Weeks9+and+11 - On “Asian Americans and the Cold War,...

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Unformatted text preview: On “Asian Americans and the Cold War, 1945-1965 and Post-1965 Immigration and Asian America” Asian American Studies 20A Professor Catherine Ceniza Choy Cold War and Asian Migrations to the U.S. • International adoption is a category of migration traceable to the Korean War • Approximately 200,000 children have been sent to the US and another 50,000 to Europe, where they make up the largest ethnic Korean community in that region Cold War and Asian Migrations to the U.S. (Continued) • Military brides comprise another category of migration traceable to World War II and the Cold War • Since 1950, more than 100,000 Korean military brides have immigrated to the United States • The majority of Korean immigration to the US during the 1970s and 1980s can be traced to military brides • It is estimated that military brides are directly or indirectly responsible for bringing 40 to 50 percent of all Korean immigrants since 1965 • See Ji-Yeon Yuh, Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America (New York: New York University Press, 2002) Challenges faced by Japanese and other Asian Military Brides • Bureaucratic obstacles such as paperwork from both the U.S. and Japanese governments • Ostracized by Japanese people who perceive military brides as national traitors • Ostracized by Japanese Americans who especially looked down upon Japanese women who married white and black servicemen as immoral • Psychosocial isolation and alienation from the language barrier and social exclusion • Lack of support and at times physical and verbal abuse from their American husbands Tribute to Chris Mensalvas From the On-line Carlos Bulosan Exhibit http://www.bulosan.org/html/organizers.html • June 24, 1909 - April 11, 1978 • "I was born when American occupation of the Philippines was fully consolidated and the English language imposed in public schools.” • He arrived in the U.S. in 1927 at age 18. • Between the years 1949-1959, Chris was president of ILWU's Local 37, the Filipino Alaskeros cannery workers union. • His life and work inspired writer Carlos Bulosan and labor union leader Philip Vera Cruz, who became the United Farm Workers vice-president in the 1970s. From Biography of Carlos Bulosan From the On-line Carlos Bulosan Exhibit http://www.bulosan.org/html/bulosan_biography.html • Carlos Bulosan was born in the Philippines in the rural farming village. • He arrived in Seattle on July 22, 1930 at the age of 18....
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2010 for the course ASAMST 3242 taught by Professor Choy during the Spring '10 term at Berkeley.

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Weeks9+and+11 - On “Asian Americans and the Cold War,...

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