students utilize the OAG and OAG Travel Planner and learn the basics of automobile, airline, and hotel reservation booking. HOTT101 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and participate in the formal hiring process of the host site. Successful candidates will be employed by the host site for the duration of the experience and may be offered full-time employment if they complete with an acceptable rating. All employment decisions are made at the sole discretion of the host facility. Prerequisite: HOTT111 HOTT122 DISNEY EXPERIENCE HOTT211 COMPUTERIZED HOTEL SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours Front desk and management software applications for property and food service. Reservations systems, guest accounting, food cost controls, and manager reports are emphasized. Prerequisites: ACCT110 & INFT100 HOTT220 TRAVEL COMPUTING AND TICKETING II 3 Semester Credit Hours A survey of the lodging and food service industry, its growth, history, development, and organization. Functions and career opportunities are analyzed in hotel/motel, food service, beverage, and other hospitality establishments by focusing on industry opportunities and future trends. HOTT110 GEOGRAPHY I 9 Semester Credit Hours This course will provide students with work experience at Disney World, Orlando, Florida. Criteria: Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0, full time status, and complete an interview process with a Disney representative. Upon acceptance to the course, the student is responsible for his or her transportation to and from Orlando, Florida. Students will be housed on the Disney property and their housing costs will be deducted from their weekly compensation. Corequisite: HOTT260 HOTT130 GEOGRAPHY III 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop operational skills in preparing world-wide itineraries, issuing reservations and ticketing, and alternative methods using a computerized reservation system. Related topics include documentation, health certificates, tourist cards, money exchange, hotels, car rentals, and restrictions encountered by tourists. Prerequisite: HOTT210 HOTT221 HOTEL FRONT DESK OPERATIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours The historic, cultural, and physical geography of the United States are presented from a tourism viewpoint. Students will identify major cities, airports, and select hotels, resorts, and parks and tourist attractions throughout the United States. HOTT111 FOOD AND BEVERAGE SERVICE 3 Semester Credit Hours An in-depth analysis of full-service hotel food and beverage operation is presented. Students become acquainted with dining room, banquet, room service, and coffee shop operations. Management, personnel practices, and service to guests are also studied. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT120 GEOGRAPHY II 3 Semester Credit Hours The historic, cultural, and physical geography of Europe, Asia, South Pacific, Middle East, and Africa are presented from a tourism viewpoint. Students will identify major cities, airport codes, entry requirements, languages, hotels and resorts, and parks and tourist attractions located in select countries and regions. Prerequisite: HOTT100 HOTT140 GEOGRAPHY IV 3 Semester Credit Hours Students are introduced to the front-of-thehouse operations of a hotel. A systematic approach details the flow of business through a hotel in areas such as reservations, guest reception, bell service, desk clerking, and cashiering. The interdependencies of the various departments of a hotel are explored in relation to front-office management, handling complaints, and concerns regarding hotel safety and security. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT226 MENU PLANNING & NUTRITION JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours The historic, cultural, and physical geography of Canada, Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Caribbean, Mexico, and Central and South America are presented from a tourism viewpoint. Students will identify major cities, airport codes, entry requirements, languages, hotels and resorts, and parks and tourist attractions located in select countries and regions. Prerequisite: HOTT100 HOTT121 COOPERATIVE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours The historic, cultural, and physical geography of Asia, South Pacific, Middle East, and Africa are presented from a tourism viewpoint. Students will identify major cities, airport codes, entry requirements, languages, hotels and resorts, and parks and tourist attractions located in select countries and regions. Prerequisite: HOTT100 HOTT210 TRAVEL COMPUTING AND TICKETING I 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to cuisine and cost consideration with a focus on cultural, ethnic, and health considerations and preparation is offered. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT230 TRAVEL SALES AND MARKETING 76 12 Semester Credit Hours A minimum of 360 hours spent in on-site training at a local food services facility under the supervision and evaluation of the cooperative facility and the College. Students 3 Semester Credit Hours Operation of a computerized reservation system provides students with the capability to function on the various systems used throughout the industry. Acquired knowledge of fare structure, routes and schedules, airline and city codes, and itinerary planning are applied. Appropriate tariffs, rules, and procedures, together with industry reference guides and related materials are used to create and service travel and tourism products. Prerequisites: HOTT100 & INFT100 3 Semester Credit Hours The marketing, sales, and public relations techniques used in the travel and hospitality industries to promote tourism and attract different market segments are presented. Destination and market-share development, new promotions, tours and cruises, telephone techniques, and client counseling are covered along with analysis of the relative effectiveness of television, radio, print, and other media in meeting advertising objectives. Prerequisite: HOTT100 HOTT231 CONVENTION SALES AND SERVICE 3 Semester Credit Hours An overview of the scope of group business as it relates to hotels and restaurants. Sales, planning, accommodations, record keeping, company profiles, and planned events are discussed with attention to those factors necessary for successful execution. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT236 BEVERAGE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT HUMA315 TOPICS IN WORLD CIVILIZATION: EARLY COMPARATIVE CULTURES HURS 133 EMPLOYMENT LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides a survey of responsible alcohol service, promotion, cost considerations, liquor liability, and training considerations. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT241 FOOD AND BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours The course will focus primarily on literature, architecture, cultural history, art, music and philosophy within a framework, which explores the roots and continuity of cultures. An inter-disciplinary approach to culture from ancient civilizations through the middle ages will be taken. HUMA316 TOPICS IN WORLD CIVILIZATION: WESTERN CULTURE FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE LATE 20TH CENTURY 3 Semester Credit Hours Principles of food service management are presented including beverage management, forecasting and budgeting, cost control and analysis, menu planning, restaurant design, legal, safety and sanitation requirements. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT251 HOUSEKEEPING & SECURITY MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to western culture from the Renaissance through the late twentieth century. The course will focus primarily on literature, architecture, cultural history, art, music and philosophy within a framework that explores the roots and continuity of cultures. 3 Semester Credit Hours This course uses a "life cycle" approach in order to introduce the student to the legal issues that exist in the context of human resources management. Students will trace the employment cycle and address issues related to hiring, recruitment, and background checks. The course will also explore issues that arise during the tenure of employment including harassment, discrimination, privacy, benefits and compensation, performance appraisal and termination, and workplace safety. Current events and legal cases are used to illustrate important concepts with questions designed to prompt the student to think critically about the issues involved from an ezmployer's viewpoint. HURS 261 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE Human Resources (HURS) HURS 103 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN RESOURCE FUNCTIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to management duties for lodging and institutional housekeeping departments is offered. Emphasis is on staffing, managing inventories, sanitation supplies, hazard communication guidelines, and cleaning procedures for guest rooms and public areas. Students also study issues and considerations involved in the design of security programs. Safety equipment and procedures, guest and asset protection, emergency management programs, and government regulations that apply to lodging properties are examined. Prerequisite: HOTT101 HOTT260/261 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will be introduced to the tasks and duties performed in both large and small organizations' human resource functional areas. The seven major human resource functions that will be considered are: human resource planning, recruitment, and selection, human resource development, compensation and benefits, safety and health, employee and labor relations, and human resource research. HURS 107 INTRODUCTION TO COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a personal marketing plan. Prerequisite: Taken in term student earns 60th credit hour Information Technology (INFT) INFT110 ADVANCED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Humanities (HUMA) HUMA310 TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD LITERATURE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students explore and analyze select themes in modern literature by comparing and contrasting approaches from Western and Non-Western novels, short stories, and essays. 77 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the College. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215 & Final Semester 3 Semester Credit Hours This course offers an introduction to the systems, methods, and procedures involved in the administration and oversight of compensation and benefits within organizations. HURS 113 LAW & ETHICS IN THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours Students explore the more advanced concepts utilized in spreadsheet and database technology. A continuation of the students' proficiency development using the integrated office suite is accomplished through the application of advanced skills. Prerequisite: INFT100 or OFST200 or INFT111 or CSCI100 INFT111 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will study how the law sets behavior standards and a system for compliance with those standards. Students will also be introduced to the concept of ethics, a system of moral values, which addresses what one should do regardless of what the law requires that one must do. Students will explore both the legal and ethical principles involved through the use of case studies. 3 Semester Credit Hours This survey course focuses on the application of technology and how technology may be used by the student for personal and professional gain, both now and in the future. Students are presented with the underlying principles of technologies that have an impact on our lives and how those principles are related to real-world activities. Students will explore career opportunities as well as learn the terminology, concepts, and operations that are essential to a career in Information Technology. Prerequisite: Computer Literacy Placement Exam or INFT100, or CSCI100 INFT120 PROGRAMMING I 3 Semester Credit Hours Students learn a programming language where they will develop skills in data handling, modular programming style, structured programming and user interface development. Prerequisite: INFT111 INFT130 HARDWARE AND OPERATING SYSTEMS common problems while supporting users of Microsoft Office applications while running the Microsoft Windows XP operating system in either a home or corporate setting. By successfully completing this course students will be prepared to take Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician Exam #70-272. Prerequisite: INFT130 INFT224 DATABASE PROGRAMMING security techniques are learned and demonstrated through the use of case studies. This course assists the students in preparing for the CompTIA's security + examination. Prerequisite: INFT130 INFT245 INTERNET NETWORK ADMINISTRATION 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students learn to troubleshoot, repair, and replace common hardware components as well as the fundamentals of operating systems, which include installation, configuration, and troubleshooting. By successfully completing this course, students will be prepared to take the A+ certification examination. Prerequisite: INFT111 INFT140 INTERNET & WEB PAGE DEVELOPMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours SQL (Structured Query Language) is introduced in order to develop students' skills in creating and utilizing relational databases. Students will identify and describe the uses and importance of databases in a business environment. Prerequisite: INFT111 INFT225 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours An overview of the use of networks, TCP/IP, DNS, address translation and security issues as they pertain to Internet usage. Prerequisite: INFT230 INFT250 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN 3 Semester Credit Hours An overview of Internet and world wide web fundamentals, including history, protocols, browsers, e-mail, security, legal issues, HTML language, HTML editors, and web site design. Prerequisite: INFT100, INFT111, OFST200 or CSCI100 INFT220 PROGRAMMING II 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will apply advanced SQL (Structured Query Language) programming techniques to database problems. The focus of the course will be on database development techniques that solve business problems from design through testing. Prerequisite: INFT224 INFT230 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKS 3 Semester Credit Hours A capstone course where students apply concepts and techniques learned in prior courses. Students work with the systems development life cycle to investigate design, and implement a systems project. Prerequisite: Final Semester or Dean's permission INFT260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students apply advanced programming techniques and workplace skills in data handling and programming techniques utilizing a contemporary object oriented programming language. Prerequisite: INFT120 INFT222 SUPPORT & TROUBLESHOOTING OS (Operating Systems) 3 Semester Credit Hours The study of network operating systems and their configuration requirements. Basic functionality, maintenance, management, service, and support will be covered. This course assists students in preparing for the CompTIA's Network + certification exam. Prerequisite: INFT111 INFT238 WINDOWS SERVER ADMINISTRATION 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester INFT310 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY III JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course offers an in-depth study of all the functions and features of installing, configuring, and maintaining the Windows XP operating system. Students learn troubleshooting solutions to common problems while supporting users of Windows XP OS. By successfully completing this course students will be prepared to take Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician Exam #70-271. Prerequisite: INFT130 INFT223 SUPPORT & TROUBLESHOOTING DESKTOP APPLICATIONS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides for an in-depth study of installation, configuration, maintenance, and troubleshooting the services available within a network infrastructure. Students will concentrate their learning on the Windows Server 2003 configuration and management. Prerequisite: INFT130 INFT240 INTERNET PROGRAMMING 3 Semester Credit Hours Students apply advanced applications software techniques with spreadsheet and database software. In addition, students learn to use project management and personal information management software in order to strengthen their ability to manage projects and improve personal productivity. Prerequisite: INFT110 INFT320 MANAGING DATABASE SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of Internet programming techniques used to develop Internet applications. Prerequisite: INFT140 INFT242 NETWORK & PC SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS 78 3 Semester Credit Hours This course offers an in-depth study of all the functions and features of installing, configuring, and maintaining Microsoft Office on the Windows XP operating system. Students learn trouble-shooting solutions to 3 Semester Credit Hours Students learn the elements of practical network and computer security. Applied 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will learn how to design and implement hierarchical networks and relational database systems. The implementation of database system security and the assessment of the final outputs of the database system will also be stressed. This course provides students with the background to design, implement and use database management systems. It introduces, in a comparative framework, the structure, requirements, functions and evolution of database management systems. After covering conceptual data modeling and the entity relationship data model, the course focuses on the relational data model. Students learn abstract languages such as relational algebra and relational calculus, including their commercial implementations like SQL, QBE, etc. Database design is covered and concepts of data integrity, security, privacy, and concurrence control are introduced. Students implement a major database application project. Prerequisite: INFT224 INFT325 INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT the local community or the instructor. This opportunity to apply what they have learned to an existing information systems problem will provide the students with constructive experience. Prerequisites: INFT250 & BUSS420 INMD215 INTERACTIVE DESIGN I Interactive Media Design (INMD) INMD100 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DESIGN 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will offer an introduction to Macromedia Flash. Some topics covered will be motion and shape tweening, movie clips, interactivity, buttons, text edits and navigation systems. Prerequisites: INMD100, INMD130 or GRAD215 INMD216 USABILITY II 3 Semester Credit Hours This course examines the principles of information security to help prepare students for their future roles as business decision makers in the digital age. Emphasis is placed on the skills needed to analyze and evaluate information security problems within a real world context, particularly in the areas of the intranets, Internet, World Wide Web and electronic commerce. The topics to be covered during the semester include: auditing and policy development, risk analysis, investigations and legal issues, cost-effective counter-measures, intrusion detection systems, practical aspects of cryptography, business continuity and disaster recovery, and security roles within an organization. Organizational Security Management offers extensive opportunities for hands-on work and case analysis. Prerequisite: INFT230 INFT330 MANAGING INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will provide an introduction to the interactive design field as well as familiarity with both Macintosh and PC platforms. Some topics covered will be basic digital imaging and programming, including basic HTML, XHTML, JavaScript and styles. INMD110 WEB DEVELOPMENT I 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will further the knowledge of HCI from the webmaster's viewpoint and focus on security issues, passwords, login, hacking, and correcting usability problems after testing. Prerequisites: INMD100, INMD115 Corequisite: INMD110 INMD220 WEB DEVELOPMENT II 3 Semester Credit Hours This course builds on the basic Web design skills obtained in INMD100 and moves toward more in-depth sites, focusing on multiple issues including maintenance, organization and client designer relationships. Some topics covered will be XHTML, CSS, XML and Javascript. Prerequisite: INMD100 INMD115 USABILITY I 3 Semester Credit Hours This course builds on the skills obtained in INMD110 and contains an in-depth overview of UNIX, JavaScript, SQL and CGI script. Students will incorporate both client-side and server-side programming. Prerequisites: INMD100, INMD110 INMD230 INTERACTIVE DESIGN II 3 Semester Credit Hours The course introduces to the student the essential components of the information systems and the knowledge required to effectively manage information systems in business organizations. The students will be exposed to the role of information systems in organizations, the technical foundations of information systems, and the communication networks that interconnect information systems components. Prerequisite: INFT230 INFT400 PROGRAMMING III 3 Semester Credit Hours This course focuses on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) which will enable the designer to obtain knowledge from the user's standpoint, such as basic user interface design principles and the methods of usability development. Prerequisite: INMD100 INMD120 RASTER GRAPHICS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will take an advanced approach to Macromedia Flash. Some topics covered will be using audio and video in Flash, Flash plugin detection, and a full understanding of ActionScript. Prerequisites: INMD100, NMD120, INMD215 INMD240 CURRENT IT TRENDS INMD130 VECTOR GRAPHICS INFT450 INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECT 3 Semester Credit Hours Using the knowledge and skills developed in the program's previous courses, students will work in teams to resolve an information systems problem presented by a client from 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will develop the student's knowledge of vector graphics and illustration techniques as well as converting bitmaps to vector artwork. These skills will assist in the integration process with other programs based on data driven and interactive web sites. INMD255 WEB PUBLISHING 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is designed to provide the essentials of creating documents for distribution through the Internet, including 79 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of advanced programming techniques that include arrays, pointers, file I/O, advanced data structure, and developing a user interface. Prerequisite: Dean's Permission 3 Semester Credit Hours Students taking this course will develop a thorough understanding of Adobe Photoshop and ImageReady and its image editing and manipulating abilities that are necessary for the web design industry. Some topics covered will be creating images to view on the web, saving images as jpegs or gifs, creating navigational icons, and using Photoshop to assist in designing web pages. Corequisite: INMD100 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will take students through current Interactive Media issues and theories in today's society. Topics will be updated and adapted as societal issues change. Prerequisite: INMD100 INMD250 INTERACTIVE DESIGN III 3 Semester Credit Hours Throughout this course, students will create interactive media for both the Internet and CD- ROM. They will incorporate video, audio, text and images using Macromedia Director. Prerequisites: INMD100, INMD120, INMD215 design and preparation of documents for electronic distribution using Macromedia Dreamweaver. Prerequisites: INMD100, INMD120 INMD260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the College. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester required for pursuit of a technical degree. Intermediate algebraic, geometric and trigonometric manipulation is used to obtain a solution. An analysis of the solution is reviewed to determine the reasonableness of the answer. Also, calculations involving numbers in base two, ten, and sixteen. Prerequisite: MATH103 MATH290 STATISTICS MATH401 CALCULUS FOR SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is designed to provide a basis for business decisions through an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics and to the important methods of statistical inference. Prerequisite: MATH103 MATH301 CALCULUS 3 Semester Credit Hours Block diagrams in systems and mathematical software tools are used to solve complex differential equations. Practical examples with graphical tools are applied in solving electrical circuit problems using MATLAB. The role of the characteristics roots of the system in system solution is studied through Bode plots with the aid of software tools. Prerequisite: MATH311 MATH403 PROGRAMMING IN MATLAB Introduction to Information Literacy & Research (LIBS) LIBS100 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION LITERACY AND RESEARCH 3 Semester Credit Hours This hands-on course will begin with basic computer literacy to prepare students to develop information literacy skills mastery. The focus will then be on understanding the research process, selecting and evaluating a variety of electronic and print resources to answer research questions, and communicating and citing information found. Search techniques will be demonstrated and practiced. The impact of the use and availability of information locally, nationally, and globally will be discussed. Students will develop information and computer literacy by applying these skills in a variety of projects. Students will also gain a working knowledge of the resources available in the Bryant & Stratton College campus based and virtual libraries. Students use their information literacy skills to complete a reflective essay, descriptive essay of their chosen career, and a process analysis essay, all of which contribute to the student learning portfolio. 