Trad 104 lecture 1 - articulate the a priori principles on which morality rests III The Will as Practical Reason A Practical reason is the capacity

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rad 104 March 22, 2010 Introductory Lecture to Kant’s Groundwork : the Age of Reason and the Will as Practical Reason I. Kant as an Enlightenment figure — his general philosophical project is to give a qualified defense of Reason through a Copernican Revolution. II. Kant’s project in the Groundwork : to work out a pure moral philosophy, a moral philosophy that excludes all claims based on experience. A. A pure moral philosophy isolates moral laws, by setting aside all claims that rely on experience. B. That moral laws themselves (as against the application of these laws to the particular circumstances in which we find ourselves) do not depend on experience is evident from their absolute universality and necessity. C. The nature of morality’s demands: to be moral, we must do what morality requires of us, because morality requires it of us. D. How we investigate the a priori principles of morality in doing pure moral philosophy. E. Why is pure moral philosophy important? Why should we try to isolate and
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Unformatted text preview: articulate the a priori principles on which morality rests? III. The Will as Practical Reason A. Practical reason is the capacity to have insight into what you ought to do, to appreciate reasons you have for acting one way as against another. B. The will is the capacity to determine one’s actions on the basis of one’s appreciation of one’s reasons for action: it is the capacity to represent one’s ends and to choose among them. For next time (Wednesday, 3/24) , please read pp. vii- xi of Korsgaard’s Introduction, and pp. 7-10 of the actual text of the Groundwork (the first few pages of Section I). I recommend that you also read the Preface, pp. 1-6, but this is not required. What is a good will? What does it mean to say that the good will is good without limitation? What makes a good will good? State, in your own words, the argument Kant gives against thinking that the point of our having wills is that our wills help us to attain our happiness....
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2010 for the course TRAD justice an taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '10 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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Trad 104 lecture 1 - articulate the a priori principles on which morality rests III The Will as Practical Reason A Practical reason is the capacity

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