Week+1 - Framing Asian American History Asian American...

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Framing Asian American History Asian American Studies 20A Introduction to the History of Asians in the United States Professor Catherine Ceniza Choy
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Primary Sources versus Secondary Sources From http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/instruct/guides/ primarysources .html What are Primary Sources? Primary sources enable the researcher to get as close as possible to what actually happened during an historical event or time period. Primary sources were either created during the time period being studied, or were created at a later date by a participant in the events being studied (as in the case of memoirs) and they reflect the individual viewpoint of a participant or observer. What Are Secondary Sources? A secondary source is a work that interprets or analyzes an historical event or phenomenon. It is generally at least one step removed from the event. Examples include scholarly or popular books and articles, reference books, and textbooks.
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Roger Daniels’s essay Daniels argues that Angel Island should be an important
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2010 for the course ASAMST 3242 taught by Professor Choy during the Spring '10 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Week+1 - Framing Asian American History Asian American...

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