Chapter 7- minerals - Chapter 7 - Minerals Minerals Solid,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 - Minerals Minerals Solid, Do not contain carbon Are not broken down by chemical processes like digestion Able to carry an electrical charge -Major minerals, 100 or more mg/day are needed -Trace minerals, Less than 100 mg/day are needed -Selenium, fluoride, iodine, chromium, manganese, iron, zinc, copper Electrolytes: sodium, potassium, chloride, phosphorus Metabolism: chromium, manganese, sulfur, iodine, selenium Blood: iron, zinc, copper Bone: calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, fluoride Body fluid is composed of: Water Electrolytes: mineral salts dissolved in water, including: Sodium, Potassium, Chloride, and Phosphorus -Potassium and phosphorus are typically inside -Sodium and chloride are typically outside Electrolytes have many different functions in the body - Form ions- electrically charged particles that carry electrical current - Stimulate nerves to transmit messages and muscles to contract - Maintain fluid balance because they strongly attract water
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sodium -Functions of sodium: - Fluid and electrolyte balance - Associated with blood pressure and pH balance in the body - Required for nerve impulse transmission - Assists in the transport of certain nutrients into body cells -Recommended intake: AI is 1.5 g/day (a little more than 1/2 a teaspoon) Upper limit 2400 mg/day US average +3300 mg/day -Sources of sodium: Processed foods are surprisingly high in sodium. Hypertension High blood pressure - not necessarily cause by sodium but hypertension is more common in people who consume more sodium DASH diet ("Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension") -Increase of fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and low fat dairy -Reduction in butter, red fatty meat, and sodium -Magnesium, potassium, calcium, protein, fiber -High sodium diets increase calcium in the urine Hyponatremia Because of Low blood sodium levels -Water intoxication Potassium - Functions of potassium: - Balance of fluids and sodium - Very important for muscle contractions and transmission of nerve impulses - High potassium intake helps maintain a lower blood pressure - Recommended intake AI for adults is 4.7 g/day - Sources of potassium - Processed foods are usually low in potassium - Fresh fruit, vegetables, and whole grains are good sources of potassium *Potassium toxicity is rare in healthy people because the kidneys excrete the excess
Background image of page 2
* Potassium defiencey is also rare but can occur in patients with kidney disfunction Chloride - Functions of chloride: - Assists with maintaining fluid balance - Assists with the immune system in killing bacteria - Assists in the transmission of nerve impulses - Sources of chloride: Salt present in foods Some fruits and vegetables Chromium Chromium is: - A trace mineral - Important in carbohydrate metabolism - Glucose Tolerance Factor - Found especially in mushrooms, prunes, dark chocolate, nuts, whole grains, and cereals *Not toxic and rarely deficient in the U.S. Manganese
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

Chapter 7- minerals - Chapter 7 - Minerals Minerals Solid,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online