3 Semester Credit Hours Students learn the foundations of calculus and its applications in engineering problem solving. The concepts and basic laws of differentiation and integration are demonstrated through the use of software tools. Practical examples with graphical results are applied in solving problems of electrical circuits and physics of motion using first order differential methods. Prerequisite: MATH103 MATH303 PROBABILITY & ENGINEERING RELIABILITY 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to software tools used for mathematical and calculus programming is presented. Students apply repetitive calculations using loop and branch structure as well as displaying of input-output results. Calculus applications in engineering using Laplace transform, transfer function, and SIMULINK are demonstrated through class exercises and home projects. Prerequisite: MATH311 Medical Insurance Billing & Coding (MIBC) MIBC 235 HEALTH CARE REIMBURSEMENT/BILLING EMPHASIS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students are introduced to probability and statistical concepts and terminologies, distribution functions and their application to the field of engineering, and statistical methods of industrial quality control. Prerequisite: MATH103 MATH309 STATISTICS 3 Semester Credit Hours Reimbursement methods and proper coding procedures for various insurance and managed care plans are covered. Eligibility requirements, processing, collection, and computerized patient accounting procedures are emphasized. Prerequisite: AHLT 100, OFST 100 Corequisite: MIBC 250 (MAA Only) MIBC 236 ADVANCED BILLING Mathematics (MATH) MATH103 SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is designed to provide a basis for business decisions through an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistics and to the important methods of statistical inference. Prerequisite: MATH103 MATH311 CALCULUS FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 3 Semester Credit Hours Evaluation of documentation and abstract records to assign diagnostic and procedural codes for in-patient and out-patient billing are covered in depth. Prerequisite: AHLT100, MIBC235 Corequisite: MIBC255 MIBC 250 CODING I JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours Students employ a wide range of problem solving strategies. This course introduces measurement, consumer math, quantitative reasoning, statistics, different numeration systems, and optional topics according to student needs. Prerequisite: Placement Evaluation or MATH097 MATH112 ANALYTICAL MATHEMATICS 80 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop the mathematical skills 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the foundations of differential equations related to electrical engineering applications. First and second order differential equations and the use of Laplace transform to solve equations of electrical circuitry are emphasized. An introduction to infinite series is included in this course. Software tools are utilized extensively. Prerequisite: MATH301 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the purpose and use of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) classification system. Topics include coding conventions, coding principles, and CMS official coding guidelines (inpatient and outpatient). Students will be required to assign ICD-9-CM codes to diagnosis/procedure statements, case abstracts, and patient records. Use of the ICD9-CM coding manual and a computerized encoder is incorporated; inpatient, outpatient, and physician office reimbursement systems are discussed. Prerequisite: AHLT 100, OFST 100 Corequisite: MIBC 235 MIBC 255 ADVANCED CODING II course addresses the importance of understanding human anatomy and physiology in a medical coding environment. MRC 115 INTRODUCTION TO CODING MRCP 200 DIAGNOSTIC CODING FOR PHYSICIAN SERVICES 3 Semester Credit Hours Study and practice of the principles of Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) classification systems. Prerequisite: AHLT100, MIBC250 Corequisite: MIBC236 MIBC 260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Introduction to Coding introduces students to the concept and theory of diagnostic and procedural coding in physician and hospital environments. It presents all three major code sets: ICD-9, CPT, and HCPCS. In this course, students will explore the purpose and application of each code set on a high level, focusing on protocols, hierarchies, and other high-level concepts to help navigate through the code sets. For institutions that offer both Physician and Hospital, students will consider how they might use these code sets in their future careers, and choose either a physician or hospital coding direction for their continued studies in this program. MRC 135 DIAGNOSTIC CODING: ICD-9-CM 3 Semester Credit Hours Diagnostic Coding for Physician Services builds on Diagnostic Coding: ICD-9-CM by presenting more complex sequencing and protocol for diagnostic coding specific to physician services. Students will demonstrate medical necessity by code assignment, and will be able to translate physician documentation to code. Students will gain invaluable experience by hands-on coding of physician services performed in both inpatient and outpatient settings. MRCP 220 HEALTHCARE COMMON PROCEDURE CODING SYSTEM LEVEL I AND LEVEL II 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a personal marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisite: SOSC215 & Final Semester Medical Reimbursement & Coding (MRC) See Degree Plan for course sequencing requirements. MRC100 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours Medical Terminology is the foundation that starts the learning process in this program for non-clinical students entering the coding and billing field. Students will read, write, and pronounce the components of the language of medicine that are imperative to medical coding, and communication with medical professionals. They will analyze the prefix, root, and suffix of medical terms, enabling them to analyze the basic meaning. The pronunciation rules will be introduced, as well as singular and plural words. Students will be able to identify the most common medical terms associated with all the body systems identified in the American Medical Association's Current Procedural Terminology (CPT). MRC105 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours Diagnostic Coding explores diagnostic coding for physician services, according to the World Health Organization and the American Health Association's guidelines and conventions. Students will learn the protocol specific to diagnostically coding illness, injury, and medical services for patients receiving healthcare services in hospitals and physician practices. The students delve into the standard of medical necessity in detail. Idiosyncratic protocols are introduced to raise the student's awareness of specific "correct coding" standards. MRC 145 CODING COMPLIANCE & ETHICS 3 Semester Credit Hours Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System Level I and II further explores the components of the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) coding manuals that students were introduced to in Introduction to Coding. The Level I code set is comprised of the CPT which covers coding of procedures. The Level II code set covers products, supplies, and services. Students will also practice reporting anesthesia services, surgical procedures, diagnostic testing, and modifiers by code assignment. Students will become familiar with the format of the book sections, specific language, and interpretation of chapter and category guidelines. The National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) bundling and unbundling rules will also be explored. MRCP 240 EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES 3 Semester Credit Hours Anatomy and Physiology is foundational to the Medical Reimbursement and Coding program. It focuses on the structure and function of the human body to prepare coders to abstract clinical information from medical records. Students will explore the structure and function of body systems and emphasize the proper use of anatomical terms. The 81 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course, like the others in the program, contains important information that will help students pass certifying examinations, and prepare them for the professionalism required of participants in the coding and reimbursement field. In this course, students will be introduced to compliance programs, including the components of these programs. They will explore the legal considerations involved in compliance. The students will review applicable industry and oversight agency standards, as well as enforcement activities. They will explore Medicare program and patient protection activities specific to Medical Fraud and Abuse, with specific attention to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). 3 Semester Credit Hours Evaluation and Management Services takes students through the process of analyzing the components of evaluation and management services to enable them to correctly assign and measure a patient's category of service and assign appropriate codes and modifiers based on that category. Students will access the CMS guidelines for E/M Services and distinguish between the 1995 and 1997 guidelines in order to assign appropriate E/M codes to documentation. MRCP280 CODING PRACTICUM: PHYSICIAN CODER 3 Semester Credit Hours The Coding Practicum is the realization of the efforts in the previous courses. Students are provided real-life documentation scenarios that are coded from all three code sets, according to the coding concentration respective to their specialty, Physician or Hospital. The student will be challenged with complex coding and documentation issues, compliance issues, and the reimbursement methodologies specific to each. Prerequisite: Final semester MRCP289 VIRTUAL CAREER: PHYSICIAN CODER 3 Semester Credit Hours This course puts students into to real-world situations in a physician's practice. Students perform coding using real data and documentation to complete job-related tasks respective to their concentration of study. This is an opportunity for students to practice professional standards of accuracy, productivity, and reporting in this realistic virtual environment. Students will provide researched and documented support of their findings for a medical record audit, and will create a reporting tool to communicate with physicians. Prerequisite: Final Semester and technologies in the lab portion of the course, and students will also discover how to install patches and upgrades to the Windows NOS as part of the lab process. Prerequisite: TECH130 & TECH140 NETW210 NETWORKING WITH THE UNIX/LINUX NETWORKING OPERATING SYSTEMS design, install, configure, secure, and troubleshoot a network system from scratch. The networks will require interoperability between two different network operating systems. Prerequisites: Final Semester NETW260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE Natural Science (NSCI) NSCI280 ECOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours This course introduces students to environmental science, and examines the human/environmental relationship, fundamental ecological principles, energy resources, human impact on ecosystems, and industry's impact on ecosystems, natural disasters, and cutting-edge environmental issues. 3 Semester Credit Hours Explores administering LAN and WAN networks using the UNIX/Linux network operating systems (NOS). In this course students will discover how to install UNIX/Linux software on both servers and client workstations. The course will also allow students to learn about adding and configuring directories and users, shell commands, performance monitoring, network security, policy creation, interoperability with other NOSs and clients, and how to add upgrades to a UNIX/Linux-based network. Students will work hands-on with these technologies in a lab portion for the course. Hands-on experience with UNIX/Linux commands and troubleshooting techniques will also be emphasized. Note: This course will only be offered online. Prerequisite: TECH140 NETW220 WIRELESS NETWORKS AND WAN'S IN THE ENTERPRISE 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the students' learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester Nursing (NURS) NURS100 INTRODUCTION TO NURSING Network Technology Courses (NETW) NETW150 ROUTING & SWITCHING IN NETWORKED ENVIRONMENTS 3 Semester Credit Hours Builds on router configuration and switching technologies learned in TECH140. Students will use the TCP/IP protocol suite, command line interfaces (CLI), access control lists (ACLs), switching configurations, Quality of Service principles, and various maintenance tools on real networks as part of this course's lab requirement. Students will also build on their skills by building and troubleshooting various networks with their routing and switching knowledge. Prerequisite: TECH140 NETW200 NETWORKING WITH THE WINDOWS NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEM 3 Semester Credit Hours Covers wireless networks and the technologies that make them operate. Students will discover the typical components of wireless networks and types of clients that work with wireless networks. Attention will be given to the design and implementation of wireless LANs and WANs as well as how to properly secure the wireless network. Topics on troubleshooting wireless networks and wireless devices will also be covered. Prerequisite: TECH140 NETW240 NETWORK SECURITY AND FORENSIC FUNDAMENTALS 1 Semester Credit Hour This course introduces the roles and responsibilities of nurses from a historical view to present day. Students are introduced to the concepts of contemporary health care and discuss nursing as a profession and ethical/legal concerns. NURS101 NURSING FUNDAMENTALS 82 3 Semester Credit Hours Covers network administration using the Windows network operating system (NOS). Students will learn how to install and configure server and client-based software, establish domain controllers, manage users, design and manage the active directory, subnetting, security, and domain policies. Students will also encounter topics on network security and establishing Internet access gateways on a Window-based network. Monitoring network performance, troubleshooting, and interoperability with other NOSs will also be covered. Those taking INFT 200 will practice with these concepts JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours Students learn the elements of practical network and computer security. Applied security techniques are learned and demonstrated through the use of case studies. Students will also discover the fundamentals of computer forensics. Students will learn how to properly aid the investigation of network security breaches and relevant laws related to computer forensics. This course assists the students in preparing for the CompTIA's Security + examination. Note: This course will only be offered online. NETW250 NETWORK DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION 5 Semester Credit Hours This course helps students develop the basic skills of the nurse. This course builds on the introductory course information of the practice of nursing and the nursing process. It provides evidence-based rationale for nursing actions. Skill attainment is emphasized in the skills laboratory and through concurrent clinical experience which focuses on the self-care needs of adults, particularly the elderly. Prerequisites: NURS100, BIOL110, ENGL100 & MATH103 Corequisites: BIOL120, BIOL210 NURS125 LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT AND NURSING PRACTICE 3 Semester Credit Hours Growth and development across the lifespan with the focus on normal growth and development. NURS201 FAMILY/CHILD NURSING 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students apply concepts and techniques learned throughout the entire program. A business scenario will be given to student groups, and the groups will plan, 7 Semester Credit Hours This course includes theory and clinical practice in nursing care of the child and childbearing family. Nursing care theory for care of the child and childbearing family will be applied utilizing patient care assignments and observational experiences in acute care and selected community settings. Prerequisites: BIOL205, NURS211, NURS215 NURS211 MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING I 6 Semester Credit Hours This theory and practicum course introduces the student to the role of provider of care for clients with medical/surgical health/illness needs in acute care settings. Emphasis is on developing critical thinking in relation to the nursing process: application of knowledge of pathophysiology, relating principles of patient education, and demonstration of selected nursing interventions. Clinical activities focus on application of these concepts. Prerequisites: NURS101, BIOL210, BIOL120 Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS215 and BIOL205 NURS215 PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSES NURS230 NURSING ISSUES, LEADERSHIP & RESEARCH OFST200 DOCUMENT PRODUCTION 3 Semester Credit Hours The focus of this course is in-depth exploration of clinical leadership and management, current nursing trends, legal/ethical issues in nursing practice, promotion and use of research in nursing practice. Prerequisite: Final Semester of Nursing Program Corequisites: NURS260 NURS260 INTERNSHIP 3 Semester Credit Hours The development of word processing, spreadsheet, and database skills, with an emphasis on speed, accuracy, and the use of reference and resource materials are stressed. The ability to organize, analyze, and evaluate information is featured. Prerequisite: OFST102 OFST205 DESKTOP PUBLISHING 3 Semester Credit Hours The concepts of clinical pharmacology are examined. Drug legislation and the laws governing dispensing of drugs are studied. The mathematics of dosages, metric conversions, and the classification of drugs to include usual dosages, indications, side effects, and contraindications are discussed. Prerequisites: MATH103, NURS101 NURS221 MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING II 2 Semester Credit Hours The focus of this course is to transition from student nurse to graduate nurse. Prerequisite: Final Semester of Nursing Program Corequisites: NURS230 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop proficiency in using desktop publishing software to create a variety of business applications. Documents and graphics are created, edited, and stored by students for use in designing desktop publishing applications such as flyers, brochures, and newsletters. Prerequisite: OFST102, INFT100 or CSCI100 OFST225 LEGAL OFFICE SYSTEMS Office Technology/ Administrative Assisting (OFST) OFST102 DOCUMENT PROCESSING & TRANSCRIPTION 4 Semester Credit Hours This theory and practicum course gives emphasis to increasing critical thinking and clinical decision-making in the care of clients with increasingly complex health/illness needs. Utilizing the nursing process, the student is expected to integrate previous learning to assist the client and family in achieving optimal functioning in various complex health care situations and settings. Clinical experiences are focused on assisting the student to transition to the role of the graduate nurse. Prerequisites: BIOL205, NURS211, NURS215 NURS222 GERIATRIC AND MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 3 Semester Credit Hours Students perform advanced information processing tasks utilizing application software and the transcription of documents with emphasizes on grammar, proofreading, keyboarding speed, accuracy and composition skills. Prerequisite: OFST100 or proficiency OFST110 INTRODUCTION TO LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop administrative skills for the legal office environment. Legal terminology, preparation of legal documents, client billing, law office ethics, communicating in a positive and professional image, filing procedures, and attention to specific state requirements are emphasized. Prerequisites: OFST102, Dean's permission OFST230 INTEGRATED OFFICE SYSTEMS 83 JANUARY 2010 5 Semester Credit Hours This is a theory and practicum course, which builds on the role of the nurse as provider of care and emphasizes the manager of care role for groups of individuals. Clinical activities focus on critical thinking and clinical decision making skills in the care of individuals with long-term care, mental health and rehabilitative needs. Prerequisites: BIOL205, NURS211 3 Semester Credit Hours This course guides the student from a basic introduction of the rationale behind the structure of the American system of government to a discussion of each major area of law in the legal system. Students explore the fundamental legal concepts and principles that provide the foundation for order and stability in American society. OFST120 OFFICE PROCEDURES AND TECHNOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours Students utilize information processing simulation and production assignments to demonstrate workplace competencies and employment standards. Focus is on decisionmaking, teamwork, communication, time management, and efficient use of office technology in completion of projects. Further development on keyboarding skills is emphasized. Prerequisite: OFST200 OFST260/261/262 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is an introduction to administrative office skills utilizing current technology. Emphasis is on filing, mail systems, telecommunication skills, travel and conferencing, finance, correspondence, and interpersonal relations. Prerequisite: OFST100 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester Paralegal (PLEG) PLEG100 INTRODUCTION TO LAW, RESEARCH & ETHICS PLEG150 WILLS, TRUSTS, & PROBATE PLEG260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students are introduced to the skills required of legal researchers and use primary and secondary courses to produce written assignments. Students are given assignments to research the law using appropriate sources in the law library and report their findings in writing assignments. Emphasis is placed on issues of ethics, including confidentiality, conflict of interest, and unauthorized practice of law. Students are introduced to the federal and state courts and the American legal system. PLEG110 CONTRACT LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to the law of wills, trusts, and probate. Instruction includes organization and jurisdiction of the probate court; estate planning, administration, and taxation. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG160 CORPORATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the substantive and procedural operations of the sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation is offered. Students draft documents including articles of incorporation, corporate by-laws, and partnership agreements. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG170 BANKRUPTCY LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the College. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the students' learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester Philosophy (PHIL) PHIL150 INTRODUCTION TO REASONING FOR CRITICAL THINKERS 3 Semester Credit Hours A survey of the nature and purpose of contract law. Topics will include formation and interpretation of agreements, remedies for breach, the effect of changed circumstances, third party interests, and dispute resolution. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG120 TORTS & CIVIL LITIGATION 3 Semester Credit Hours Bankruptcy law and procedure for individuals and businesses are studied. This course covers documentation and effects of liquidation and reorganization from the perspectives of debtor, creditor, and trustee. Corequisite: PLEG110 PLEG190 REAL PROPERTY 3 Semester Credit Hours Students are introduced to informal reasoning and logic to develop critical thinking abilities and strategies. This includes rudimentary discussions and analyses of propositions, arguments, fallacies, deductive and inductive logic, and their roles in the formation of effective and ineffective argumentation. Prerequisite: SOSC101 or SOSC102 PHIL201 CRITICAL THINKING 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the substantive law of tort actions and procedural rules related to the process involved in litigating lawsuits, traditional and alternatives, such as settlement and alternative dispute resolution. Drafting pretrial and post-trial documents such as motions, pleadings, evidence and post trial practice. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG130 CRIMINAL LAW & PROCEDURES 3 Semester Credit Hours An introduction to real estate transactions and conveyances involving the acquisition, ownership, sale, and financing of real property. Emphasis is on forms such as deeds, contracts, and leases; title searches; and closing procedures. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG200 LEGAL RESEARCH II 3 Semester Credit Hours Explore and analyze contemporary topics using analytic methods and metacognitive strategies. Emphasis is on the application of these strategies within the dynamic communities of college, career and life. Students complete a career based ethical controversy research paper which contributes to the student learning portfolio. Prerequisite: SOSC101 or SOSC102 (Except Nursing Students) PHIL250 PRACTICES IN ANALYTIC REASONING & CRITICAL THINKING 3 Semester Credit Hours Criminal substantive law, procedural rules of court, and the constitutional rights of the accused are examined. