- The need for a theory of right or wrong action in particular we need a first principle of ethics to settle conflicts between all other ethical

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TRAD 104 Introduction to Utilitarianism I. The Chief Proponents of Classical Utilitarianism: Bentham and Mill A. Bentham’s Principle of Utility: promote happiness, avoid unhappiness. B. The Principle of Utility appealed to Bentham and Mill as a principle of social reform II. The Logical Structure of Utilitarianism A. Utilitarian theories are consequentialist : they make the rightness or wrongness, goodness or badness of an action depend solely on the consequences of that action. B. All forms of utilitarianism have to specify some goal in terms the promotion of which actions are assessed: classical utilitarianism specifies as the goal the most happiness of the greatest number of people, where happiness is identified with pleasure and the absence of pain. III. Introduction to Mill’s Utilitarianism A.
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Unformatted text preview: The need for a theory of right or wrong action: in particular, we need a first principle of ethics to settle conflicts between all other ethical principles. B. “The greatest happiness principle” and its “theory of life”: an action is right to the extent that it promotes happiness, wrong to the extent that it promotes the opposite of happiness; the only things “desirable as ends” are pleasure and freedom from pain. For next Monday, April 19, read: Mill, Utilitarianism , the rest of Ch. II , What is Mill's account of pleasure? Of the objections to utilitarianism that Mill considers which do you think is the best? State the objection, and Mill's response to it (in your own words, as clearly as you can). OVER THIS WEEKEND, THERE WILL BE A D2L QUIZ ON THIS READING ASSIGNMENT...
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2010 for the course TRAD justice an taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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