Week7 - On "War, Race, and the Meaning of Citizenship,...

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On “War, Race, and the Meaning of Citizenship, 1941-1988” Asian American Studies 20A Professor Catherine Ceniza Choy
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From Linda Espana-Maram, Creating Masculinity in Los Angeles’s Little Manila: Working-Class Filipinos and Popular Culture, 1920s-1950s (Columbia University Press, 2006), p. 143 “For most Asian Americans and Asian immigrants, the experiences of the war years were linked to changing socioeconomic fortunes and rights to naturalization and American citizenship as well as dilemmas about the ‘homeland.’ For Asians in the United States, World War II represented, depending on whether one was Korean, Chinese, Filipino, or Japanese, a period of revolutionary changes, mixed blessings, or abject denial of justice.”
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Asian Americans, Racial Formation, and WWII Mary Paik Lee recalled how “even after all the Japanese were taken away to concentration camps, other Orientals were subject to all kinds of violence. They were afraid to go out at night; many were beaten even during the day. Their cars were wrecked. The tires were slashed, the radios and batteries removed. Some friends driving on the highways were stopped and their cars were overturned. It was a bad time for all of us.” Korean Americans and Chinese Americans, wore badges and buttons that claimed that they were “Korean” and “Chinese,” not Japanese
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Watershed of World War II Employment Opportunities 1941, FDR’s Executive Order 8802 prohibits racial discrimination in employment Employment opportunities for Asian Americans such as Chinese and Filipino Americans in defense industries and offices
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“On The Ferry - [Chinese American] Day Workers Returning To San Francisco From Richmond” (1943) From Oakland Museum Collection on Calisphere
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Watershed of World War II U.S. Citizenship 1943- Chinese exclusion acts repealed and naturalization rights granted 1943- 1200 Filipinos receive citizenship at Camp Beale for U.S. military service 1946- Luce-Cellar Act enable Filipinos and Asian Indians to become U.S. citizens
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“Portrait of Anacieto Soriano, Sr. (at right) and unidentified friend wearing their 1st Filipino Infantry Regiment uniforms from World War II.” (circa 1945) From Anaheim Public Library collection on Calisphere
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2010 for the course ASAMST 3242 taught by Professor Choy during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Week7 - On "War, Race, and the Meaning of Citizenship,...

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