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG140 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours A more concentrated study of legal ethics is conducted. Topics such as commingling of funds, trust and general accounts, and the unauthorized practice of law are covered. Working in teams, students perform law office tasks such as client billing, file management, telephone etiquette, organizing and managing the law library, and time management for billable hours. Computer applications will be included where appropriate. Prerequisite: PLEG100 3 Semester Credit Hours Emphasis is placed on writing legal briefs, interoffice memoranda, pleadings, and motions. Students research legal authority such as statutes and cases, and present their arguments in a professional quality document. Students analyze cases to determine what law applies to each problem and how judges are likely to decide the applicable law in each case. Hands-on applications with general office and legalspecific software are utilized. Prerequisite: PLEG100 PLEG210 DOMESTIC RELATIONS LAW 3 Semester Credit Hours Explore and analyze contemporary topics using analytic methods and metacognitive strategies. Emphasis is on the application of these strategies within the dynamic communities of college, career and life. Students complete a career based ethical controversy research paper which contributes to the student learning portfolio. Prerequisite: SOSC101 or SOSC102 (Except Nursing Students) PHIL310 LOGIC AND REASONING 84 3 Semester Credit Hours A study of the general practice of family law, including research and preparation of pleadings. Topics include marriage contracts, separation and divorce agreements, custody and support, adoption, and guardianship. Case briefing will be required to illustrate the different aspects of law involving the family. Prerequisite: PLEG110 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students study the rules of argument, inductive and deductive reasoning, the recognition of informal and informal fallacies, and the application of logical thinking inn work and social settings. Prerequisite: PHIL201 or PHIL150 Physics (PHYS) PHYS400 PHYSICS 3 Semester Credit Hours Fundamental topics in classical laws of physics and their applications in engineering technology are covered. Vector and scalar quantities are applied to Newton's laws of mechanics: motion, work, energy, and momentum, both in linear and angular forms. Electric and Magnetic fields, Gauss's and Faraday's Laws, Capacitance, Inductance and ac circuit fundamentals are studied. Prerequisite: MATH301 position themselves to enter and advance in their career. Prerequisite: SOSC101/SOSC102 or PHIL201/ PHIL150 PSYC310 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY SECR240 ETHICAL HACKING 3 Semester Credit Hours This course in organizational psychology utilizes research-based principles and methods to study a variety of topics important to the understanding of human behavior in different organizational and career settings. Prerequisite: PSYC200 or SOSC215 Psychology (PSYC) PSYC101 PSYCHOLOGY Security Technology Courses (SECR) SECR180 INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will learn the art and science of ethical hacking and security testing including how to use the tools and techniques that ethical hackers and security testers use to discover and secure vulnerabilities. Students will also learn how attackers operate and think and by doing so they will be able to offer proactive measures and solutions to protect computer networks. In addition to learning fundamental security testing concepts, students will gain practical knowledge in computer programming, documentation of security testing, and the ethical and legal of both ethical and unethical hacking. Note: This course will only be offered online. SECR242 NETWORKING SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will study the vocabulary, concepts, and theories of psychology as it applies to human development and interaction. Psychological issues will be discussed and researched by students in order to cultivate an informed opinion of the topic. PSYC101 PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours This course features a review of theory and research in social psychology and encourages learners to apply its major principles to situations encountered in everyday life and work. Students investigate the manner in which the behavior, feelings or thoughts of one individual are influenced or determined by the behavior and/or characteristics of others. Students will explore current interpersonal and societal issues and relate how these issues impact performance in the workplace. A seminar component of this course requires students to utilize their evolving knowledge of social psychology to position themselves to enter and advance in their career. Prerequisite: SOSC101/SOSC102 or PHIL201/ PHIL150 PSYC200 PSYCHOLOGY FOR THE DISCIPLINES 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will learn to plan, implement, and manage network and computer security using the most up-to-date attack and defense techniques and technologies. Students will learn to identify and analyze different types of types of attacks and how to defend against them as well as how to harden networks to resist attacks, protect bask and advanced communication, and use cryptography and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) to thwart attackers. SECR210 MICROSOFT SERVERS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will learn to plan, implement, and manage network and computer security using the most up-to-date attack and defense techniques and technologies. Students will learn to identify and analyze different types of types of attacks and how to defend against them as well as how to harden networks to resist attacks, protect bask and advanced communication, and use cryptography and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) to thwart attackers. SECR250 COMPUTER FORENSICS 85 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course features a review of theory and research in social psychology and encourages learners to apply its major principles to situations encountered in everyday life and work. Students investigate the manner in which the behavior, feelings or thoughts of one individual are influenced or determined by the behavior and/or characteristics of others. Students will explore current interpersonal and societal issues and relate how these issues impact performance in the workplace. A seminar component of this course requires students to utilize their evolving knowledge of social psychology to 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will learn how to plan the server environment and how to configure and manage a Windows Server System. Students will demonstrate a solid understanding of basic networking and networking infrastructure, including the use of the OSI model, TCP/IP, and subnets to create logical networks. Students will also learn IP configurations, Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name System (DNS), Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS), IP Security (IPSec), and remote access. Prerequisite: TECH140 SECR220 FIREWALLS AND VPNS 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to become a computer forensics investigator including; how to conduct hightech computer and network investigations, the techniques and tools used to acquire digital evidence, and how to reporting their findings. Students will also learn how to set up forensics labs, how to acquire and work with forensic tools, and digitally analyze evidence. Note: This course will only be offered online. SECR260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE 3 Semester Credit Hours Students will gain in-depth knowledge of designing, setting up, managing, and troubleshooting firewalls and virtual private networks (VPNs) from both a managerial and technical perspective. Students will learn to identify and harden network vulnerabilities, and gain an understanding and ability to manage packet filtering, authentication, proxy servers, encryption, bastion hosts, VPNs, log file maintenance, and intrusion detection systems. 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a professional marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: SOSC215, Final Semester Social Science (SOSC) SOSC101 HUMAN RELATIONS SOSC318 TOPICS IN ETHICS: TECHNOLOGY AND MEDIA 3 Semester Credit Hours Students examine sociological principles to explore the relationship between individuals, attitudes, behaviors, and the community. Students complete a reflection essay and sociological based research paper that is part of the student learning portfolio. SOSC102 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 3 Semester Credit Hours This course provides an examination of the nature of technology and the media. Particular emphasis is placed on present-day ethical problems raised by the ever increasing prevalence of technology and the media in all aspects of life. SOSC330 COMPARATIVE POLITICS Virtual Office Information Management (VOIM) VOIM 110 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE I 3 Semester Credit Hours Students are introduced to sociological principles through exploring the relationship between the individual, attitudes, behavior and the community. This includes the contemplation of issues like race, gender, class, sex, and age, as well as organizational infrastructures and their tendencies towards power, authority, and status. SOSC215 CAREER MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours This course serves as an introduction to the comparative study of political behavior and institutions in various European and Third World countries. The American democratic political system is used as a consistent point of comparison throughout the course. Further, this course illustrates the interrelationship between politics and economics from a comparative perspective, by exploring the philosophical underpinnings of these political systems. 3 Semester Credit Hours Students perform advanced information processing tasks utilizing Microsoft Word. Students will be required to demonstrate mastery level keyboarding skills in an effort to complete a variety of office related tasks utilizing Microsoft Word. Students will learn to create, customize, format, edit and organize a document and data within; insert and format visual content, merge content, review, share and secure documents. Students will be introduced to the use of transcription media and learn basic skills required for transcription. Students will be prepared to take the MCAS (Microsoft Certified Application Specialist) test for Word. Prerequisite: INSM180 VOIM120 21ST CENTURY OFFICE PROCEDURES 3 Semester Credit Hours Employment strategies and career expectations are developed through classroom instruction and simulation using audio and video equipment. Students prepare professional employment tools, in addition to a networking report that is part of the student learning portfolio. Students also investigate opportunities within their chosen career program. Students develop effective interviewing techniques and demonstrate them through completion of a mock interview performed by career professionals. Degree students make arrangements for their Internship experience. Prerequisite: PHIL201 or PHIL150 SOSC301 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP DYNAMICS Technology Courses (TECH) TECH100 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEM PRINCIPLES 3 Semester Credit Hours A foundational course that introduces information systems and its role in business. Students will learn fundamental topics on information system technologies, business applications, systems development, and IT ethics commonly used in business. TECH130 HARDWARE AND OPERATING SYSTEMS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course focuses on the dynamics of groups and interpersonal relationships within the work setting. Small group theory and research form the basis for the study of professional communication and group decision-making skills. Students develop a clearer understanding of their own behavior and how it affects others in the workplace. Prerequisite: SOSC101 or SOSC102 JANUARY 2010 SOSC317 TOPICS IN ETHICS: PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 3 Semester Credit Hours Students learn the purpose of and demonstrate the use of common operating systems utilized in computer hardware. Hands-on experience with a contemporary operating system is emphasized throughout the course. Students also learn to troubleshoot, repair, and replace common hardware and software components. Prerequisite: TECH100 TECH140 NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is an introduction to administrative office management skills utilizing current technology. Emphasis is on providing an historical overview of the roles and responsibilities of executive administration in both a real and virtual environment. Students will utilize information processing simulation and production assignments to demonstrate workplace competencies in the areas of equipment operation, file management, mail systems, phone/telephony telecommunication skills, event planning, travel and conferencing, finance, correspondence, and interpersonal relations. Prerequisites: BUSS100 VOIM210 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE II 3 Semester Credit Hours This course introduces students to the fundamental issues of philosophy, religion, and ethics, with special attention focused on how the contemporary professional can effectively apply philosophical principles in the business arena. 3 Semester Credit Hours Introduces students to common networks and network technologies found in business. Students will uncover the technologies, protocols, media, and topologies used to build and maintain local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and wireless networks. Hands-on experience with the technologies, protocols, media, and concepts covered in the class will be emphasized through the lab portion of TECH 140. Prerequisite: TECH100 3 Semester Credit Hours Students develop proficiency in using desktop publishing and Power Point software to create a variety of business applications. Students will work collaboratively to develop, create, edit and present projects that incorporate the use to technology in developing business solutions. Students will learn how to develop documents incorporating graphics and documents from other software applications for use in designing business applications such as presentations, flyers, brochures, and newsletters. Students will be prepared to take the MCAS (Microsoft Certified Application Specialist) Exam for power point. Prerequisites: VOIM110 86 VOIM220 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE III 3 Semester Credit Hours Students explore the more advanced concepts utilized in spreadsheet and database technology. A continuation of the students' proficiency development using the integrated office suite is accomplished through the application of advanced skills. Students will be prepared to take the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) Exams for Excel and Access. Prerequisites: VOIM120 VOIM230 VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT I workplace competencies and employment standards. Focus is on decision-making, teamwork, communication, time management, and efficient use of office technology in completion of projects. Prerequisites: VOIM220 VOIM330 VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT II work and live? What are the implications for you and for the organizations you will work with? What opportunities and challenges do individuals, news organizations, and businesses face regarding communication, Those who complete this course will know how to use blogs, tags, wikis, social networks productively, and have a framework for understanding and evaluating new social media tools and platforms. VOIM440 MANAGING AN INTERNET BUSINESS 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will be introduced to the fundamentals of virtual communication in the business world including an historical overview. Students will be exposed to the role and function of business network systems, home networks and wireless systems, with an emphasis upon the basic technical skills needed in designing, managing and securing home/small business networks. Students will learn essential business communication and management tools including software applications and personal information managers. Students will learn how individuals use technology to organize their day to day information needs in order to acquire, organize, maintain, retrieve and use information items to fulfill professional responsibilities, specifically with the goal of making the best use of limited resources. Prerequisites: VOIM 110 VOIM260 INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will build upon Virtual communication management I. Students will expand their understanding of what it means to operate in real-time, and assess the implications this will have upon the future of business practices. Students will be trained in the use of software applications to assist with real-time personal and professional management, including telecommunication and video tools as well as be exposed to the future of business communication tools. Students will utilize information processing simulation and production assignments to demonstrate workplace competencies and employment standards. Focus is on decisionmaking, teamwork, communication, time management, and efficient use of office technology in completion of projects Prerequisites: VOIM230 VOIM410 WEB DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours Field experience under the supervision and evaluation of a cooperating facility and the college. Students utilize knowledge and skills gained in the career program for a minimum of 90 clock hours. Students also attend classroom seminars for coordination and evaluation of the Internship experience and the development of a personal marketing plan, which completes the student learning portfolio. Prerequisites: Final Semester VOIM320 OFFICE TECHNOLOGY SOFTWARE IV 3 Semester Credit Hours This course is designed to provide students with the managerial knowledge and skills required to build, maintain and market a functional web site. It will provide students with the knowledge to search and utilize free ware available in the development and creation of the e-business. VOIM420 COMPUTER APPLICATION CRISIS MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours It is impossible to ignore the importance of electronic commerce in the contemporary managerial environment. Electronic commerce lies at the forefront of modern marketing and strategic management, altering the competitive landscape for large and small corporations alike. The Internet and new media are reshaping industries, creating new opportunities, and challenging existing commercial models and relationships. In this course students will gain an understanding of electronic commerce, theories behind ecommerce and marketing. Using a managerial perspective, this course focuses on key issues related to e-commerce including strategy development, competitive advantage, current and emerging technologies, pricing, distribution channels, promotion, and advertising. As a culminating project students will develop an internetbusiness plan and construct an internet based store by identifying a product to sell, finding customers, advertising, setting up the Internet-based store, constructing a warehouse, and establishing a credit payment and delivery system. Prerequisites: VOIM410 VOIM460 PRACTICUM AND CAPSTONE PROJECT 3 Semester Credit Hours The purpose of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the use and benefits of the personal computer, its components, operating system and office suite technology in the business and virtual office environments. Students will utilize Microsoft office suite 2007 technology including Microsoft word, excel, access, power point, desktop publishing and photo editing to design, edit, and produce integrated reports and projects. Students will utilize information processing simulation and production assignments to demonstrate VOIM430 VIRTUAL AND SOCIAL DIGITAL NETWORKING MANAGEMENT 3 Semester Credit Hours The course will explore the new social media landscape in terms of online expression, social networking, identity management, community building, and citizen journalism. How is social media changing the way you 87 JANUARY 2010 3 Semester Credit Hours This course will provide students with an in depth overview of all the functions and features of installing, configuring, and maintaining an operating system and office suite application software on a computer. Students learn troubleshooting solutions to common problems while supporting users of integrated office applications in either a virtual office setting or corporate setting. Students will also be tooled with the skills needed to troubleshoot internet and web based applications. Prerequisites: VOIM330 3 Semester Credit Hours In this course students will design, execute and present the outcomes of a capstone project conducted during a practicum field experience. Students will be challenged to use their knowledge, skills and behaviors developed over the course of their program studies to solve real-world problems in their career discipline. Students will be evaluated from both academic and professional standards. The capstone project will be a portfolio development exhibit. Prerequisites: Final Semester Fraud Prevention The College has established a fraud prevention effort. To ensure fraud prevention a member of our Board of Directors, Mr. Gary Brost, will serve as the College's operationally independent point of contact for the reporting of fraudulent acts. Mr. Brost may be contacted via email at [email protected] The Officers of Bryant & Stratton College, Inc. and its subsidiaries: JOHN J. STASCHAK, C.P.A., M.B.A., B.S. President and Chief Executive Officer FRANCIS J. FELSER, D.M., C.P.A., M.B.A., B.S. Executive Vice President/Chief Financial Officer Secretary/Treasurer DOREEN A. JUSTINGER, M.B.A., B.S. Vice President/Internet Services JOHN J. MITCHELL, M.S., B.S. Vice President/Professional Skills Center TRACY B. NANNERY, M.B.A., B.S. Vice President/Admissions Organization Bryant & Stratton College is an independent coeducational postsecondary education institution. The campuses in New York and Ohio are incorporated under the laws of the state of New York. The College also operates campuses in the State of Virginia under the subsidiary of Bryant & Stratton College Corporation and campuses in the state of Wisconsin under the subsidiary of Stratton Educational Corporation. The System Office is located in Getzville, New York. The following serve as the Directors and Officers of Bryant & Stratton College, Inc. and its subsidiaries: BETH A. TARQUINO, M.S. Ed, B.A. Vice President/Chief Academic Officer ERNEST LEHMAN, B.S. Vice President/Chief Information Officer The Board of Directors of Bryant & Stratton College, Inc. and its subsidiaries: BRYANT H. PRENTICE, III Buffalo, NY Chairman of the Board, Bryant & Stratton College, Inc. DAVID J. AMENT Boston, MA Managing Partner, Parthenon Capital ALEX G. BRNILOVICH, JR. Naperville, IL President, Xcligent GARY M. BROST Buffalo, NY President, Strategic Investments & Holdings, Inc. DR. KENNETH C. GRAY State College, PA Professor Emeritus, Pennsylvania State University JOHN C. RUTHERFORD Boston, MA Managing Partner, Parthenon Capital 88 JANUARY 2010 Bryant & Stratton College Faculty & Staff Listings Staff & Faculty NEW YORK Albany ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Michael Gutierrez Campus Director M.B.A., Webster University B.S., The College of Saint Rose Robert Ferrell Director of Admissions M.B.A., Ellis College B.S., State University of New York Empire State College David Denofio Dean of Instruction M.S., B.S., State University of New York at Albany Amy Mori Dean of Student Services M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., Western Michigan University Gina Cassidy Director of Career Services M.A., Webster University B.S., Coastal Carolina University Loraine Dragon Business Office Director & Human Resources Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Bryan Gregory Director of Professional Skills Center B.S., The College of Saint Rose Betty Koska Reports Coordinator A.O.S., Albany Business College Muhammad Aejaz Admissions Representative B.A., Mathura College Renee Belardo Senior High School Coordinator AAS, Hudson Valley Community College Tricia Bliss Admissions Office Coordinator Kristina Bowen Career Services Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Stelianos Canallatos Academic Advisor M.A., B.A., State University of New York College at Plattsburgh Lyn Chiera Financial Services Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Gabriel Clevenger PSC Financial Services Account Executive A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Suheil DeJesus Assistant to the Dean & Campus Event Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Carla Donnini PSC Healthcare Account Executive B.S., Siena College Mark Dowling IT Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Joshua Figueroa Career Services Coordinator M.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Potsdam MacKenzie Gardner High School Admissions Representative A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Harry Grace Academic Advisor B.A., Southern Vermont College Victoria Hernick PSC Operations Manager M.Ed., Jones International University B.B.A., Sage College of Albany Peter Jones Academic Advisor AAS, Hudson Valley Community College Maryann Kuranovich Financial Services Advisor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Brenda Lorenzo Financial Services Advisor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Heather Lovell Admissions Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Michael Markou Associate Dean of Student Services B.S., State University of New York College at Oneonta Lisa Miller Financial Services Advisor AAS, Hudson Valley Community College Kelly Mooney Associate Director of High School Relations A.S., Cazenovia College Zachary Patterson Admissions Representative B.A., The College of Saint Rose Susan A. Peak Learning Resources Coordinator B.S., The College of Saint Rose Jacqueline Rivers Financial Services Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Stephanie Ruotolo Registrar A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Luz Santiago Assistant to the Dean of Instruction A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kristee Schuttig PSC Account Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Latanya Sellie PSC Account Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Erika Zalucki Senior Admissions Representative AAS, Hudson Valley Community College JANUARY 2010 FACULTY Patricia Aikens M.P.A., Russell Sage College B.P.S., State University of New York at Utica/Rome Mary Andrus M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.A., The College of New Jersey Peter Andrus M.D., Albany Medical College of Union University B.A., John Hopkins University John Armitage M.A., Hofstra University B.S., State University of New York at Albany 90 * Denotes Full-Time Linda Armitage M.S., The Sage Colleges B.S., State University of New York at Albany Michael Baggetta M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Joseph Belardo M.S., University of Phoenix B.S., American Intercontinental University Dominick Belli M.B.A., B.S., Capella University Margarete Beneby M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Albany Jeffrey Bianchine M.B.A., B.S., Syracuse University Joseph Borowiec M.B.A., M.S., B.S., Union College Edward Breen J.D., Albany Law School of Union University B.S., State University of New York College at Oneonta Patricia Bruno M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.A., The College of Saint Rose George Burns J.D., Fordham University Law School M.B.A., B.A., Fordham University Joseph Cannistraci* M.A., B.A., State University of New York at Albany Veronica Ciccarelli M.P.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Russell Sage College Thomas Cirillo* M.S., State University of New York College at Potsdam B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Glenn Clairmont M.S., Russell Sage College B.A., State University of New York at Albany Raymond Coco M.A., State University of New York at Geneseo B.S., Union College Charles Cook* M.S., B.S., The College of Saint Rose Carol Cusano* M.L.