Measurement_Lab_Experiment2_Damped_Beam_Vibration_Spring_2010

Measurement_Lab_Experiment2_Damped_Beam_Vibration_Spring_2010

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Spring 2010 CEE 291 – LABORATORY MEASUREMENT EXPERIMENT 2 DAMPED BEAM VIBRATION Vibration of beams and other structural members is very important to the understanding and analysis of the stability of a structure (e.g., building, bridge, ear drum), to the safety of a vehicle (e.g., space craft, automobile) and its components (e.g., engine, drive shaft, tire), to musical instruments, and many devices. Vibrations are motions of an object about an equilibrium point and maybe periodic (e.g., tuning fork, pendulum) or random (e.g., vehicle on bumpy road). Vibrations are sometimes desireable (e.g., tuning fork, cone of loudspeaker) but generally are undesireable (e.g., noise, imbalance of rotating parts), as they cause unwanted sound and waste energy. Vibrations are free (mechanical system [e.g., swing, tuning fork] receives an initial input and vibrates at one or more of its natural frequencies until motion is attenuated or forced (alternating force or motion applied to a mechanical system [e.g., ground motion due to earthquake, shaking of washing machine due to imbalanced loading of clothes]). In this experiment, the magnitude of vibration of cantilever beams of different materials and lengths will be measured and analyzed to determine the natural frequencies of vibration, damping coefficient, and modulus of
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This note was uploaded on 05/04/2010 for the course CEE 291 taught by Professor Hoopes during the Spring '10 term at University of Wisconsin.

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Measurement_Lab_Experiment2_Damped_Beam_Vibration_Spring_2010

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