05_Dijkstra - 15.082 and 6.855J February 20, 2003...

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1 15.082 and 6.855J February 20, 2003 Dijkstra’s Algorithm for the Shortest Path Problem
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2 Wide Range of Shortest Path Problems Sources and Destinations We will consider single source problems in this lecture Properties of the costs. We will consider non-negative cost coefficients in this lecture Network topology. We will consider all directed graphs
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3 Assumptions for the Problem Today Integral, non-negative data There is a directed path from source node s to all other nodes. Objective: find the shortest path from node s to each other node. Applications. Vehicle routing Communication systems
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4 Overview of today’s lecture One nice application (see the book for more) Dijkstra’s algorithm animation proof of correctness (invariants) time bound Dial’s algorithm (a way of implementing Dijkstra’s algorithm) animation time bound
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5 Approximating Piecewise Linear Functions INPUT: A piecewise linear function n points a 1 = (x 1 ,y 1 ), a 2 = (x 2 ,y 2 ),. .., a n = (x n ,y n ). x 1 x 2 ... x n . Objective: approximate f with fewer points c* is the “cost” per point included c ij = cost of approximating the function through points a i , a i+1 , . . ., a jj by a single line joining point a i to point a j . Find the minimum cost path from node 1 to node n. Each path from 1 to n corresponds to an approximation of the data points a 1 to a n .
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6 c i,j is the cost of deleting points a i+1 , …, a j-1 x a 1 a 3 a a 4 a 5 a 6 a 8 a 7 a 10 a 9 f(x) f (x) 1 f (x) 2 a 1 a 2 a 3 a 4 a 5 a 6 a 7 a 8 a 9 a 1 0 1 3 c 1,3 10 2 4 6 5 7 8 9 a 1 a 2 a 3 e.g., c 1,3 = -c* + dist of a 2 to the line c 3,5 c 5,7 c 7,10
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7 A Key Step in Shortest Path Algorithms In this lecture, and in subsequent lectures, we let d( ) denote a vector of temporary distance labels. d(i) is the length of some path from the origin node 1 to node i. Procedure Update(i) for each (i,j) A(i) do if d(j) > d(i) + c ij then d(j) : = d(i) + c ij and pred(j) : = i; Update(i) used in Dijkstra’s algorithm and in the label correcting algorithm
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8 Update(7) 1 8 2 7 1 3 2 0 1 4 6 9 5 3 1
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2010 for the course EE 15.082 taught by Professor Orlin during the Spring '10 term at Visayas State University.

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05_Dijkstra - 15.082 and 6.855J February 20, 2003...

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