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., The College of Saint Rose Stephen DiBiase M.S., University of Bridgeport B.A., State University of New York at Albany Colleen Dillon* M.S., University at Albany B.S., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Denise Dreany M.S., State University of New York at Albany Victor Fernandez* M.S., Cansisus College B.S., Empire State College Michael Fraser* Psy.D., Southern California University M.S., Fordham University B.A., Mount Saint Mary College Judy Harris* M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.A., State University College at Oswego Eileen Mary Howe M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute B.S., State University College at Oswego Michelle Hunt M.S., Drexel University B.S., Russell Sage College Gerald Hynes M.A., State University of New York Empire State College B.B.A., St. Bonaventure University Leyla Kiosse J.D., Albany Law School of Union University B.A., Union College Frederick Kirch M.B.A., George Washington University B.B.A., Siena College Mark Lasek* M.L.S., M.P.H., State University of New York at Albany B.S., State University of New York at Plattsburgh Eileen Leary-Kelly Ph.D., Greenwich University M.A., Goddard College B.A., The College of Saint Rose Brian Logan* J.D., Albany Law School B.A., State University of New York College at New Paltz John Lubowitz M.S., The Sage Colleges B.A., University of Rochester Thomas Maguire* M.B.A., State University of New York at Albany B.A., State University of New York College at Plattsburgh Julieanne Maloney M.S., Hofstra University B.A., State University of New York at Albany Brian Massman M.F.A., B.A., University of Montana James McDonald* M.B.A., Pace University B.B.A., University of Notre Dame Jasper Mills J.D., Albany Law School B.S., Union College Ghazala Nathu M.D., Eugenio Maria de Hostos University M.S., Sage Graduate School Maqsood Nathu* M.D., B.S.C., Unirhmos School of Medicine Holloway, University of London, UK Kathryn Nuding J.D., University of Southern California B.A., State University of New York at Albany Juliane O'Brien J.D., Albany Law School of Union University M.A., B.A., University at Albany Lucinda Olmstead* M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.A., Barrington College Valerie Palmieri-Smith M.S., The College of Saint Rose B.A., University at Albany Seth Pase* M.A., Union College B.A., Emerson College Julian Porter, CCMA B.S., Union College Mia Puertas M.A., University at Albany B.S., Sage College of Albany Erica Putnam J.D., Albany Law School of Union University B.A., Marist College Rachel Rappazzo* J.D., Albany Law School of Union University B.A., State University of New York at Albany Darhon Rees-Rohrbacher M.A., Ohio State University B.M., Capital University Linda Rozell-Shannon Ph.D., Walden University M.S., The Sage Colleges B.S., The College of Saint Rose Lisa Rubilar M.F.A., Union Institute & University B.A., Brigham Young University Laura Schindler M.S., Union College B.A., Siena College Miranda Siek M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., Hartwick College Michael Skiba M.B.A., State University of New York at Albany B.A., The College of Saint Rose Nancy Smulsky M.S., Excelsior College B.P.S., State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica-Rome Laura Soldani M.A.E., University of Phoenix B.P.S., Bellevue University Cheryl Stier M.S., University of Rochester B.S., Trenton State College Kendra Stringfellow M.M., B.S., University of Phoenix Ryan Taylor M.P.A., State University of New York at Albany B.A., Western Illinois University D. Ross Thomson* Ph.D., Buxton University M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Deborah Tremblay M.S., Nova Southeastern University B.S., The Sage Colleges Nelson Vandenburgh Jr. M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., State University of New York Empire State College Jeffrey Yates M.B.A., Union College B.S., Siena College NEW YORK Amherst ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Jeffrey P. Tredo Director of Western New York Colleges B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Marvel Ross-Jones Campus Director Ph.D., M.Ed., C.A.S., State University of New York at Buffalo M.B.A., B.A., Canisius College Judy Moran Administrative Assistant to Campus Director Diploma, Bryant & Stratton College Janice Y. Ferguson WNY Dean of Academics Ed. M., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Howard University Cathy Oddo Associate Dean of Student Services M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Medaille College Melany Shields WNY Market Registrar M.S., Canisius College B.S., D'Youville College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Samantha Delaney Administrative Assistant to WNY Registrar AAS, Erie Community College Marc LoGrasso WNY BBA Faculty/Administration Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Robert Kociecki WNY BBA Financial Aid Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College A.O.S., Erie Community College Michael Morin Librarian M.F.A., M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo David A. Lewis Librarian M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Juan Martinez Academic Advisor/ADA Coordinator M.S ED, State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Brittany Cozad Academic Advisor B.A., Daemen College Ed.M, State University of New York at Buffalo Lynn Sparkes Academic Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Serena H. D'Amato WNY BBA Academic Administrative Assistant B.S., Medaille College Brian Dioguardi Director of Admissions B.A., St. John Fisher Ann Marie Galla Admissions Office Manager Lisa Jacobs Receptionist A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Burnise Betterson Receptionist Noreen Guerinot Admissions Representative BBA, Medaille College AAS, Niagara Community College Adrian McQueen Admissions Representative B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Kevin Danwin High School Coordinator AAS, Niagara County Community College Scott Airey High School Representative B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College John Colocousis Career Services Director M.S., B.A., Boston College Diane Czaplicki Career Services Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Sue Franclemont WNY Communications Coordinator Kathy Owczarczak WNY Business Office Director B.S., Canisius College Lori Martynowicz WNY Bursar M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.A., Canisius College Judith Beitz, CBP Financial Services Manager A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kate Hazen Financial Services Advisor B.A. State University of New York at Buffalo Archana Sakpal Business Office Assistant B.S., State University of New York College at Fredonia 91 JANUARY 2010 Brad Nutty WNY Information Technology Manager A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Keith Barry Technology Coordinator A.A.S ITT Technical Institute Richard Bateman WNY Facilities Manager B.P.S., State University of New York Empire State College Christopher J. Janson Maintenance, Days B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College Lindsay Hornburg Admissions Representative A.A.S. The Boyd School Darian Lovejoy Admissions Representative FACULTY Nicole A. Alonzo M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo M.B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Hiram College Schuyler Banks M.B.A., Medaille College B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Tara Bennett M.B.A., Canisius College B.A.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Laurel Berry* M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Cheryl Berzer J.D. State University of New York at Buffalo Law School Christian Blum Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania M.A. State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A. Canisius College Deborah Boron M.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Michael Caputi* M.S., Canisius College B.S., Medaille College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College William Chapman M.S., B.A., Daemen College Latricia Chisholm M.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A., Erie Community College Guy Cosentino M.S. University of Phoenix B.S., Penn State University A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Joseph Delphonse M.A.H., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Shevaun Donelli M.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Beth Downing B.S. Empire State College Diane Fildes M.S.Ed., Canisius College B.S. Rosary Hill College 92 JANUARY 2010 Jeffrey Fineberg M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo John Grace M.S., B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Penny Janson M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Paul Grzybowski* M.S., Syracuse University B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Theresa Hopkins M.B.A., Medaille College B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Amelia Joyce* M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo AAS, Niagara County Community College Evelyn Kerney Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo M.B.A., Medaille College M.S., B.A., Canisius College Hal Kingsley M.B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo M.A., Emerson College B.A., Long Island University Lorin Kostecky B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Deborah Landowski Ph.D., State University of New York College at Buffalo MLS, State University of New York College at Geneseo B.A., Houghton College G. James Lankes, Jr. M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Daemen College AAS, Erie Community College David A. Lewis* M.L.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Marc LoGrasso* Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Janie MacDonald* M.S., B.A., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Charlene Mahony B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo John McFadden B.A., St. John Vianney College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Ernest McPeek J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Michael Morin M.F.A., M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Patrick Mullins B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo AAS, Mohawk Valley Community College James O'Donnell M.B.A., B.S., Canisius College Colleen Orcutt B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Jeffrey Owczarczak M.B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Daniel Pratt M.A., Niagara University B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo David Quackenbush M.S.Ed., B.S., Canisius College John Reinholz M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Houghton College April Sanders M.B.A., Medaille College B.A., Canisius College David Sarkovics J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law M.S.Ed., B.A., Canisius College William C. Schenk, IV M.B.A., B.A., B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Andreas Schumacher M.B.A., Westfaelische Wilhelms University B.A., Westfaelische Wilhelms University Margaret Schwabel* M.S., St. Francis College B.S., Canisius College CMA (AAMA) Charlene Shotwell M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A., Niagara County Community College Dale Stephens M.A., B.S., Medaille College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Manzoor H. Syed* M.S., Aligarh University, India B.S., University of Jammu & Kashmir, India B.P.S., State University of New York Empire State College Diane Tulumello M.B.A., Canisius College Barbara Wenke* M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Oregon State University Deidra Whiteside M.B.A., Medaille College B.S., State University of New York Empire State College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Jason Wimble M.S., Canisius College B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo * Denotes Full-Time NEW YORK Buffalo ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Jeffrey P. Tredo Director of Western New York Colleges B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Judy Moran Administrative Assistant to Campus Director Diploma, Bryant & Stratton College Janice Y. Ferguson WNY Dean of Academics M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Howard University Adiam Tsegai Dean of Instruction Ph.D., M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo A.A.S, Erie Community College Andrew Annesi Associate Dean of Student Services M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Niagara University Johanna Armstrong* Medical Assisting Program Director M.S, Ed., B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport AAS, Erie Community College Christian Blum* Liberal Arts Program Administrator Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania M.A., State University of New York of Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Penny R. Janson Career Core Program Administrator M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo John Reinholz* Criminal Justice Program Administrator M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Houghton College Marc LoGrasso WNY BBA Program Administrator Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Melany A. Shields Registrar - WNY Market M.S., Canisius College B.S., D'Youville College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Samantha Delaney Administrative Assistant to WNY Registrar A.A.S., Erie Community College Amelia Joyce Librarian M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A.S, Niagara County Community College Christopher Dale Librarian M.L.S., State University of New York B.A., Kenyon College Gail Jonas Academic Advisor M.A., State University of New York at Empire State College B.S., Medaille College Michael Miller Academic Advisor M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Carolyn Coles Benton Academic Advisor, ADA Coordinator V.A. Certifying Official Representative M.S.W., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Grambling State University Christopher S. Kovacs Academic Advisor M.A., Medaille College B.A., Medaille College Angela R. Jackson Academic Advisor M.A., SUNY of Fredonia B.A., SUNY of Fredonia Gloria Borynski, CBP Academic Administrative Assistant B.B.A., Bryant & Stratton College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Robert D. Whiting Academic Administrator B.S. Grambling State University Phil Struebel Director of Admissions M.A., Medaille College B.A., Canisius College BBA, Medaille College Mary Beth Brown Admissions Office Manager A.A.S, Villa Maria College Lynn Becker Admissions Representative Heather Davidson Admissions Representative B.S., John Carroll University Kevin Ernst Admissions Representative B.S. SUNY Empire State College Joseph Saad Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Roxanne Young Admissions Representative B.S., Buffalo State College Renate Bojic Admissions Representative A.O.S., Ashford College Fayvoyan Mosley High School Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Ch'aszie Thagard Day Receptionist A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Jacqueline Brice Evening Receptionist B.A., Buffalo State College Diane Westbrook Career Services Director M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Daemen College Sue Franclemont WNY Communications Coordinator Kathy Owczarczak WNY Business Office Director B.S., Canisius College Lori Martynowicz WNY Bursar M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.A., Canisius College Joseph Kazimir Business Office Assistant B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Luanne Brown WNY Financial Aid Technical Administrator James Ayers Financial Services Manager B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Marloe Jordan, CBP Financial Services Advisor BBA, A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Laura Phan, CBP Financial Services Advisor AAS, Erie Community College Deborah Critoph Financial Services Advisor AAS, Hilbert College Brad Nutty, CBP WNY Information Technology Manager B.B.A., Bryant & Stratton College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Richard Bateman WNY Facilities Manager B.P.S., State University of New York Empire State College FACULTY George B. Alexander M.S. State University College of Buffalo B.S., Medaille College Johanna Armstrong* M.S, Ed., B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport AAS, Erie Community College William Battle M.S., University of Maryland B.A., Canisius College Heather Bidell M.A., State University College of Buffalo Christian Blum* P.h.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania M.A., State University of New York of Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Woody Brandy M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Laurel Berry* M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Kevin Black M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Sean Carr J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., D'Youville College Michele Chappell B. S., Medaille College Latricia Chisholm M.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A., Erie Community College Gwen Collier M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Daniel Culver M.S., University of Cincinnati B.A., State University of New York at Empire State College William C. Curtin* J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Law B.S., Canisius College, Buffalo, New York Christopher Dale* M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Kenyon College Nina Davis M.A., Sage Colleges B.A., Dillard University Jennie Dehn* M.B.A., Medaille College Ed.B. AAS, State University of New York at Buffalo Laura DePasquale* M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Salvatore DiGaudio B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.S., Southwestern Community College 93 JANUARY 2010 Phyllis Donovan* M.S.Ed., Canisius College B.S., Medaille College Penny R. Janson M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo James Jennings-Wyckoff M.A., University of South Florida Amelia Joyce* M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo AAS, Niagara County Community College Daniel Kaczmarek M.A., University of North Carolina Greensboro M.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York at Fredonia James Kowalski* B.A., St. John Fisher College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Marc LoGrasso* Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Charlene Mahoney B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Lucy Marecki* M.S., Niagara University B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo AAS, Niagara County Community College Melissa Martin Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo Paul Martello M.Ed., Canisius College B.A., Catholic University of America A.A., St. Joseph's Seraphic College Erin M. McCarthy M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B. S., Criminal Justice, State University of New York, Empire State College John McFadden* B.A., St. John Vianney College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Colleen Orcutt* B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Jeffrey Owczarczak M.B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Melvin Parker J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo M.S., Canisius College M.A., Florida A&M B.S., Johnson Smith University David Paluch M.A., Criminal Justice, University of Albany Susan Penfold* M.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York at Brockport John Reinholz* M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Houghton College David Ray M.S., Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati April Sanders M.B.A., Medaille College B.A., Canisius College Christopher J. Schneider M.A., Canisius College B.A., Hobart College Lorraine Stahl B.S., Daemen College Natalie L. Stoyanoff M.B.A., Saint Bonaventure University B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Shana Williams M.A., State University of New York at Buffalo * Denotes Full-Time Jason Wimble M.S., Canisius College B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Charles Wonch M.B.A., B.S. Medaille College Heidi Young* M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Oswego State College NEW YORK Greece ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Marc D. Ambrosi Campus Director M.B.A., University of Rochester, Simon School B.S., Purdue University Marie A. D'Alessandro Business Office Director B.S., State University of New York Regents College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kelly K. Henry Career Services Director M.S., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology David J. Profita Director of Admissions B.S., Columbia College Annalinda P. Ragazzo Market Academic Dean J.D., St. John's University School of Law B.A., College of New Rochelle Maria F. Scalise Market Director of Admissions B.S., Ithaca College John C. Schifano Associate Director of Admissions B.A., Medaille College A.S., Monroe Community College Derek A. Thomson Dean of Student Services J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law M.S., State University of New York College at Brockport B.A., State University of New York College at Geneseo Vanda Andel Senior Financial Services Counselor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Joann Barbero Financial Aid Supervisor B.S., State University of New York College at Fredonia Jamie S. Blaszkowiak Admissions Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College JoAnne L. Buschang Administrative Assistant/Human Resource Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Alexander Braun Facilities Kimberly M. Diederich Administrative Assistant A.S., Rochester Business Institute Nicole A. Ellsworth Business Office Coordinator B.A., State University of New York Empire State College A.S., Monroe Community College Angel Gonzalez Admissions Representative B.A., State University of New York at Cortland A.S., Monroe Community College Skelly A. Jeffery Student Advisor/Learning Center Coordinator M.S., B.S., Canisius College Melissa D. Kamens RCSD Partnership/Resource Center Coordinator M.S., B.S., St. John Fisher College Utku Kanik Market Technology Manager Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of New York M.S., B.S., Middle East Technical University Kathy A. O'Neill Business Office Assistant A.A.S., Monroe Community College Raymond M. Otto High School Admissions Representative Nicole E. Pierson First Term Academic Advisor M.S., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Sharron L. Peet Academic Advisor M.S., State University of New York College at Brockport B.E., State University of New York Maritime College Carol A. Phillips Librarian M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Geneseo Sandra Sankovic-Bauer Career Services Representative M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Marie A. Serafine Receptionist A.O.S., Rochester Business Institute Iris Sierra Financial Services Counselor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Katherine M. Stephens Admissions Representative B.S., University of South Carolina Laura A. Stradley Military Coordinator M.B.A, B.B.A., Baker College FACULTY Ginger Alloco M.S., B.A., Nazareth College Delishia Anderson C.A.S., in Educational Administration M.B.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Jean Arlauckas* M.S., B.S., California College for Health Sciences Barbara E. Aurnou* M.S., Nazareth College B.A., Queens College Michele M. Barnard DeCann M.S. Candidate, Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Shirley Burritt B.S., State University of New York at Brockport A.A.S., State University of New York at Canton Todd Buzard M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.S., Utica College of Syracuse University Tina Cabisca M.M.M., University of Rochester, Simon School B.N., St. John Fisher College Roxanne M. Carr* M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.A., University of Rochester 94 JANUARY 2010 Kelly Cary* B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Bruce Conrad-Reingold M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Paul D. Coles M.S., Syracuse University B.S., Eckerd College A.S., Community College of the Air Force A.A., St. Petersburg Junior College Kenneth Corpus B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology James DelVecchio M.S., Roberts Wesleyan College B.S., Empire State College Matthew DuBois M.A., State University of New York at Empire State B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Phyllis Durrant* B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Ellen Eccleston B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Daniel A. Ercolano M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., University of Dayton Marjorie Focarazzo M.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College A.A.S., Monroe Community College Nicole Frost M.S., B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Cathy Gaesser M.S., Roberts Wesleyan College B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology A.A.S., State University of New York at Buffalo A.A.S., Finger Lakes Community College Yaritza Gandulla-Alvarez B.S.N., University of Puerto Rico Barbara F. Gombetto* B.S., Nazareth College Helen Gulack M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., Nazareth College Karen Gushue M.B.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Pam Hill M.A., B.A., State University of New York College at Brockport Jason Hoge J.D., City University of New York School of Law B.A., State University of New York at Purchase College Judith R. Hunley* M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Bloomsburg University Yolanda Johnson M.S., Roberts Wesleyan College B.A., Livingstone College Donald Kelly M.S., B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo John Kralles M.S., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Tanya Kuzylak M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Salvatore Lanzafame* M.A., Nazareth College B.S., Le Moyne College Laura MacLemale M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute M.A., State University of New York at Brockport B.A., State University of New York at Albany Joy Marsh M.A., Northern Arizona University B.A., Grand Canyon University Mary E. Mills* B.A., Mercyhurst College Scott W. Mitchell* M.F.A., B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology Catherine C. Mortimer Ed.M., B.S., University of Rochester A.S., Monroe Community College Robert R. Novick B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology A.A.S., Monroe Community College Karen C. Parysek* M.S., Nazareth College B.S., University of Rochester A.A.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Alfred Sharron L. Peet* M.S., State University of New York College at Brockport B.E., State University of New York Maritime College Christine Pospisil M.S., B.S., Queens College A.A., Manhattan Community College John Price M.D., Reformed Baptist Seminary B.S., Renssalear Polytechnic Institute Kathy Revekant M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., St. John Fisher Janet O. Ritchie M.S.E., Long Island University B.A., Alfred University Sandra Sankovic-Bauer* M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Karen Schwartzman M.B.A., St. John Fisher College B.A., State University of New York College at Plattsburg Carol Stafford M.S., Nazareth College B.S., St. John Fisher College Laura A. Stradley* M.B.A, B.B.A., Baker College Christine Stymus* M.S., Troy State University B.S., Bluefield College Andrew D. Szalasny B.