04 Cognitive models of depression

04 Cognitive models - COGNITIVE MODELS OF MOOD DISORDERS 1 Psy 423 Mood Disorders Paula Yanes and Chrystal Vergara COGNITIVE MODEL Cognitive

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 C OGNITIVE M ODELS OF M OOD D ISORDERS Psy 423: Mood Disorders Paula Yanes and Chrystal Vergara 1 COGNITIVE MODEL Cognitive Approaches to Depression: Cognitions cause mood Negative cognitions cause negative mood Depression is characterized by pervasive distorted(?) negative cognition Can make one vulnerable to depression Can also play role in maintenance and recurrence of disorder 2 COGNITIVE MODEL OF DEPRESSION Mood 3 Cognitions (thoughts)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 DIATHESIS-STRESS MODEL: COGNITIVE STYLE Presence of cognitive style Cognitive style (diathesis) needs to be activated by stressful events Cognitive style (diathesis) influences how stressful life event (stress) is interpreted If interpretation is negative or dysfunctional, could lead to depression Different degree of cognitive vulnerability Not all individuals will be negatively impacted by stressful event Different domains for cognitive vulnerability Personally meaningful 4 COGNITIVE MODEL OF DEPRESSION Event Mood 5 Cognitions (thoughts) DIATHESIS-STRESS MODEL: PERSONALITY Two common personality types: Sociotropy/Interpersonal Relatedness Autonomy/Self definition Autonomy/Self-definition Personality x Stressor Depression Individual will react to stressor depending on personality and type of stressor 6
Background image of page 2
3 DIATHESIS-STRESS MODEL: COGNITIVE REACTIVITY Two major cognitive vulnerability models: Helplessness/Hopelessness Helplessness/Hopelessness Theory (Seligman) Cognitive Attributional Style Beck’s Cognitive Theory Negative Schema 7 HELPLESSNESS/HOPELESSNESS THEORY OF DEPRESSION Hopelessness Theory: Cognitive attributions one makes for events Martin Seligman (1975) Animal model : Learned helplessness in dogs Human depression : Uncontrollable negative events in environment that cannot control leads to “hopelessness depression” Symptoms of “Hopelessness Depression” Sadness, retarded initiation of voluntary responses, suicidality, low energy, apathy, psychomotor retardation, sleep disturbance, poor concentration, negative cognitions 8 HOPELESSNESS THEORY OF DEPRESSION Not all affected 1/3 of dogs did not become helpless Depends on inferences made 3 types of inferences: 1) Causal attributions, 2) Inferred consequences, 3) Inferred characteristics of self Types of inferences make will depend on attribution style Attributional Style: Stable v. Unstable Global v. Specific Internal v. External 9
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 HOPELESSNESS THEORY OF DEPRESSION - CAUSAL CHAIN Negative Event- Hopeless Symptoms of Failed test 10 Negative Event Specific Inferences A. Stable- Global causes B. Negative Consequences C. Negative Self- characteristics Negative Cognitive Style -ness Hopelessness Depression A. Low intelligence B. Won’t go to med school C. Dumb person Stable, Global, Internal BECK’S COGNITIVE THEORY
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/04/2010 for the course SOC 101 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '06 term at SUNY Buffalo.

Page1 / 11

04 Cognitive models - COGNITIVE MODELS OF MOOD DISORDERS 1 Psy 423 Mood Disorders Paula Yanes and Chrystal Vergara COGNITIVE MODEL Cognitive

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online