Lecture3_16 - 3/16/2010 Chapter 19 A lipid is an organic...

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3/16/2010 1 Chapter 19 A lipid is an organic compound found in living organisms that is insoluble (or only sparingly soluble) in water but soluble in non-polar organic solvents. Unlike other biomolecules, lipids do not have common structural features that serves as the basis for defining such compounds.
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3/16/2010 2 Lipids exhibit structural diversity. Some are esters, some are amides, and some are alcohols (acyclic and cyclic) and some are polycyclic. For purposes of simplicity of study lipids are divided into five categories based on their function: Energy-storage lipids - triacylglycerols Membrane lipids - phospholipids, sphingoglycolipids, and cholesterol Emulsification lipids - bile acids Chemical messenger lipids - steroid hormones and eicosanoids) Protective-coating lipids - biological waxes
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3 A fatty acid is a naturally occurring monocarboxylic acid. Two Types: Saturated (SFAs) - all C-C bonds are single bonds Unsaturated Monounsaturated (MUFAs): one C=C bond Polyunsaturated (PUFAs): 2 or more C=C bonds A monounsaturated fatty acid is a fatty acid with a carbon chain in which one carbon carbon double bond is present. Different ways of depicting the structure
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2010 for the course CHM 1031 taught by Professor Gow during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture3_16 - 3/16/2010 Chapter 19 A lipid is an organic...

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