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Kara Trosinski M.S., Roberts Wesleyan B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Michael E. Trowbridge* M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport A.A.S., Genesee Community College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Richard Trowbridge Ph.D., Union Institute and University M.A., Norwich University B.A., State University of New York Empire State College Emma Waller M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Kenneth Wofford M.S., Purdue University B.S., Widener University Andrew M. Wyner* Ph.D., M.S., B.S., University of Toronto M.B.A., York University Karen C. Zempel* M.S., St. John Fisher College B.A., University of Windsor NEW YORK Henrietta ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Marc D. Ambrosi Campus Director M.B.A., University of Rochester, Simon School B.S., Purdue University Marie A. D'Alessandro Business Office Director B.S., State University of New York Regents College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kelly K. Henry Career Services Director M.S., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Timothy A. McCardle Director of PSC B.S., Penn State University David J. Profita Director of Admissions B.S., Columbia College Annalinda P. Ragazzo Market Academic Dean J.D., St. John's University School of Law B.A., College of New Rochelle Maria F. Scalise Market Director of Admissions B.S., Ithaca College John C. Schifano Associate Director of Admissions B.A., Medaille College A.S., Monroe Community College Derek A. Thomson Dean of Student Services J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law M.A., State University of New York College at Brockport B.A., State University of New York College at Geneseo Lin S. Applegarth Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Joann Barbero Financial Aid Supervisor B.S., State University of New York College at Fredonia JoAnne L. Buschang Administrative Assistant/Human Resource Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Alec L. Drummond PSC Financial Services Account Executive B.A., Wittenberg University Melissa A. Elliott-Stringham High School Coordinator A.A.S., Finger Lakes Community College George M. Fawcett Master Admissions Representative A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Meggan B. Fitch Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Beverly S. Hallett Receptionist Ryan C. Hill Campus Custodian A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Melissa D. Kamens RCSD Partnership/Resource Center Coordinator M.S., B.S., St. John Fisher College Utku Kanik Market Technology Manager Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of New York M.S., B.S., Middle East Technical University 95 JANUARY 2010 Katie M. Kloepfer Admissions Representative M.B.A., Alvernia College B.S.W., Shippersberg University Marilyn L. Krouth Financial Services Counselor Shana R. Leo High School Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York at Cortland Dawn M. Luttrell Student Advisor/Learning Center Coordinator M.S., University of Rochester B.S., New York Institute of Technology A.A., Nassau Community College Chari A. Marcello Administrative Office Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Megan McQuaid-Smith PSC Account Executive B.S., B.A., Slippery Rock University Lyndsey M. Muscato Academic Advisor M.B.A., Colorado Technical University B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Kathryn M. Pizzo PSC Coordinator B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Jane L. Rowlands Career Services Representative M.A., Medaille College B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo Margot R. Schutte PSC Technology Coordinator M.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., Purdue University Laura J. Shultis Financial Services Counselor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Amy L. Stockdale Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Laura A. Stradley Military Coordinator M.B.A, B.B.A., Baker College Kim M. Tomczak-Catalanello Librarian M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., St. John Fisher College Christie M. Wall Admissions Representative B.A., State University of New York at Brockport Lance C. Whitbeck Financial Services Counselor A.S., Monroe Community College Diane C. White Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kyle A. Wright Admissions Representative B.S., Tennessee State University FACULTY Ginger Alloco M.S., B.A., Nazareth College Delishia Anderson C.A.S., in Educational Administration M.B.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Augustine Anih M.L.T., American Society of Pathologists B.S., Rochester Institute of Rochester * Denotes Full-Time 96 Jean Arlauckas* M.S., B.S., California College for Health Sciences Barbara E. Aurnou* M.S., Nazareth College B.A., Queens College Charles Bardeen* M.P.A., Marist College B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology A.A.S., Finger Lakes Community College Michele M. Barnard DeCann M.S. Candidate, Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Michael Begay M.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.F.A., University of Massachusetts Lowell Peter Botsis M.S.T., Rochester Institute of Technology B.P.S., State University of New York Empire State College Joseph Brognano M.A., University of Rochester B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo Shirley Burritt B.S., State University of New York at Brockport A.A.S., State University of New York at Canton Todd Buzard M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.S., Utica College of Syracuse University Roxanne M. Carr* M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.A., University of Rochester Kelly Cary* B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Paul D. Coles M.S., Syracuse University B.S., Eckerd College A.S., Community College of the Air Force A.A., St. Petersburg Junior College Bruce Conrad-Reingold M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Ken Corpus B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology James DelVecchio M.S., Roberts Wesleyan College B.S., Empire State College Matthew DuBois M.A., State University of New York at Empire State B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Phyllis Durrant* B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Ellen Eccleston B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Daniel Ercolano M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., University of Dayton Marjorie Focarazzo M.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College A.A.S., Monroe Community College Cathy Gaesser B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology A.A.S., State University of New York at Buffalo A.A.S., Finger Lakes Community College Rachael Galus M.S., Canisus College B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Yaritza Gandulla-Alvarez B.S.N., University of Puerto Rico Barbara F. Gombetto* B.S., Nazareth College Brett Granville J.D., University of Notre Dame B.B.A., St. Bonaventure University Karen Gushue M.B.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Pam Hill M.A., B.A., State University of New York College at Brockport Jason Hoge J.D., City University of New York School of Law B.A., State University of New York at Purchase College Stephen R. Holmes M.B.A., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., St. John Fisher College Judith R. Hunley* M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Bloomsburg University Yolanda Johnson M.S., Roberts Wesleyan College B.A., Livingstone College Donald Kelly M.S., B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo Jill Kinsella M.S., State University of New York at Brockport B.A., Siena College Christopher Kotary J.D., Syracuse University College of Law M.B.A., Syracuse University John Kralles M.S., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Tanya Kuzylak M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Salvatore Lanzafame* M.A., Nazareth College B.S., Le Moyne College Michael Leone J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Dawn M. Luttrell* M.S., University of Rochester B.S., New York Institute of Technology A.A., Nassau Community College Laura MacLemale M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute M.A., State University of New York at Brockport B.A., State University of New York at Albany Mark Malone M.B.A., Shenandoah University M.I.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Joseph Manza D.C., New York Chiropractic College B.S., State University of New York at Fredonia Robin Marable J.D., Pennsylvania State University B.A., University of Virginia Charles Miller* B.S., State University of New York Regents College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Mary E. Mills* B.A., Mercyhurst College Scott W. Mitchell* M.F.A., B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology Catherine C. Mortimer Ed.M., B.S., University of Rochester A.S., Monroe Community College Kelly Mullaney M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Lyndsey M. Muscato* M.B.A., Colorado Technical University B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Robert R. Novick B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology A.A.S., Monroe Community College JANUARY 2010 Karen C. Parysek* M.S., Nazareth College B.S., University of Rochester A.A.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Alfred Christine Pospisil M.S., B.S., Queens College A.A., Manhattan Community College Colleen Powderly M.A., B.A., B.S., State University of New York at Brockport John Price M.D., Reformed Baptist Seminary B.S., Renssalear Polytechnic Institute Kathy Revekant M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., St. John Fisher Janet O. Ritchie M.S.E., Long Island University B.A., Alfred University Jane L. Rowlands* M.A., Medaille College B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo Kenneth Ruschak Ph.D., University of Minnesota B.S., State University of New York at Plattsburgh A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Karen Schwartzman M.B.A., St. John Fisher College B.A., State University of New York College at Plattsburg Christine Stymus* M.S., Troy State University B.S., Bluefield College Janine M. Susz* B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology Kathleen Sutherland M.S., Nazareth College B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Victor Sylor* M.S., University of Cincinnati B.S., Houghton College Andrew D. Szalasny B.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Kara Trosinski M.S., Roberts Wesleyan B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Michael E. Trowbridge* M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport A.A.S., Genesee Community College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Richard Trowbridge Ph.D., Union Institute and University M.A., Norwich University B.A., State University of New York Empire State College Barbara M. Tschiderer M.S.Ed., Nazareth College B.A., St. John Fisher College A.S., Monroe Community College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Robin Unwin* J.D., University of Arkansas School of Law B.A., Miami University Emma Waller M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Maria Washington M.B.A., University of Rochester Simon School B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Kirsten White M.S., B.A., Nazareth College Kenneth Wofford M.S., Purdue University B.S., Widener University Andrew M. Wyner* Ph.D., M.S., B.S., University of Toronto M.B.A., York University Karen C. Zempel* M.S., St. John Fisher College B.A., University of Windsor NEW YORK Southtowns ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Jeffrey P. Tredo Director of Western New York Colleges B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Paul C. Bahr Campus Director M.B.A., Monmouth University B.A., Richard Stockton College of New Jersey Judy Moran Administrative Assistant to Campus Director Diploma, Bryant & Stratton College Janice Y. Ferguson Western New York Dean of Academics Ed.M.S, State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Howard University James A. Wesolowski Dean of Instruction M.A., M.B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A.S., Erie Community College Sara J. Reese Associate Dean of Student Services M.S.Ed., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Fredonia A.A.S., Erie Community College Melany A. Shields Registrar - WNY Market M.S., Canisius College B.S., D'Youville College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Samantha Delaney Administrative Assistant to WNY Registrar A.A.S., Erie Community College Susan Smith Librarian M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Patricia A. Sedor Librarian M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Lindsay Mang Student Services Coordinator/ADA Coordinator M.S., Canisius College B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Michelle Grzechowiak Academic Advisor M.A. MedailleCollege B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Cynthia Karanik Academic Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Ken Monaco WNY High School Services Coordinator B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Gena Hoch Admissions Coordinator/Veterans Certifying Official B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Jennifer Russell Senior Admissions Representative B.S., University of South Florida A.A., Hillsboro Community College A.S., New Hampshire Technical Community College Kristen Cooper Admissions Representative A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Tracy Dominiak Admission Representative A.S., Niagara County Community College Stephen Makosy Career Services Director A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Diane Czaplicki Career Services Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Sue Franclemont Western New York Communications Coordinator Kathy Owczarczak Western New York Business Office Director B.S., Canisius College Lori Martynowicz Western New York Bursar M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.A., Canisius College Tiffany Hartwig Business Office Assistant B.S., Canisius College Luanne Brown WNY Financial Aid Technical Administrator Kristi Duffy Financial Services Manager B.A., Daemen College Tracy Seifert Financial Services Advisor M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Cortland Brad Nutty Western New York Information Technology Manager B.B.A., Bryant & Stratton College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Richard Bateman WNY Facilities Manager B.P.S., State University of New York Empire State College Gary Braman Day Maintenance Barbara Schick Receptionist, Day Division Steve Dlugosz Weekend Receptionist Johanna Armstrong CMA Allied Health Program Director/Faculty M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport A.A.S, Erie Community College Christian Blum Liberal Arts Program Administrator/Faculty Ph.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania M.A., State University College at Buffalo B.A., Canisius Steve Ethridge Director of Admissions B.S. Alameda university Laura Ference Financial Services Advisor B.S., Nazareth College Penny R. Janson Career Core Program Administrator/Faculty M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo New York State Teaching Certification 97 JANUARY 2010 Scott Jaskier Admissions Representative Caitlin Mulchay Receptionist, Evening Division A.A.S., Genesee Community College John M. Reinholz Criminal Justice Program Administrator/Faculty M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., Houghton College FACULTY Sandra Bisesi ED.M., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Shannon M. Bixby M.B.A., Medaille College B.A., Liberty University New York State Teaching Certification Joseph Ceccarelli* M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S., Houghton College Mark J. Ciccarella M.A. State University of New York College At Buffalo B.S., Northwood University New York State Teaching Certification William M. Cleary M.S. Roosevelt University B.S., State University of New York College At Buffalo A.A.A., Hilbert College Daniel F. Culver M.S., University of Cincinnati B.S., Empire State College A.A.S., Genesee Community College William C. Curtain J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Law B.S., Canisius College Maria I. Defeo M.S.Ed., Niagara University B.S., Canisius College New York State Teaching Certification Tina L. Dell M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Syracuse University Myles Englund M.B.A., Westminister College B.S., Brigham Young University Cathy V. Fabiatos M.S.Ed., M.S., Canisius College B.S., Houghton College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Nancy Fortunato* M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Fredonia A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Deborah A. Franklin* M.S.Ed., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Robin Gollwitzer B.S., Houghton College Vincent R. Gugliuzza M.S.L., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Margaret Hillery B.S., State University of New York at Fredonia A.A.S., Trocaire College Susan Holler* M.S., State University of New York at Albany B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo A.A.S., Niagara County Community College Kristen Hortman M.S.Ed., B.S.Ed.,, State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A.S., Erie Community College Sharon L. Kiley, CCRP B.S., Houghton College A.A.S., Trocaire College A.A.S., Erie Community College Michael Kozak* M.A., St. Bonaventure University B.A., Gannon University Amy L. Lupiani* L.L.M., State University of New York at Buffalo J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A. , University at Albany A.S. , Monroe Community College Virginia Majewski M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., State University at New York College at Buffalo AAS, Erie Community College Carla Marrazzo M.S.Ed., D'Youville College B.S., Houghton College Melissa Martin Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo Tina Michalowski M.S.Ed., St. Bonaventure University B.A., Hilbert College New York State Counseling Certification David R. Paluch M.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., State University of New York College At Buffalo Jonas Patricko M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Empire State College AAS, Niagara County Community College Richard Pawarski J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo M.S., DeVry University B.S., Empire State College Thomas Redmond M.B.A., University Of Phoenix B.S., Hilbert College A.A.S., Erie Community College Colleen Reedy M.S.Ed., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Houghton College Kevin M. Rice M.A., B.A., State University of New York at Fredonia New York State Teaching Certification Doris Richardson M.S., St. Bonaventure University B.A., Empire State College A.A.S., Trocaire College A.A., Erie Community College Kristen S. Ryan* M.B.A., State University of New York At Buffalo B.S., Cornell University Paul A. Savasta M.A., B.S., State University of New York At Buffalo A.S., Niagara County Community College Danielle M. Schwanekamp M.B.A., B.S., Canisius College New York State Teaching Certification Patricia A. Sedor* M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Elena L. Sireci * Ed.M., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo AAS, Niagara County Community College Susan Smith* M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Julie Spruce B.S., Daemen Collgeg A.S., Erie Community College Donna M. Tarasek M.S.Ed., D'Youville College B.A., Canisius College New York State Teaching Certification Bruce V. Urban A.B.D., State University of New York College at Buffalo M.S., Long Island University B.A., Fairleigh Dickinson University Deidra Whiteside M.B.A., Medaille College B.A., Empire State College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Brian J. Zelli Ed.M., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Canisius College AAS, Erie Community College NEW YORK Syracuse Downtown ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Michael Sattler Campus Director M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Mary Clifton Market Area Business Office Director M.B.A., B.S., LeMoyne College William Rauscher Dean of Administration/Registrar M.Div., B.A., St. Bernard's College Susan Schilling Dean of Instruction M.A., University of Phoenix B.S., State University of New York Empire State College Kim Holava- Fudge Dean of Student Services M.S.W., B.S., Syracuse University Andrew Cunningham Director of Admissions M.B.A., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Dawn Rajkowski Associate Director of Admissions B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Amy Pushlar Market Director of Professional Skills Center Kristen Aust Career Services Director, Market Area B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Shelley L. Schmidt Career Services Representative B.A., Columbia College Kristen Semrau Career Services Representative M.S., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Sara Jane Schumacher Career Services Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kathleen Cole Assistant to the Campus Director A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Lynn Milewski Master Admissions Representative B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Cheryl Galarneau Senior Admissions Representative B.A., State University of New York at Oswego 98 JANUARY 2010 * Denotes Full-Time Chris Payrot Senior Admissions Representative B.A., Columbia College Katie Stepanian Admissions Representative B.S., LeMoyne College Megan Zion Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Emily Martin High School Coordinator B.A. State University of New York at New Paltz Emilia Santoro High School Coordinator B.S. Cazenovia College Elena Tjaden Admissions Office Coordinator B.S., University of Connecticut Melanie Ramsey Admissions Administrative Assistant Myrtle Antone Receptionist Donna Masullo Evening Receptionist Nick Dimitrievski Athletic Director B.A., University of San Francisco Richard Cleary Cross Country Coach B.S. State University of New York at Cortland Matt Denkenberger Residence Hall Director/Campus Life Coordinator B.A., State University of New York at Oneonta Brenda Lee Jones Assistant Residence Hall Director M.S.Ed., B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Bea Owens Academic Advisor M.S., Syracuse University B.S., State University of New York at Empire State College Arne Komar Academic Advisor M.S.W., B.S., Syracuse University Lisa Rider Academic Advisor M.S., Syracuse University B.S., State University of New York at Brockport Lisa Schwartz Academic Advisor M.S. Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Craig Green Academic Advisor B.A. State University of New York at Oswego Lesley Ann Belge Librarian M.S.L.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Wendy Boldt Student Support Coordinator M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Melissa S. Moore Testing Center Coordinator B.A., LeMoyne College Susan M. Kelleher Academic Office Coordinator B.F.A., State University of New York at Oswego Keyona Kelly Academic Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Cortney Belge Financial Aid Business Office Coordinator B.A. State University of New York at Oswego Tami Eiklor Financial Services Manager A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Judy Phoenix Financial Services Advisor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Nicholas Kordek Financial Services Advisor B.S. State University of New York Institute of Technology Stacey McConnell Business Office Administrator M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., State University of New York at Potsdam Andy Chertow Technology Coordinator B.S., State University of New York at Binghamton Jamal Verity Assistant Technology Coordinator B.S., State University of New York at Cortland James Evans Market Facilities Manager B.A., State University of New York at Oswego David Owens Building Custodian Waldemar Santos Building Custodian FACULTY Janice Anderson M.S., New School University for Social Research B.S., State University of New York Institute of Technology Heather Andrews M.S., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Shaunna Arnold-Plank* M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Oswego B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Donna Ascenzi* M.S., State University of New York Institute of Technology M.S., State University of New York at Oswego B.S., Nazareth College Richard Basile* M.S., Sage College B.A., College of St. Rose Mary Brown* M.B.A., Marist College B.S., University of Nevada at Las Vegas Sara Cavallaro M.S.Ed., LeMoyne College B.S., State University of New York at Oneonta Frances Conley* M.S., New School University N.P., State University of New York at Upstate JoAnn Cortez* M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Central Michigan University Stephanie Denney* M.S. State University of New York at Oswego B.A. State University of New York at Albany Joseph DiPalma J.D., Syracuse University B.A., Boston College Robert Doolittle C.A.S., M.S., State University of New York at Oswego B.A., Hiram College Charles Durante M.B.A., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Christie Folsom* M.S. Ed, B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Brian Fortuna M.S., State University of New York at Cortland B.S., Western Connecticut State University Rita Gram M.S.Ed., Elmira College B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Joseph Kinn M.B.A., LeMoyne College B.S., Ohio State University Mary Susan Laughlin* M.S., B.S., State University of New York at Potsdam Deborah Less* M.S.Ed., State University of New York at Oswego B.S., State University of New York at Empire State College James Mahan M.B.A., Chapman University B.S., State University of New York at Empire State College Melody Mariani C.A.S., M.S., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo Frank McCarthy M.B.A., Syracuse University B.S., LeMoyne College Patricia McColm* D.C., Cleveland Chiropractic College M.A., University of Northern Colorado B.A., Colorado State University Joseph Musolino M.S., LeMoyne College B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Kimberly Myka M.S., State University of New York at Cortland B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Kirsten Nielsen PhD. ,Boston University B.S., Daemen College Robert Orcutt* M.S., Syracuse University M.A., University of Central Florida B.S., Syracuse University Jordan Pavlus J.D., Widener University B.A ,State University New York at Albany Cheryl Pearsall* M.S.N., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York Institute of Technology Paul Perrone* M.S.Ed., LeMoyne College BBA, Eastern Kentucky University Elizabeth Poda M.S., Syracuse University B.A., Nazareth College Shirley Rowser-Robinson M.S.Ed., Elmira College B.P.S., Cazenovia College Enid Reiley M.A., Chapman University B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook Holly Sammons M.S.L.S., Syracuse University B.S., University of the State of New York Joseph Scalisi M.A., B.A., State University of New York at Cortland Ann Evans-Scheibel M.S., B.S. State