Chapter3_Compounds

Chapter3_Compounds - Chapter 3 Molecules and Compounds...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/10/10 Chapter 3 Molecules and Compounds
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5/10/10 Molecules Molecule - a structural unit that consists of two or more atoms which are chemically bound together and thus behaves as an independent unit. Usually consist of nonmetal elements .
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Two Types of Molecules Molecules of pure elements Diatomic elemental molecules: H2, N2, O2, F2, Cl2, Br2, I2. 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 6A 7A 8A (1) (2) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) H2 N2 O2 F2 P4 S8 Cl2 Se8 Br2 I2 diatomic molecules tetratomic molecules octatomic molecules
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5/10/10 Two Types of Molecules Molecules of pure elements Polyatomic elemental molecules: P4, S8, Se8.
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Two Types of Molecules Molecules of compounds
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5/10/10 Tro, Chemistry: A 66 Elements and Compounds elements combine together to make an almost limitless number of compounds the properties of the compound are
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5/10/10 Tro, Chemistry: A 77 Chemical Bonds compounds are made of atoms held together by chemical bonds bonds are forces of attraction between atoms the bonding attraction comes from attractions between protons and
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5/10/10 Tro, Chemistry: A 88 Bond Types two general types of bonding between atoms found in compounds, ionic and covalent ionic bonds result when electrons have been transferred between atoms, resulting in oppositely charged ions that attract each other generally found when metal atoms bonded to
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5/10/10 Ionic vs. Molecular Compounds Propane – contains individual C3H8 molecules Table salt – contains an array of Na+ ions and Cl- ions
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5/10/10 1010 Representing Compounds with Chemical Formula compounds are generally represented with a chemical formula the amount of information about the structure of the compound varies with the type of formula all formula and models convey a limited amount of information – none are perfect representations all chemical formulas tell what elements are in the compound
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5/10/10 Tro, Chemistry: A 1111 Types of Formula Empirical Formula Empirical Formula describe the kinds of elements found in the compound and the ratio of their atoms. Molecular Formula describe the kinds of elements found in the compound and the numbers of their atoms Structural Formula describe the kinds of elements found in the compound,
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5/10/10 Tro, Chemistry: A Molecular 1212 Formula Mass the mass of an individual molecule or formula unit also known as molecular mass or molecular weight sum of the masses of the atoms in a single molecule or formula unit whole = sum of the parts! mass of 1 molecule of H2O = 2(1.01 amu H) + 16.00 amu O =
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5/10/10 Tro, Chemistry: A Molecular 1313 Molar Mass of Compounds the relative masses of molecules can be calculated from atomic masses Formula Mass = 1 molecule of H2O = 2(1.01 amu H) + 16.00 amu O = 18.02 amu since 1 mole of H2O contains 2 moles of H and 1 mole of O Molar Mass = 1 mole H2O = 2(1.01 g H) + 16.00 g O = 18.02 g
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This note was uploaded on 05/05/2010 for the course BIO 101 taught by Professor Vaughan during the Spring '10 term at IUPUI.

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Chapter3_Compounds - Chapter 3 Molecules and Compounds...

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