University of New York at Oswego 99 JANUARY 2010 Carol Schwartz* M.S.L.S., Syracuse University M.S. , Syracuse University James Shattell* M.B.A., B.S., State University of New York at Binghamton Daniel Sheehan* M.S., B.S., Syracuse University David Silbermann M.S., California University of Pennsylvania M.S.Ed., Slippery Rock University B.S. Ed., Kutztown University Kirsten Stanton M.S.Ed., B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Christina Sudol M.S., Elmira College B.A., Columbia College Laura Thomson* M.S., Sarah Lawrence College B.A., Albion College Freddy Triana M.A.T., B.S.E.E., Fairleigh Dickinson University Nancy Tucker MPA, Syracuse University B.A., Houghton College Harry Tuttle Ed.D., State University of New York at Buffalo M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Oswego Paschal Ugoji M.S.L.S., Syracuse University M.S.L.S., B.S., University of Ibadan Jamal Verity B.S., State University of New York at Cortland Michael Walsh M.S. Keuka College B.A. State University of New York at Oswego Alicin Welsh* M.S.Ed., B.S., State University of New York at Oswego Michaline Younis M.S., University of Cincinnati B.S., LeMoyne College Edward Zacholl* M.H.R., Keller Graduate School of Management B.A., LeMoyne College NEW YORK Syracuse North ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Susan Cumoletti Campus Director M.B.A., Capella University B.P.S., State University of New York Empire State College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Mary Clifton Market Business Office Director M.B.A., B.S., Le Moyne College Heather M. Macknik Director of Admissions B.S., State University of New York College at Cortland Kathleen M. Zakri Dean of Instruction M.S. Ed., Elmira College B.A., State University of New York College at Geneseo A.A., Broome Community College Terry Pudney, Jr. Dean of Student Services M.S.Ed., Elmira College B.A., Le Moyne College * Denotes Full-Time Andrea Pallone Associate Dean of Student Services M.S., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York College at Cortland A.A., Onondaga Community College Kristen Aust Career Services Market Area Director B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego Chris Godleski Associate Director of Career Services M.B.A., B.S., Le Moyne College Amy Pushlar Director Professional Skills Center Kristine Perkins Career Services Representative B.A., State University of New York College at Oswego Christine Rabice PSC Healthcare Account Executive B.S., Utica College Michelle L. Pickard PSC Coordinator Candie Sullivan PSC Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Central City Business Institute Brian Curtis PSC Financial Services Account Executive B.S., Le Moyne College Melissa McCloskey Academic Advisor B.A., Dennison University Erin Valovage Academic Advisor B.A., LeMoyne College Tricia Abbott Learning Center Coordinator C.A.S., State University of New York College at Oswego M.S. Ed., Elmira College B.A., Mount Saint Mary College Li (Julie) Zhu Head Librarian M.L.S., Syracuse University M.S.Ed., Nanjung Normal University B.S., Jiangxing Normal University Alissa DiRubbo Librarian M.S., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York College at Cortland Leslie Orman Academic Office Manager A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Lynn Ann Fields Student Services Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Amy Barrows Assistant to the Campus Director A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Maryanne Haynes Master Greeter Karen Smith Evening Receptionist Barbara Schad Admissions Office Coordinator Paula Annesi Master High School Coordinator B.S., State University of New York College at Fredonia A.A.S., Onondaga Community College Jon Bristol Associate Director of Admissions B.S., Le Moyne College Kristopher Muth Admissions Representative B.S., University of Wisconsin Richard Goodell Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York at Oneonta Matthew Shay Master Admissions Representative B.A., Excelsior College Kylee J. McFadden Admissions Representative B.A., State University of New York College at Oswego Michelle Lee Financial Services Manager B.S., Le Moyne College A.A.S., Cayuga Community College Wanda Maxwell Senior Financial Services Advisor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Joanne Gill Business Office Advisor A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Dana Sheftic Financial Services Advisor B.A., Sacred Heart University Marie E. Radley Technology Coordinator B.S., Colorado Technical University A.S., Central City Business Institute Bryan Yerton Assistant Technology Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College James Evans Market Director of Facilities B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego A.S., Onondaga Community College John Marzullo Maintenance Supervisor Vince Iorio Facilities Custodian FACULTY Cynthia Adams, PHR* M.A., B.S., State University of New York Empire State College John S. Adams M.A., Syracuse University M.Div., Cornerstone University Th.B., Piedmont Bible College Leigh Bishop M.S., State University of New York at Potsdam B.A., University of Rochester Mark Boyce* M.A., State University of New York College at Oswego B.A., State University of New York College at Fredonia Marlene Bryant Ph. D., Boston College M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology B.A.., Harvard University A.A., Pine Manor College Patricia A. Cameron, CMRS* M.S., B.S., Syracuse University A.A.S., Cayuga Community College Susan Camille M.A., State University of New York College at Cortland B.S., B.A., Columbia College A.A., Onondaga County Community College Jesse Clayton M.A., (in progress) State University of New York College at Oswego B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology Jeannie Comins M.B.A., B.S., Columbia College J. Jos Cortez M.S., University of Dayton B.S., Loras College 100 JANUARY 2010 Michelle Logan M.L.S., B.A., Syracuse University Annette Lombard* M.B.A., Columbia College B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego A.A.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Canton 101 JANUARY 2010 Richard Cushman* M.B.A., B.A., Columbia College A.O.S., Central City Business Institute William R. DeForest, III* M.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology M.F.A., Ohio State University B.F.A., State University of New York College at Oswego K. Michael DeLorm M.S., Syracuse University B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego Kelly Delevan M.S., University of Texas at Austin B.A., University of New Hampshire Christopher DeProspero M.B.A., State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome B.A., State University of New York College at Albany Catherine Desimone M.S.N., B.S.N., State University of New York Upstate Medical University A.A.S., Crouse Hospital School of Nursing Sam Drori M.S., Syracuse University B.A., Concordia University Regina Drumm M.B.A., Le Moyne College B.A., St. Bonaventure University Deborah DuFour M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego Phil Dunham J.D., B.A., Syracuse University Brian Fortuna, CMRS M.S., State University of New York College at Cortland B.S., Western Connecticut State University Richard Fowler J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo Law School M.B.A., M.S., University of Rochester B.A., Hobart College Sara Fritz M.P.H. Columbia University B.S., University of Vermont School of Nursing Sam Giamas* M. S.., Ed., Elmira College B.A., A.A., Columbia College Jessica Galvin M.A., B.F.A., State University of New York College at Oswego Rosemary Hage M.S., Capella University B.A., State University of New York College at Geneseo A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Dorothy Harshberger M.S., State University of New York at Oswego B.B.A., Business Education, Evangel College Nicole Heath M.S., State University of New York College at Oswego B.S., Le Moyne College Robert Jaworski D.C., B.S., Texas College of Chiropractic Charles H. Jerred, III* M.A., B.A., State University of New York College at Oswego Steven C. Kempisty* J.D., Massachusetts School of Law at Andover B.A., State University of New York College at Fredonia Jason Larson Ph.D. Candidate Syracuse University M.L.S., University of Kentucky M.A., Miami University B.A., Gordon College Kim Loura M.S., State University of New York College at Oswego B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo Phil Mazza M.B.A., Kaplan University B.S., LeMoyne College Harold Milligan M.B.A., State University of New York College at Oswego B.S., John Fisher College Mary Jo Miuccio M.A., California State University at Dominguez Hills B.A., City College of New York A.A.S., Onondaga Community College Christopher Nelson C.A.S., State University of New York College at Cortland M.B.A., Le Moyne College B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego Virginia Niccoli* M.S., State University of New York at Oswego B.S., State University of New York at Oswego John Nord* Ph.D., (in progress) Capella University M.S., Colorado Technical University B.S., Strayer University Trista O'Hara J.D., Syracuse University College of Law B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A., Onondaga Community College Jared Paventi M.A., Syracuse University B.A., Saint Bonaventure University Cheryl Pearsall, RN* M.S.N., Syracuse University B.A., State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome Gerri Petragnani, RN* M.S., (in progress) Walden University B.S.N., Keuka College A.A.S., Crouse Hospital School of Nursing Andrea Pratt J.D., State University of New York, at Buffalo, University at Buffalo Law School M.P.H., University at Buffalo the State University of New York; B.A., University at Buffalo the State University of New York Nathan Pritts Ph. D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette M.F.A., Warren Wilson College M.A., Northwestern State University of Louisiana B.S., State University of New York college at Brockport William N. Rava* M.S., State University of New York College of Technology at Utica B.S., Utica College of Syracuse University A.A.S., Herkimer County Community College Gerald Raymond J.D., M.S., Syracuse University B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport A.A., Onondaga Community College Kimberly Reed M.S., Syracuse University B.A., Le Moyne College Laurel Reid M.S., State University of New York College of Science and Forestry M.S., Northwestern University B.A., Columbia University Carla Senecal M.A., (in progress) State University of New York College at Oswego B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego A.A.S., Onondaga County Community College Lelia Shelton* M.S., B.F.A., Syracuse University Mary Simone M.S., Syracuse University B.A., Hobart & William Smith College Susan Smillie M.B.A., Syracuse University B.S., Nazareth College Fredrick Smith, Jr. M.A., Webster College B.A., Columbia College A.A., Cochise College Patrick Snow M.A., B.A., Syracuse University Maria Sofia* M.B.A., B.S., Columbia College Lynette Sorbello M.A., B.F.A., Syracuse University A.A.S., Mohawk Valley Community College Kirstin Stanton M.S., State University of New York at Oswego B.S., State University of New York at Oswego A.A., Onondaga County Community College Kathleen Stevenson J.D., Hofstra University of Law M. Mus., University of Michigan B.M.E., Baldwin-Wallace College Barbara Tatko-Brescia M.A., B.S., Castleton State College A.A., Green Mountain College Michelle Tracy, PHR M.B.A., B.S., Le Moyne College Joseph Torok* M.S., B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Sarah Tucci J.D., Syracuse University B.S., State University of New York at Albany Margaret Wickman M.S.Ed., State University of New York College at Oswego M.A., Syracuse University B.A., Bucknell University Charles S. Wilson* M.B.A., Columbia College B.A., Waynesburg College Kristy Lee Witt M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., Wells College Todd Wolfe M.B.A., B.S., State University of New York College at Albany A.S., Columbia Greene Community College Yuxin Yang C.A.S., M.L.S., M.A., Syracuse University B.E., People's University of China Christina Zagyva M.S., Maine College of Art B.F.A., State University of New York at Oswego OHIO Cleveland Downtown ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF James Ploskonka Director of Ohio Colleges Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.M., Boston Conservatory B.S., University of Pennsylvania at Mansfield John Girard Cleveland Downtown Campus Director M.A., B.A., State University of New York at Albany Samantha Jura Admissions Coordinator A.A.B., Remington College Bernetta Lee Receptionist Julie Wittenauer Receptionist 102 JANUARY 2010 Jamie A. Didion Admissions Representative B.A., Oberlin College Karen Hale High School Admissions Representative Regina Heredos Admissions Representative Mike Swanson Admissions Representative B.S., Bowling Green University Kelly Yurick Admissions Representative AAS, Cuyahoga Cummunity College Sarah Walsh Admissions Representative B.S. Education, Kent State University Brian Wilson Director of Admissions B.S., Bowling Green University Clifford Wallace Dean of Instruction Ph.D., Cleveland State University ED.S., School Superintendency, Cleveland State University M.ED., Administration, Cleveland State University B.S., Hampton University W. Jan Gholson Dean of Student Services M.S., University of Phoenix B.A., Notre Dame College Audra T. Jones Associate Dean of Instruction M.B.A, Baldwin Wallace College B.A., English Arts Deborah Sample Registrar M.E. Adult Learning and Development B.A. Business Management AAS, Arts Cuyahoga Community College Leiza Spencer Academic Coordinator A.D., Business Info Systems A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Steve Richardson Evening Academic Coordinator B.A., Business, Org. Management A.S.S., Liberal Arts Don Vicarel Learning Center Coordinator M.M., Cleveland State University B.A., Youngstown University Ardelia Higgins Senior Academic Advisor M.Ed., Cleveland State University B.S., Cleveland State University Joseph Dudley Librarian M.A., M.L.I.S., Kent State University B.A., Wittenberg University Donna McCullough Market Financial Services Manager Diploma, Bryant & Stratton College DeAuntha Logan Financial Services Advisor M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S., Myers University Brian Springer Accounting Manager A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Jill Nelly Career Services Director of Ohio Colleges B.S. Management A.A.B. Computer Applications Traci Mallery Career Services Representative B.S.A.S., Youngstown State University Jessica Kobasic Career Services Assistant A.A.B., Ohio Business College B.B.A., Bryant & Stratton College Bryant Scott Technology Coordinator A.A., Computer Science/Business Penn State University Shannon White Admissions Representative B.A., Business Management Ohio University Heather O'Keefe Admissions Representative B.A., University of Toledo A.A., Communications/A.A., Paralegal Lauren Riddle Admissions Representative B.A., Education Green State University Latosha Tate High School Coordinator B.S., Business Finance, Central State University M.B.A., Management & Labor Relations Cleveland State University FACULTY Frank Aveni J.D., Cleveland State University B.S., Bowling Green State University Thomas Baltakis* M.B.A., University of Phoenix BBA, Cleveland State University Nick Bellas B.S., Kent State University M.P.A., University of Akron Alita Cauley M.S., Tiffin University B.A., Myers University Victoria Cross-Cireddu M.B.A., Finance Accounting, Cleveland State University B.A., Mathematics, Psychology, Cleveland State University Sharyna Cloud B.A., Cleveland State University M.P.A., Cleveland State University Keith Conn M.S., California National University M.S., Lake Erie College B.S., Cook's Institute of Electronic Engineering AAS, University of Akron Bruce Coscia* M.B.A./T.M., University of Phoenix B.E.E.T., ETI Technical College A.E.E.T., Electronic Technology Institute Victoria Dorsey M.A., American Inter-Continental University M.N.E., Kaplan College B.A., The Ohio State University Vicki Evans M.L.R.H.R., Cleveland State B.S.B.A., Youngstown State University John Gidley* M.A., B.A., Case Western Reserve University Zola Hardy* M.Ed., B.A., Cleveland State University A.A., Bryant & Stratton College Miekel Hollowell M.S., University of Phoenix B.S., Baldwin Wallace College A.S., University of Toledo * Denotes Full-Time Rena Hunter M.A., University of Denver M.A., Georgia State University B.A., Dickinson College Dwayne Hurt M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S.B.A, David N. Myers University Elvira Kitsis M.C.I.S., Cleveland State University B.S.M.E., Polytechnical Institute Bryan Loretz M.S., Tiffin University B.S., Meyers University Michael Mackerty M.B.A., Business, Myers College B.S., Accounting Dyke College William Markus M.S.W., University of Michigan B.A., Hebrew University of Jerusalem Judith Matlin* J.D., Cleveland State University B.A., Ursuline D. Marcy McIntyre* M.Ed., University of Phoenix B.A., Notre Dame College Amanda Nicol M.B.A., Case Western Reserve University B.A., Case Western Reserve University Jude Odu B.A., Ursuline College M.S.H.S., George Washington University Fred Owens* D.B.A., California Coast University M.B.A., Baldwin Wallace College B.S.E.E., Cleveland State University Aaron Plasco J.D., Law, Cleveland State University BBA, Organizational Managment, Tiffin University Nancy Rahn M.S., Westchester University B.S., East Stroudsburg College Rich Rawlinson M.B.A., Baldwin Wallace College B.A., Baldwin Wallace College Robert Rosenfeld LL.M Law, University of Manitoba M.B. Canada J.D., Cleveland Marsahll College of law B.S., Kent State University Michael Salois M.Ed., Azusa Pacific University M.P.A., Cleveland State University B.A., University of LaVerne Robert Schordock M.B.A., Baldwin Wallace College BBA, Cleveland State University B.S.,B.A., Ohio State Kathryn Steinfurth* M.B.A., Lake Erie College B.S., BBA, Myers University Cheryl Sullivan* M.Ed., Baldwin Wallace College B.C.B.A., Dyke College Nancy Sullivan* M.A., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo State University of New York at Buffalo Vinita Tiralapuram M.B.A., Acme College B.C.S., St. Pious College Dennis Trnavsky* M.B.A., T.M., University of Phoenix B.E.E.T., Bryant & Stratton College A.E.E.T., ETI Technical College Daniel C. Tuma* Ph.D., M.S.E.E., M.S.I.E., Cleveland State University M.S.E.C.T., Indiana State University B.S.E.T., Eastern Kentucky University Donald Vicarel* M.M., Cleveland State University B.A., Youngstown University Joseph Vrooman* M.S., Cleveland State University B.A., Cleveland State University Bill White J.D., Cleveland State University B.S.B.A., University of Dayton OHIO Eastlake ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF James Ploskonka Director of Cleveland Colleges Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.M., Boston Conservatory B.S., University of Pennsylvania at Mansfield Ted Hansen Campus Director Ph.D., M.Ed., B.S., Bowling Green State University Kristine Benard Dean of Student Services M.A., B.A., University of Toledo Rhonda Butler Career Services Director M.A., B.S., Eastern Michigan University Donna Goldstein Market Business Office Director B.S., Myers University Florentine Hoelker Dean of Instruction Ph.D., M.A., Loyola University Chicago B.A., University of Notre Dame Melanie Johnson Director of Admissions B.A., John Carroll University Lisa Patterson Financial Aid Director B.A., Muskingum College Jodi Allen Senior Academic Advisor B.A., Kent State University Mary Bitler Business Office Assistant Rachel Blankfeld Admissions Representative B.A., University of Toledo Shannon Boyd Financial Services Advisor B.S., Bowling Green State University Lauren Castagnero Career Services Representative B.A., John Carroll University Robyn Cecil Nursing Dept. Administrative Assistant Melanie Coleman Admissions Representative B.A., Ashland University Alisha Cray Receptionist A.A., Medical Administrative Assisting Bryant & Stratton College Aniya Frazier Administrative Assistant A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Nancy Geiger Librarian M.L.S., Case Western Reserve University B.S.Ed., Ohio University Edward Hume Academic Advisor B.S. Ed., Kent State University Justin Hood Admissions Representative B.S., Ashland University Angel Jackson-Berry Academic Advisor M.A., New York University Dave Kelly Admissions Representative B.A., Kent State University Matthew McPeek Admissions Representative Lynda Lofquist Admissions Representative Roxann Moten Senior Financial Services Representative Suzanne Nash Associate Director of High School Admissions B.A., Psychology, Cleveland State University Robert Petroff Technology Coordinator A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College A.E.E.T., Electronic Technology Institute Tracy Piechowiak Academic Coordinator A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Jennifer Rice Senior Admissions Representative B.S.M., Indiana-Wesleyan University Megan Soeder Senior Admissions Representative B.A., Miami University Marcia Teifer Business Office Assistant Melody Wainio Registrar M.S., Capella University B.S.T.E., University of Akron Yolanda White Career Services Assistant Jackie Williams Admissions Coordinator A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Sara Zeman Senior High School Admissions Representative B.A., University of Akron FACULTY Ed Anderson* M.B.A., University of Phoenix M.P.A., B.A., Cleveland State University Marcia Backos* M.A., Case Western Reserve University B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University Victoria Bowden* M.S.N., B.S.N., Ursuline College Herman Lipford* M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh B.S., Princeton University James Scherbak* M.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Kent State University Joseph Stankus* D.C., Life University B.S.B.A., John Carroll University Shirley Asale J.D., Cleveland Marshall School of Law, Cleveland State University Elizabeth Baca M.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Cleveland State University Rosemary Bakasa* Ph.D., M.S.N., Case Western Reserve University B.Ed., University of Zimbabwe Kimberly Barnett-Mills J.D., Cleveland-Marshall College of Law B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College Gary Bennett M.B.A., B.S., Case Western Reserve University Danelle Burrows* M.S.N., B.S.N., B.A., Ursuline College Sheila Butler* M.S.N., University of Phoenix B.S.N., Case Western Reserve University Carmela Carter M.B.A., Myers University B.S., Myers University Mary Courtwright* M.S, Walden University B.S., Indiana State University Helen Cusick Ph.D., Kent State University M.A., Ashland Theological Seminary Utpal Datta* Ph.D., University of Calcutta Timothy Farrell* M.A.Ed., B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College B.A., Cleveland State University J. William Finkler* M.S.Ed., Kent State University B.A., John Carroll University Lee Frankinburger M.S., Walden University B.S., Indiana University Jerome Fudurich* B.B.A., Cleveland State University Nancy Geiger* M.L.S., Case Western Reserve University B.S.Ed., Ohio University Joseph Gerger* M.S., University of Akron B.A., Kent State University Arthur Grady M.L.S., Kent State University B.A., Cleveland State University Patricia Grady M.A., John Carroll University B.A., Bowling Green State University Daniel Holderbaum* Ph.D., B.S., Cleveland State University Annette Jackson* M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., Ursuline College Joseph Jerdonek M.B.A., Case Western Reserve University B.E.S., Fenn College Byron Kanoti* M.F.A., Bowling Green State University B.A., Beloit College Cawas Kapadia Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.S., Carnegie-Mellon University B.S., University of Bombay Ellen Klein M.S.Ed., John Carroll University B.S., Ohio State University Nadia Kolta M.L.S., Kent State University Barbara Konestabo* M.S.N., Loyola University Chicago B.S.N., Case Western Reserve University Pamela Kurt J.D., Cleveland-Marshall College of Law M.P.A., B.A., Cleveland State University Ed Leoson* M.S., Tiffin University B.S., Tiffin University 103 JANUARY 2010 Robert Morgan M.Ed., Kent State University B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College Donna Morlani M.Ed., Cleveland State University B.S., Kent State University Eric Myles M.L.R., Cleveland State University B.A., Mercyhurst College Barbara Palmer-Settle M.B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College B.S., Myers University Mark Parks, Jr. M.B.A., University of Phoenix Gwendolyn Penn M.M.G., Myers University B.S.B.A, Myers University Raquel Rodriguez* M.S.N., B.S.N., Cleveland State University Latease Robinson M.P.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Kent State University Nancy Rowell Ph.D., M.A., St. Mary's Seminary Deborah Ruffin M.M., B.S., Myers University Michael Rusek M.B.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Edinboro University Davida Smith* M.S.N., University of Phoenix B.S.N., University of Akron Melissa Stallings* M.S.N., Kent State University B.S.N., University of Akron Joel Tscherne M.L.S., Kent State University B.A., Cleveland State University Robert Weimer M.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Cleveland State University Kristine Weinrauch* A.D.N., Cuyahoga Community College M.S.N., Walden University OHIO Parma ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF James Ploskonka Director of Ohio Colleges Ph.D., University of Kentucky M.M., Boston Conservatory B.S., University of Pennsylvania at Mansfield Lisa Mason Campus Director M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Bowling Green State University Susan Jelenic Dean of Instruction M.A., Ursuline College B.S., Cleveland State University Frank Torigoe Dean of Student Services M.A., Western Reserve University B.A., University of Hawaii Linda Jackson Associate Dean of Instruction M.P.A., B.A., Cleveland State University 104 * Denotes Full-Time Marilyn Huber Registrar M.Ed., B.S., Cleveland State University Elizabeth E. Eureka Student Advisor M.Ed., University of Akron B.S., Kent State University Katie M. Russo Student Advisor M.Ed., Youngstown State University B.A., Ohio State University Kevin Breen Librarian M.L.S., Queens College, City University of New York B.A., Old Dominion University A.S., Community College of the Air Force Danylo Dmytrykiw Library Assistant M.L.I.S., Kent State University M.A., Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland M.A., University of Michigan Irene Demchuk Academic Administrative Assistant A.A.B., University of Akron Traci SuSong, CMA Medical Assisting Market Program Director MBA/HCM, University of Findlay B.A., Ursuline College AAS, Cuyahoga Community College Kathleen E. Burke Market Practicum Coordinator B.S., Ohio University Theresa Jozwiak, CMA Medical Assisting Administrative Assistant A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Mary Ellen Campobasso Nursing Program Coordinator M.S.N., R.N., University of Akron Kelly Mudra Nursing Dept. Administrative Assistant A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Judith Matlin Criminal Justice/Admin Program Director J.D., Cleveland Marshall College of Law B.A., Ursuline College R.N., St. Alexis School of Nursing Jason Mullin General Education/Career Core/Library Program Director M.A., B.A., Cleveland State University Rich Rawlinson Accounting/Business /Info Tech/BBA/HR Specialist Program Director M.B.A., B.A., Baldwin Wallace College Deborah Ginter Director of Career Services B.A., University of Pittsburgh Ian Marks Career Services Representative B.A., Ohio State University Jennifer Rivera Career Services Administrative Assistant A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Jeff Perry Business Manager A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Maggie Mickunas Business Office Assistant B.A., John Carroll University Donna McCullough Market Financial Services Manager Diploma, Bryant & Stratton College Robert Eden Financial Services Manager M.B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College B.A., Franciscan University of Steubenville JANUARY 2010 Colleen Garibotti Senior Financial Services Advisor A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Brandy McConnell Financial Services Advisor Judy Hull Financial Services Advisor A.A.B., Kaplan University Michael Nakonachny Market Technology Manager A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Edward Roche Building Maintenance Charles Jackson Military Program Director Ohio Colleges A.A.B., Hocking College Diploma, US Army Sergeants Major Academy William Cassidy Market Director of Admissions M.Ed., Cleveland State University B.A., Ohio State University Sarah Jutte Master Admissions Representative B.S., Kent State University Rebecca Pelc Master Admissions Representative B.G.S., Kent State University Bonnie Domanich Admissions Representative Matt Collier Admissions Representative A.A.B., Trumbull Business College Erika Lane Admissions Representative M.M., University of Phoenix B.A., Kent State University Adriane Hicks High School Coordinator B.A., Adrian College Brian D. Klima Admissions Representative A.A., in Business Administration Ohio Business College Sarah R. Gary Admissions Representative M.A., Instructional Leadership Robert Morris University Joseph R. Bican Admissions Representative A.A., Business Management College of Mt. St. Joseph Andrea Inman Associate Director of Admissions B.S., B.A., Management & Marketing Robert Morris University Tristan Callans High School Admissions Representative B.B.A., Northwood University Beverly Martin Admissions Coordinator Diploma, Bryant & Stratton College Nicole Miller Day Receptionist/Administrative Assistant Nicole Fumich Evening Receptionist FACULTY John Barber, III* D.C., Cleveland Chiropractic College Spencer Bellamy M.A., B.A., Kent State University Laura Billetz M.A., Cleveland State University B.S., St. Joseph's College Barbara Biltz* M.S., University of Phoenix B.A., Kent State University Kevin Breen* M.L.S., Queens College, City University of New York B.A., Old Dominion University A.S., Community College of the Air Force Edward Buchanan M.A., B.A., University of Akron Monica Butko M.L.R.H.R., M.Ed., B.B.A., Cleveland State University Michael Collier M.B.A., Weatherhead School of Management B.A., Washington & Lee University Donald Deemer M.B.A., Baldwin Wallace College B.S., B.A., Kent State University Richard Deger* M.B.A., B.S., Pennsylvania State University Kathy Foley* M.Ed., Cleveland State University B.A., University of Toledo Linda Garrity M.S.N., B.S.N., University of Pittsburgh John Gidley* M.A., B.A., Case Western Reserve University A.A., Lakeland Community College Kathy Halligan* M.S., University of Texas B.S.N., Marquette University Frank Heinrich M.A., University of West Georgia B.A., Cleveland State University Stephen Hess* M.S., B.S., Cleveland State University Dean Jenkins M.A., Kent State University B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College Daniel Kaminsky* M.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Kent State University Daniel Kortyka M.Ed., Boston University B.A., Borromeo College A.A.B., Cuyahoga Community College Michael Mascella M.S., University of Oklahoma B.A., University of Maryland Michelle Maus M.B.A., Cleveland State University B.S., Ohio University Athena Mericsko M.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Mount Union College David Mitchell M.B.A., M.I.S., University of Phoenix B.A., Siena Heights University Paul Mitchell M.S., Drexel University B.A., Mount Union College Brigid Novak M.L.I.S., Drexel University B.A., John Carroll University Edwina O'Rourke* M.Ed., Cleveland State University B.S.N., Kent State University Mary Palmieri M.Ed., B.A., Cleveland State University Brian Pell M.B.A., B.S., University of Phoenix Maria Pelleschi* M.S., Walden University B.S., Bowling Green University Edward Progar M.Ed., Cleveland State University B.S., Clarion Univerity Edmund Rossman M.L.I.S., Kent State University M.A., Ohio University B.A., Cleveland State University Kathleen Saxton* M.B.A., B.S., David N. Myers College A.A.B., Bryant & Stratton College Sandi Senn B.S., University of Cincinnati Gloria Solarz M.B.A., Cleveland State University B.S., Bowling Green University Joyce Tubbs B.A., Baker College Cathleen Varholick M.L.R.H.R., Cleveland State University B.S., University of Akron Karen Wajda* M.S.N., Walden University Joseph Wellington* M.D., Case Western Reserve University B.A., Ohio State University William White J.D., Cleveland State University B.S.B.A., University of Dayton William Zarefoss* M.B.A., B.A., Baldwin Wallace College A.A.B., Cuyahoga Community College VIRGINIA Richmond ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Tracy B. Nannery Director of Virginia Colleges/Vice President of Admissions M.B.A., Capella University B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Beth Murphy Campus Director M.B.A., American Intercontinental University B.S., Mary Washington College B.A., Mary Washington College Yulonda Grant Director of Career Services M.A., Central Michigan University B.S., Norfolk State University Brenda Sands Hines Director of Career and Community Services M.S., Troy State University B.S., Holy Names College Counseling Endorsement, Virginia State University Darlene Lachut Dean of Instruction M.B.A., Strayer University B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A.S., Erie Community College David Mayle Director of Admissions B.A., Shepherd College Deborah Merritt Dean of Student Services B.S., St. Paul's College Ditamichelle Terry Business Office Director M.B.A., Averett University M.A., Tabernacle Bible College B.S., St. Paul's College Jackie Brown Associate Dean of Instruction M.A., Central Michigan University B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Brianne Meagher Associate Dean of Student Services M.Ed., University of Florida B.A., Coastal Carolina University Yuri Providence Associate Director of Admissions M.S., University of Phoenix B.S., Virginia State University Eddie Webster Financial Aid Manager B.S., Longwood University Terry Boots Network Administrator B.S., Strayer University Montique Bowser High School Admissions Representative A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College James Claiborne Technical Coordinator A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Ahmedta Dixon Senior Admissions Representative B.S., Longwood University John Donelson Financial Aid Advisor A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Mary Evans Academic Advisor M.Ed., Virginia State University B.S., Sacramento State University Jon Flemming Admissions Representative B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Yolanda Gomez Gray Academic Advisor M.A., Liberty University B.S., Hope International University Michele Harris Children's College Director B.B.A., A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Debbie Holmes New Student Advisor M.S., Central Michigan University B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Katrina Hunt Financial Aid Coordinator/Advisor B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Breanoh Lafayette-Brooks Marketing and Communications Coordinator B.A., Longwood University Tammy Lambert Assistant to the Campus Director/Human Resource Coordinator Treva Latif Senior High School Admissions Representative B.S., Virginia Union University Portia Lawson Senior Admissions Representative A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kristen Matthews Career Services Coordinator B.S., Virginia State University Ryan Mckernan Technical Coordinator A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College 105 JANUARY 2010 Rosann Meagher Librarian M.S., University of Illinois B.A., Macmurray College Katie Nance Front Desk Receptionist Ronald Nix Maintenance Nishone Powell Business Office Coordinator B.A., A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Amy Ramkey Front Desk Receptionist A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Bernadette Randolph Career Services Coordinator Karen Randolph Administrative Assistant to Academics A.A.S., John Tyler Community College Ann Ritger Admissions Coordinator M.M., B.S., University of Phoenix Chavonn Scott Academic Advisor M.Ed., Averett University B.A., Virginia State University Susan Sheretz Administrative Assistant Melissa Thomas Senior Admissions Representative B.A., Knoxville College Teresa Turner Registrar M.Ed., B.S., Strayer University A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Lisa Walton Admissions Representative Kathleen Wiltsie Clinical Coordinator M.S., University of Virginia B.S., University of Texas David Worsham Financial Aid Advisor A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College FACULTY Donna Anderson M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University B.I.S., University of Virginia Lisa Baldwin M.A., George Washington University B.A., University of Richmond Barbara Basl B.S., M.B.A., Virginia Commonwealth University Mary Anina Beaman* Program Director of Nursing M.S., Cappella University B.A., Randolph Macon College A.A.S., John Tyler Community College Linda Bell-Sinclair M.I.S, University of Phoenix B.S., University of Maryland Donna Bennett M.F.A., University of Alabama B.F.A., Virginia Commonwealth University A.A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Rebekah Biercz* Subject Area Coordinator, English M.F.A., University of Wyoming B.A., Virginia Commonwealth University 106 JANUARY 2010 Paul Bland J.D., Duke University M.B.A., Harvard Graduate School of Business B.A., Howard University William Bray J.D., College of William and Mary B.A., University of Virginia Hugh Fisher J.D., University of Virginia M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University B.A., Randolph-Macon College Gloria Foote M.B.A., Averett University B.S., York College A.A.S., Pitt Technical College Judy Garner M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute Mark Gettle Ph.D., Capella University M.A., Strayer University B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Cheryl Gill M.Ed., Virginia State University B.A., Brooklyn College Russell Granderson M.S., University of Richmond B.B.A., Bryant & Stratton College Gladys Bonita Grant* Program Director, Allied Health B.S., University of North Carolina James Guffey* Program Director, Legal Studies M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University B.A., Saint Leo College A.A.S., Tidewater Community College Michael Hawkins* Subject Area Coordinator, Business Studies M.Ed., College of William and Mary B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University A.S., Richard Bland College Cheryl Hearn M.Ed., Wayne State University M.A., George Washington University B.A., Capital University Caroline Holtzman M.S., B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Winston James M.S., B.S., Brooklyn College Oben Johnson* Program Director, Information Studies M.A., Webster University B.S., State University of New York at Albany Laura Kerr Assistant Librarian M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., Canisius College Joette Lehberger* M.A., American Christian College B.A., M.A., Carolina University A.D.N., Butler County College Gil Logan* Program Director, Business Studies Ph.D., Capella University M.L.A., B.A., University of Richmond Tracy Logan* M.S., Capella University B.A.S., A.A.S., University of Richmond Mary Mescall B.B.A., Averett College T.Tony Pham J.D., University of Richmond B.A.,College of William and Mary Larry W. Ramsey Lead Faculty, Accounting/HRS Programs M.B.A., Averett University B.S., Auburn University Audrey R. Reed Lead Faculty, Administrative Assistance M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University B.A., College of William & Mary Allen Shore* Subject Area Coordinator, Math M.S., Murray State University B.S., Appalachian State University Donna Slaughter* Program Director, Liberal Arts M.S., Old Dominion University B.A., Longwood University Sandy Spencer* M.S., Old Dominion University B.S., Alverno College Carolyn Spinner* M.Ed., Boston University B.A., Wellesley College Andrea Stapleton* M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute B.A., Longwood College Allan Trosclair M.B.A., M.P.A., Golden Gate University B.S., University of Southern Mississippi Eric Upthegrove M.S., Central Michigan University B.S., Park University Elizabeth Waller M.A., University of Richmond B.A., Mary Washington College Michelle Wilson* Interim Program Director, Legal Studies J.D., Thomas Cooley Law School B.A., Virginia Commonwealth University Steve Wilson B.S., University of Vermont Michael Winborne M.A., Kaplan University B.A., Criminal Justice * Denotes Full-Time VIRGINIA Virginia Beach ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Tracy B. Nannery Director of Virginia Colleges/ Vice President of Admissions M.B.A., Capella University B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Lee Hicklin Campus Director M.A., B.S., Murray State University Aretha Press Assistant to the Campus Directors/HR Coordinator M.B.A., BBA, Strayer University Eric Blackwell Business Office Director B.S., Louisiana State University Machelle Elliott Director of Military Services/PSC Operations Manager Medical Assisting Diploma, Southern Career Institute Vivian Rogers Dean of Instruction M.A., Regent University B.S., Boston University Ronda Toll Director of Career Services/System Director of Career Services M.Ed., Regent University B.S., Old Dominion University Anita Wyche Dean of Student Services M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., St. Leo University Deana Southerland Director of Admissions BBA, Bryant & Stratton College AAS, University of Maryland Bethann Verbal Financial Aid Manager B.S., Niagara University Lisa Baker Financial Aid Officer A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Rosie Brown Career Services Coordinator AAS, Bryant & Stratton College Katherine Cartee Admissions Office Manager A.O.S., National Business College Tamika Chadwick Student Services Administrative Assistant AAS, Bryant & Stratton College Lori Curvan Admissions Representative Karen Dullaghan Senior Admissions Representative AAS, Iowa Central Community College Trishawn Gregg Financial Aid Officer B.S.B.A., Old Dominion University Eric Harrell Senior Admissions Representative M.S., Boston University B.S., Norfolk State University Debra Harvey Academic Assistant Angela E. Haywood Associate Director of Career Services AAS, Sandhills Community College Joseph Howe Student Services Advisor M.A., Binghamton University Sheila L. Koenig Registrar Masters of Management, Cambridge University BBA, Bryant & Stratton College AAS, Commonwealth College Natarsha Lee Academic Administrative Assistant AAS, BBA, Bryant & Stratton College Barbara Lewis Children's College Director AAS, Commonwealth College Roz Miltier Student Services Coordinator B.S., Hampton University Kathleen Monaco Librarian M.L.S., B.A., University of Pittsburgh Vivian Pena High School Coordinator B.A., Penn State University Scott Picott Admissions Representative April Sellars Admissions Representative Lisa Sellers Student Services Advisor M.B.A., Troy University B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University Mark Spivey Librarian Ph.D., M.A., University of North Carolina M.S., University of Tennessee Jerri Wells Administrative Receptionist AAS, Bryant & Stratton College Benee Williamson Business Office Assistant AAS, Commonwealth College Cas Garza Admissions Representative Tracie Bruce Senior High School Admissions Representative B.S., Old Dominion University Shannon Crayton Financial Aid Officer FACULTY Abram Abramov M.S., University of the Soviet Union Jane Barksdale B.S., Southern Illinois University Vivian Brown J.D., Regent University School of Law B.S., College of William and Mary Harvella Brownson Ph.D, M.B.A., Regent University Kelly Buffaloe M.A., Norfolk State University B.A., Virginia Wesleyan College Cheryl Burton M.A., North Carolina University B.S., Macalester College Jack Collins* M.A., Old Dominion University B.A., East Carolina University Amanda Conley M.A., Norfolk State University B.A., Youngstown State University Edwin F. Cummings, Jr.* M.A., University of Southern California B.A., Dartmouth College Holly Duckett M.A., Norfolk State University B.S., Old Dominion University Michelle Ellis Young* M.A., Hampton University B.A., University of Houston Donald Emmett* M.S., Old Dominion University B.Ed., Keene State University David Flannery* M.S., Troy State University B.S., Southern Illinois University Misti Goodson M.A., B.S., Old Dominion University Gardiner Haight J.D., B.S., University of Virginia Sharon Hayes M.S., Philadelphia Biblical University B.S., Delaware State University Krystal Hilton M.P.H., Eastern Virginia Medical School/ Old Dominion University B.S., Norfolk State Kimberly Hutson J.D., Washington University B.S., Indiana University Denise S. Jenkins M.H.A., Strayer University B.S., Norfolk State University Joanne Jennings B.S., Old Dominion University Morgan Joe* D.C., Cleveland Chiropractic College B.S.,Virginia Commonwealth University Todd Jones M.P.A., B.S., Old Dominion University Regina Lightfoot-Clark M.B.A., American Intercontinental University B.A., Howard University Michael P. Loizides* M.B.A., B.S., Old Dominion University Daniel Magee* M.S., B.S., Old Dominion University Robin Marable M.A.,B.S., Norfolk State University Carol Martin-Napier M.S., Troy University B.S., Park College 107 JANUARY 2010 Cornelia Mutts* Ph.D., Regent University M.B.A., Regent University Fred Neely M.S., University of Arkansas B.S., University of New Mexico Elizabeth Nelson M.Ed., M.A., Regent University B.S., State University of New York at Albany E. Kathleen Newton M.A., Regent University Nancy Speisser M.L. S., The Catholic University of America B.A., Virginia Wesleyan College Wayne Truxillo M.B.A., Troy State University B.A., St. Leo University Martrena VanHevelingen M.S. M.I.S., Troy University BBA, Campbell University David K. Woodroof M.A., Old Dominion University B.S., Norfolk State University WISCONSIN Bayshore, Milwaukee and Wauwatosa ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Peter J. Pavone Director of the Milwaukee Colleges M.S., B.A., State University of New York Gregory Brandner Campus Director-Milwaukee West Campus M.S., United States Sports Academy B.A., University of Wisconsin, La Crosse Ronald Lonzo Campus Director-Milwaukee Bayshore Campus MPA., University of Wisconsin, Green Bay B.A., University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Stephen McEvoy Dean of Education AdministrationMilwaukee Market J.D., Western New England College School of Law B.A., State University of New York at Albany Catherine Rebholz Director of Bachelor Programs M.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.A., University of Hartford Brian Sporleder Dean of Student and Career Services-Milwaukee West Campus M.A., Ball State University BBA, University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Kristin Weiss Director of Admissions-Milwaukee Campus M.S., Colorado Technical University B.A., Eastern Illinois University Tony Krocak Director of Admissions-Milwaukee West Campus B.S., Minnesota State University Betty Erby Director of Career Services-Milwaukee Campus M.S.M., B.A., Cardinal Stritch University Lois Trongard Business Office Director-Milwaukee Market BBA, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Mary Meyer Director, Professional Skills Center M.S., Golden Gate University B.S., University of LaVerne A.S., Hawaii Pacific University Julie Strzyzewski Human Resources Manager-Milwaukee Market Assistant to the Director of the Milwaukee Colleges B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee AnnMarie Marlier Dean of Instruction-Milwaukee West Campus M.Ed., Carroll College B.A., St. Norbert College Melodie Fox Dean of Instruction-Milwaukee Campus M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee M.A., University of Illinois at Chicago B.A., University of St. Thomas Molly McKnight Dean of Instruction-Bayshore Campus M.A., Marquette University B.A., Wisconsin Lutheran College Steve Berry Director of Admissions-Bayshore Campus B.A., Central Washington University Daniel Basile Director of High School Admissions-Milwaukee Market M.A., B.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Julie Kimbler Dean of Student Services-Bayshore M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Monica Rodriguez Dean of Student Services-Milwaukee Campus M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Matthew Garmer Student Services Coordinator M.B.A., Western Illinois University B.A., Western Illinois University A.A., Johnwood Community College Brook Swanson Student Services Coordinator M.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S., University of Wisconsin, Superior Megan Schrader Human Resources Faculty Compliance Coordinator B.S., University of Wisconsin, La Crosse Melissa Kaye Executive Assistant to the Market Director B.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Ryan Ratajewski Marketing & Community Relations Coordinator B.A., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Janice Kamholtz Market Librarian M.L.S., B.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Lloyd G. Daub Librarian-Milwaukee Campus M.A., M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.A., Carroll College Mary Bird Librarian-Milwaukee Campus M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.A., Knox College Gretchen Peterson Librarian-Bayshore Campus M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison Jason Steagall Librarian-West Campus M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S., University of Wisconsin, Steven's Point Erin Jones Registrar M.S., Central Missouri State University B.A., University of Wisconsin, Parkside Mary Winkelman Registrar B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Andrea Broman Learning Resources Coordinator M.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S., Carroll College Robert Siever Associate Learning Resources Coordinator B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison Jean Strick Nursing Lab Coordinator B.S., Alverno College B.S.N, Marion College Bryan Edmonds Medical Lab Coordinator A.S., Vincennes University Ann Anundson Academic Advisor M.S.E, B.S., University of Wisconsin, Platteville Scott Boehmke Academic Advisor B.S., University of Wisconsin, La Crosse Rebecca Olsen Academic Advisor B.F.A., Harrington College 108 JANUARY 2010 * Denotes Full-Time Fredrick Pierce Academic Advisor B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Mary Schultz Academic Advisor M.A., University of South Carolina-Columbia B.S., University of Wisconsin-Steven's Point Marina Smith Academic Advisor B.A., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Gloria Saunders Academic Advisor B.A., Alverno College Jenny Wiencek Academic Advisor B.S., University of Wisconsin, Parkside Kevin McShane Financial Aid Manager-Milwaukee West Campus M.B.A., B.A., Cardinal Stritch University Katy Weisenburger Financial Aid Manager-Milwaukee Campus B.S., Marquette University Jordan Hickey Financial Aid Advisor B.S., Robert Morris College Danielle Lazzaro Financial Aid Advisor B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison Megan Kruschel Financial Aid Advisor B.A., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Greg Reed Financial Aid Advisor B.S., University of Wisconsin, La Crosse Stephen Schick Financial Aid Advisor B.S., Cardinal Stritch University Darin Wissbaum Financial Aid Advisor B.S., Iowa Lakes Community College A.A., University of Northern Iowa Kelly Zvacek Financial Aid Advisor B.S., University of Nebraska, Omaha Evan Beier Business Office Assistant BBA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Judy Wachholz Business Office Assistant B.S., City University of Seattle B.S., University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Kenyetta Hyler Administrative Assistant, Career Services Jill Marshall Associate Director of Career Services BBA, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Tara Henderson Career Services Representative M.B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., University of Wisconsin-Platteville Readonna Wilson M.B.A., Cardinal Stritch Career Services Representative B.A., Concordia University Brandon Alberti Admissions Representative B.A., Marquette University Linda Axtman Admissions Representative James Bush Jr. Admissions Representative Jake Criscione Admissions Representative Andrea Duffy A.A., Truman University Ivy Francis Admissions Representative A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Aaron Gholston Admissions Representative M.B.A., BBA, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Lindsey Haug Admissions Representative B.S., Carroll College Harry Hibner Senior Admissions Representative M.Ed., B.S., Marquette University Gwendolyn Luckett-Lewis Admissions Representative Abdul King Admissions Representative B.S., Southern Illinois University Peter Luke High School Coordinator A.A., Milwaukee Area Technical College Jennifer Johnson Admissions Representative-High School B.A., University Of Wisconsin-LaCrosse Joel Kasmarick Admissions Representative B.S., University of Wisconsin, Stout Joelynette McKee Admissions Representative B.A., Alverno College Jared McKeen Admissions Representative-High School BBA, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Julissa Morales Senior Admissions Representative B.S.W., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Lindsey Meyer Admissions Representative-High School Steven Schmidt High School Coordinator Kristin Thrall Admissions Representative B.A., University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Christopher Vahl High School Coordinator B.S., Carroll College Gary Heil I.T. Coordinator BBA, A.S., Bryant & Stratton College, Milwaukee Jacob Hoppe I.T. Assistant B.S., Concordia University Larry Norton I.T. Coordinator B.T., Rochester Institute of Technology Sara Van Nelson I.T. Coordinator M.S., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Jason Sparks I.T. Assistant A.S. Bryant & Stratton College Amy Kawczynski Assistant to the Director-HRC B.A., Marian College Holly Vanderbusch Assistant to the Director-HRC B.F.A., Milwaukee Art of Institute and Design Joelle Erickson Admissions Office Coordinator B.S. Cardinal Stritch University A.A. Bryant & Stratton College Linnea Harrington Administrative Assistant, Admissions A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Joyce Kaestner Administrative Assistant, Academics A.A., Spencerian Business College Connie Krolikowski Administrative Assistant, Nursing A.S., Cuyahoga Community College Lisa Olwig Admissions Office Coordinator B.A., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Alexis Outlaw Administrative Assistant Admission s A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Berry Lynn Wilson Administrative Assistant, Admissions B.A., Vander Community College Denise Jung Testing Coordinator-Milwaukee West A.S., Milwaukee Area Technical College Michael Staszewski Testing Center Coordinator-Milwaukee Campus B.S., AAS, Bryant & Stratton College Sharon VanKylen Tutor M.A., Cardinal Stritch University B.A., Alverno College Tushonda Coyhis Receptionist A.S., Bryant & Stratton College Laura Glapinski Receptionist B.A., University of Wisconsin-Steven's Point Katrina Peeples Receptionist Jacquelyn Strong Receptionist Truman Flaaten Maintenance & Facilities M.S., Illinois State of Technology B.S., Iowa State University Christopher McKinney Security/Maintenance FACULTY Richard Albers M.A., University of Kansas B.A., St. Benedicts College Griselda Aldrete* M.A., University of Nebraska-Omaha B.A., Marquette University Carin Anick-Quinones M.S.W., Florida National University B.S.W., University of South Florida Alexis Anthony* M.A., B.A., Alverno College Kyra Appling M.S., B.S., Springfield College Rosemarie Balistrieri M.S.W., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., Mount Mary College Janice Becker M.Ed., National-Louis University B.A., University of Wisconsin, Parkside Jeff Beder* M.L.I.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Angela Bester-Lambert* M.S., University of Wisconsin, Platteville B.A., University of Wisconsin, Parkside 109 JANUARY 2010 Vicki Bishop M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., University of Arizona Darrell Kevin Boland M.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., Longwood University-Farmville, VA Michael Boland M.S., Marquette University B.A., St. Norbert College Judy Bowen M.M., B.M., University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign William Bowen M.A., B.A., University of Iowa Jeremy Braun M.A., Marquette University B.A., Wisconsin Lutheran College Azael Brodhead M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison Yetunde Bronson* M.A., B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Robert Brown* M.S., B.S., California State University-Dominguez Hills Lauren Brown-Perry J.D., University of Illinois B.A., Lawrence University Karin Burton-Swietlik* M.A., B.A., Marquette University Jody Campbell M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.F.A., Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Kristin Catalano M.F.A., UCLA B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Thomas Chartrand D.C., Palmer College of Chiropractic Thomas Clark-Vollman M.L.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., Marquette University Cherri Conley M.A., B.A., Texas Tech University Catrina Crane M.S., Cardinal Stritch University B.A., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Annette Cross B.S., University of Phoenix Diploma, Medical Assisting, Rockford Business College Ann Daniel* M.S.N, B.S., BBA, Marion College B.S., College of St. Francis A.S., Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Rosemarie Delya* M.S.N., Governor's State University B.S.N., Valparasio University Stacey Durham M.S., B.S., Cardinal Stritch University Janine Eagon* M.S.N., B.S.N., Texas Woman's University - Denton, TX Kenneth Edington* M.S., Ohio State University B.S., Bowling State University B.S., National College of Chiropractic Michelle Ellefson* M.S.N., Marian University B.S.N., Marian University Jennifer Esch B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison B.S., University of Wisconsin, La Crosse Brenda Fay M.L.I.S., B.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Mark Flagg* M.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison B.A., Stonehill College * Denotes Full-Time Nancy Fletcher M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., University of Colorado Amy Frohwirth* M.Ed., B.S., Carroll College Michael Geary J.D., Marquette University B.A., University of Notre Dame Antonio Guajardo* M.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S., Mount Senario College James Hader B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison Christina Hagen M.A., Minnesota State University B.A., Bethany Lutheran College Michelle Harrell Washington M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison Craig Hedgley PhD, Capella University M.S., Springfield College B.A., Mount Senario College Teresa Heier M.L.I.S., B.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Justin Hern* M.S., Sacred Heart University B.S., Regis University A.S., Cardinal Stritch University Brent Hesprich B.F.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Janet Hinz M.A., Johns Hopkins University B.A., Marquette University David Hippensteel M.S., Northeast Louisiana University B.S., Millersville University Becki Jo Hirschy* M.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh B.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Madison Cherion Holder* M.S.N., B.S.N., Concordia University Timothy Holloway M.B.A., Concordia University B.S., Xavier University of Louisiana Qingtang Hu M.S., M.S., Marquette University B.S., East China Normal University Kevin Johns M.B.A., Benedictine University B.B.A., College of St. Francis Jeffrey Johnson M.A.E., Marian College M.A., Middlebury College B.A., Quincy University Marnee Johnson M.S., Marian College B.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Gregory Jonas M.P.A., B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Roberta Kahn M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison Linda Karlheim M.S., Cardinal Stritch University B.A., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Natasha King M.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.A., Ripon College Eleanore Kirsch* M.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S.N., Marquette University Laura Klein M.B.A., BBA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 110 Vladislava Kleyman M.S.W., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., Kishinev State Teachers Training UniversityMoldova Shirley Knight M.S., B.S., University of St. Francis Kyle Knoke M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin-Parkside Scott Knop M.B.A., Northern Illinois University BBA, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Nancy Kojis R.N., State of Wisconsin Diploma of Nursing, Deaconess Hospital M.A. Diploma, Kenosha Technical Institute B.S.N., Mount Senario College Jason Kolodzyk M.A., B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Aaron Konkol L.L.M., DePaul University J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Jeanette Kowalik M.P.H., Northern Illinois University B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Donna Kowske* M.S.N., University of Phoenix B.A., University of Parkside Kimberly Kubricky M.S., Cardinal Stritch University B.S., Mount Mary College A.O.S., Milwaukee Area Technical College Bernard Kupper M.S., Marian University B.S., Mount Senario College Brenda Kutzke* M.S.N., Sacred Heart University B.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire Joanna Ledvina M.S.W., B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Linda LeVeille M.L.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., University of Wisconsin-Platteville Bill Lind* M.Ed., B.S.E., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater Tamara Long M.M., University of Phoenix B.F.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Traci MacLeod M.S.W., B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee LaQuanda Madison M.S., Springfield College B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Nader Mahdi M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., Al-Azhar University William Malone M.L.S., B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Daniel Maloney* Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley B.A., Stanford University Elizabeth P. Markham* Ph.D., M.S.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill B.S., Emory University B.A., Erskine College Laurie Materna* Ph.D., Capella University M.S.N., University of Wiscsonsin-Milwaukee B.S.N., Alverno College Lennis Mathews B.A., Iowa State University Susan McCarthy M.Ed., Lynchburg College B.A., Augustana College JANUARY 2010 Kimberly McFadden M.S., University of Wisconsin, Whitewater BBA, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Tiffany Miner M.B.A., Concordia University B.S., Lakeland College Jennifer Morgan* B.S.N., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Regina Mosby* M.S.N., Walden University B.S.N., Villanova University Robert Nailen J.D., University of Mississippi B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Paul Nault M.S.E.D., University of Wisconsin-La Crosse B.S., University of Wisconsin-Parkside Pamela Nellen M.B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., University of Southern Mississippi Kevin Nettesheim M.A., Marquette University B.A., St. Norbert College Robert Newman D.C., B.S., National University of Health Sciences Erin Nitka M.A., Marquette University B.A., St. Norbert College Jeffrey Norman J.D., Marquette University B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Kathleen Olewinski* M.S., Cardinal Stritch University Eileen Pape B.S., Mount Mary College Sheila Parrish-Spence J.D., North Carolina Central University B.S., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Oscar Perez M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., Mount Scenario College Kathy Pettit* M.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S. University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Kimberly Purifoy M.Ed., Cardinal Stritch University B.A., Marquette University Marc Rausch M.B.A., Keller Graduate School of Management B.S., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Austin Reece Deward Reece D.C., Texas Chiropractic College Joseph Rein M.A., University of Nebraska B.A., University of Minnesota Danielle Robel M.B.A., B.A., Concordia University Mary Pat Rohde* M.A., B.A., Mount Mary College Robert Rose M.S., B.S., University of Phoenix Dean Roseland M.S., Concordia University B.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout Marcy Rux* M.S.N., M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison B.S., Baylor College of Medicine Khaled Sabha* M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Matthew Schigur M.B.A., Keller Graduate School B.S., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater John Schill M.S., Concordia University B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Aaron Schmalzle B.A., Wittenberg University Marie Scott M.S.N., B.S.N., University of Wisconsin-Madison Russell Seager M.S.N., B.S.N., Marquette University B.S., B.A., Cardinal Stritch University Richard Silberman M.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison Delbert Slowik M.S.N., B.S.N., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Christopher Smith J.D., Marquette University BBA, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Susan Smith BSN, Alverno College Ericka Smyth* M.E.P.D., Cardinal Stritch University B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison Patricia Sorcic* M.A.,Western Kentucky University B.S., University of Wisconsin, La Crosse Kelby Spann M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., Iowa State University Brian Spector* A.B.D., Loyola University M.A., University of Chicago B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison Steven Spingola M.A., Marquette University M.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.S., Mount Senario College Barbara Stave M.S., Cardinal Stritch University BBA, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Linda Stefaniak M.S.N., University of Phoenix B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison A.D.N., Milwaukee Area Technical College Rosemarie Stelzer M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison William Stikl M.S., Silver Lake College B.S., Mount Senario College Justin Stiper M.A., University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison Dianna Susitti M.S.W., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire Telashay Swope-Farr* M.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S., Rust College Ivorena Taylor M.A., B.A., Clark Atlanta University Sherry Terrell-Webb J.D., Marquette University B.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Johnny Thomas M.B.A., Cardinal Stritch University B.B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Blair Thorpe M.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin-Steven's Point Theresa Toser* M.S.N., University of Phoenix B.S.N., Carroll College A.D.N., Madison Area Technical College Leolia Townsend M.S., Marian College M.A., B.A., Alverno College Elizabeth Vann Wenner M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Gerilyn Voboril* B.S.N., A.D.N., Cardinal Stritch University Eric Volmar M.L.I.S., M.S., B.A., University of WisconsinMilwaukee Robert Webb Jr. J.D., Marquette University B.S., Illinois State University Michael Weber M.S., B.S., Marquette University Paul Werkowski J.D., Thomas M. Cooley Law School B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Rayford Weston M.S., B.S., Springfield College Carol Whelpley* M.S.N., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee B.S.N., Cornell University Jana White M.A., B.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Tamia Wiley* M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S., University of Wisconsin, Parkside Carla Williams Ph.D., Capella University M.E.P.D., Cardinal Stritch University B.S., Springfield College Crystal Williams M.S., B.S., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Gregory Williams M.Ed., National Louis University BBA, Tennessee State University Richard Wojciechowski M.B.A., Cardinal Stritch University B.S.N., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee R.N., State of Wisconsin Jamie Zwicky* M.S.N., Concordia University B.S.N., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Heather Zydek M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign B.S., Illinois State University B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 111 JANUARY 2010 ONLINE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Doreen Justinger Vice President/Internet Services M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Cathy Lawson Dean of Instructional Administration M.S.Ed. SUNY Brockport B.A. State University of New York College at Brockport Lori Panaro Dean of Instructional Technology S.D.L., State University of New York at Buffalo M.S.Ed., D'Youville College B.F.A., Niagara University Karen Chapman Dean of Instruction M.B.A Wayland Baptist University B.S., Park University Christine Gaiser Dean of Student Services M.A., B.S., State University of New York, Empire State College Allison Barley Associate Dean of Student Services M.A., Medaille College B.S., State University of New York College at Geneseo Cheryl Talty Business Office Director B.S., Houghton College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Carrie McCooey Financial Services Manager A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Scott Traylor Director of Admissions M.B.A., B.S., Liberty University Jonathan Blair Director of Internet Architecture B.S., Alfred University Daniel Boyd Bookstore Manager Melissa Nolan Academic Advisor M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York College at Fredonia Malinda Stulba Academic Advisor M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Kathryn Grow Academic Advisor B.A., State University of New York College at Geneseo Michelle Burger Academic Advisor B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Caprice Arabia Registrar B.S. Walden University A.A.S, Herkimer County Community College Leah MacVie Instructional Technologist B.F.A. State University of New York at Buffalo Donald Lando Admissions Supervisor M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Jessica Blackmer Qualifications Center Supervisor B.A., Canisius College 112 JANUARY 2010 Stephanie Leidolph Admissions Representative A.S., Erie Community College Jason Morrison Data Analyst B.S., State University of New York College at Fredonia A.A.S, Jamestown Community College Michelle Peccia Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Megan Scott Admissions Representative B.S., Southern Illinois University Sean Kennedy Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry Crystal Kardys Admissions Representative B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Ann Shaul Senior Admissions Representative Kimberly Baker Support Services Coordinator A.O.S., Bryant and Stratton College Kelly Sustakoski Campus Support Associate B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Cindy Whitney Support Services Administrative Assistant A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Kristen Gill Support Services Assistant B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Joel Dell Technical Support George Kilpatrick Web Developer B.S., American Intercontinental University Michelle Williams Financial Services Advisor B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo A.A., Erie Community College Kristina Rogers Financial Services Advisor BBA, A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Khala Johnson Financial Services Advisor B.S., Keuka College Colleen Fox Financial Services Assistant B.S., Medaille College Amanda Cappano Financial Services Assistant A.A.S., Hilbert College Allison Sufflita Financial Services Assistant B.S., State University of New York at Buffalo Rick Kraft Associate Admissions Representative B.S., Medaille College Debra Moynihan Associate Admission Representative B.S.W., SUNY College at Buffalo A.A., Mt San Jacinto College A.S., Erie Community College Jacob Beiter Associate Admissions Representative B.A., Medaille College John Kovacevich Associate Admissions Representative A.A.S., Erie Community College Jill Lonie Associate Admissions Representative B.A., Niagara University A.A.S., Erie Community College FACULTY Paul Alatorre M.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo M.S., B.A., University of Tennessee Andrew Beyer M.A., Keller Graduate School of Management B.S., Devry University Paul Blake M.B.A., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Cynthia Boals M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Jillian Boals M.S. B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Monica Brathwate M.A., Brooklyn College Kevin Breen M.L.S., Queens College B.A., Old Dominion College Dawn Brown M.S., Boston University B.A., Southern Illinois University Tonya Burton M.B.A., Hampton University B.S., Florida University Tamara Butler* M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Lisa Callan M.B.A., B.A., Northern Arizona University Vance Carpenter M.S., George Washington University Joseph Ceccarelli M.S., University of Phoenix B.S., Houghton College Karen Chapman* M.B.A., Wayland Baptist University B.S., Park University Nicole Chiarella* M.S., Boston University B.S., State University of New York Empire State College Catherine Debbins M.S., B.A., State University of New York at Buffalo Doreen DiCarlo* M.B.A., LeMoyne College B.P.S., Cazenovia College Kathy Dilmore* M.B.A., B.S., Clarkson University A.O.S., Tompkins Community College Ellen Divens* M.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Stacey Durham M.S., B.S., Cardinal Stritch University A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Dan Filipkowski M.A., Villanova University B.A., Cleveland State University * Denotes Full-Time 113 JANUARY 2010 Deborah Franklin M.S., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.A.S, Erie Community College Judy Garner M.S.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth UniversityB.A., Virginia Tech Brian Gilmore M.A., Webster University B.S., Wayland Baptist University Matthew Grasela M.A., Medaille College B.A., Canisius College Christine Greene M.S., D'Youville College B.S., Houghton College Kimberley Harris M.L.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College Brooke Henderson J.D., B.A., College of William & Mary Jenny Heilborn M.A., University of Virginia at Richmond James Allan Jackson* M.A.., University of South Florida B.A., Oglethorpe University A.A., Valencia Community College Scott Kaplan M.L.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo B.A. New England College Eugene Kaufman M.B.A., B.S., California State University Sarah Kenehan M.A., University of Tennessee B.A., B.S., University of Scranton Carol Kowalik M.L.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Amber Krasny M.B.A., B.A., Walden University Elizabeth Kropf M.A., Perelandra College B.A., Christian Heritage College Tanya Kuzylak M.L.S., State University of New York at Buffalo B.S., Rochester Institute of Technology Robin Laukhuf* M.B.A., B.S., Lake Erie College Florence (Beth) Lennert M.S.Ed., Canisius College B.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo Michael Leone J.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Law B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport Carrie Maciejewski M.B.A., St. Bonaventure University B.S., Canisius College Karen Macris* M.B.A., Medaille College Marrin Maher M.S.Ed., Central Michigan University B.S., Bluefield College Robert Maher M.A., George Washington University M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University B.S., Old Dominion University Mark McBride M.L.S., B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Patricia McColm D.C., Cleveland Chiropractic College Demetrius McCord J.D., Albany Law School of Union University Clyde Middleton J.D., Santa Clara University B.A., Southern New Hampshire University Michael Millstone Ph.D., Capella University M.B.A., Webster University Tiffany Miner M.B.A., Concordia University B.S., Lakeland College A.O.S., Bryant & Stratton College Erin Nitka M.A., Marquette University B.A., St. Norbert College Susan Olney* M.B.A., LeMoyne College; B.P.S., Cazenovia College Steven Opalat* M.A., Florida Atlantic University B.A., Syracuse University Lori Panaro* S.D.L., State University of New York at Buffalo M.S.Ed., D'Youville College B.F.A., Niagara University Richard Pawarski J.D., State University of New York College at Buffalo M.A., Keller Graduate School of Management B.S., Canisius College Larry Ramsey M.B.A., Averett College B.S., Auburn University Gary Reinke M.B.A., Central Michigan University B.S., University of Wisconsin Catherine Rice D.C., Northwestern University M.S., State University of New York College at Potsdam B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Cindy Rippe* M.B.A., Milsaps College B.S., University of Florida A.A., Broward Community College Julianne Rizzo M.S., Canisius College B.A., State University of New York College at Buffalo Gregory Rosko J.D., Cleveland-Marshall College of Law M.A., University of Denver B.A., John Carroll University Brandy Santella* M.S.Ed., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo A.S., Genesee Community College Richard Schnoll M.A., University of Illinois B.A., University of Wisconsin Kim Schulz M.S., St. Bonaventure University B.S., D'Youville College Carol Schwartz M.S.,M.L.S., Syracuse University Tracy Sedor* M.A., Cleveland State University B.A., Bowling Green State University Tim Sheldon* M.F.A., University of Virginia B.A., University of Virginia Michael Skiba M.B.A., State University of New York at Albany B.S., College of St. Rose Erin Smith Ph.D., University of London B.A., University of California Riverside Laura Soldani* M.A.Ed., University of Phoenix B.S., Bellevue University Michael Stankowski M.B.A., University of Phoenix B.S., Canisius College Christine Stymus M.S., Troy State University B.S., Bluefield College Janet Thompson* Ph.D., Capella University M.A., B.A., Cleveland State University Blair Thorpe M.A., Cardinal Stritch University M.A., University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee B.A., University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point Michael Tillman J.D., City of New York School of Law M.L.S., Wayne State University B.A., University of Michigan Steven Traubert J.D., West Virginia University College of Law B.A., University of Notre Dame Jill Travers M.A., State University of New York College at Brockport B.S., University of South Dakota Richard Trowbridge Ph.D., Union Institute and University M.A. Norwich University Jerome Tuttle M.A., University of Virginia B.A., Queens College Debra Tyson* M.B.A., Averett College B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University David Usinski M.A.,B.S., State University of New York College at Brockport M.S., Pennsylvania State University Fawn vonFrohling M.A., Portland State University B.A., University of Oregon Stephanie Wachalec M.L.I.S., Kent State University M.F.A., B.F.A., Ohio University Jillian Wall M.S.Ed., B.S., State University of New York College at Oswego Todd Wolfe M.B.A., B.S., State University of New York College at Buffalo Li (Julie) Zhu M.L.S., Syracuse University M..S.Ed., Northeast China Normal University B.S., Jiangxing Normal University Bryant & Stratton College Campuses New York Campuses Albany 1259 Central Avenue Albany, NY 12205 Tel: 518/437-1802 Amherst Audubon Business Centre 40 Hazelwood Drive Amherst, NY 14228 Tel: 716/691-0012 Buffalo 465 Main Street, 4th Floor Buffalo, NY 14203 Tel: 716/884-9120 Greece 150 Bellwood Drive Rochester, NY 14606 Tel: 585/720-0660 Henrietta 1225 Jefferson Road Rochester, NY 14623 Tel: 585/292-5627 Southtowns Sterling Park 200 Redtail Orchard Park, NY 14127 Tel: 716/677-9500 Syracuse 953 James Street Syracuse, NY 13203 Tel: 315/472-6603 Syracuse North 8687 Carling Road Liverpool, NY 13090 Tel: 315/652-6500 Virginia Campuses Richmond 8141 Hull Street Road Richmond, VA 23235 Tel: 804/745-2444 Virginia Beach 301 Centre Pointe Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23462 Tel: 757/499-7900 Ohio Campuses Cleveland Downtown 1700 East 13th Street Cleveland, OH 44114 Tel: 216/771-1700 Eastlake 35350 Curtis Boulevard Eastlake, OH 44095 Tel: 440/510-1112 Parma 12955 Snow Road Parma, OH 44130 Tel: 216/265-3151 Wisconsin Campuses Milwaukee 310 West Wisconsin Avenue Suite 500 East Milwaukee, WI 53203 Tel: 414/276-5200 Wauwatosa 10950 W. Potter Road Wauwatosa, WI 53226 Tel: 414/302-7000 Bayshore 500 Silver Spring Rd. Suite K340 Glendale, WI 53217 Tel: 414/961-9600 ...
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2010 for the course CATALOG 1 taught by Professor General during the Fall '10 term at Bryant & Stratton.

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