front-matter - Particle Size Measurements Particle Size...

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Particle Size Measurements
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Particle Size Measurements Fundamentals, Practice, Quality Henk G. Merkus 1 J
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ISBN: 978-1-4020-9015-8 e-ISBN: 978-1-4020-9016-5 Library of Congress Control Number: 2008941080 © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. No part of this work may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microfilming, recording or otherwise, without written permission from the Publisher, with the exception of any material supplied specifically for the purpose of being entered and executed on a computer system, for exclusive use by the purchaser of the work. Printed on acid-free paper 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 springer.com Drs. Henk G. Merkus Former Ass. Professor Delft University of Technology Park Berkenoord 30 2641 CZ Pijnacker The Netherlands
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v Preface Following my graduation in physical organic chemistry at the University of Amster- dam, I started to work at the Royal Dutch Shell Laboratories in Amsterdam. My first assignment was research in the field of detergents and industrial chemicals. It was followed by development work on thermal wax cracking for production of C 2 – C 14 olefins and on acid-catalyzed synthesis of carboxylic acids from C 3 – C 6 olefins. Then, I made a significant change to analytical chemistry, first at Shell’s process development department and later in the chemical engineering department of Delft University of Technology. In both departments, there was a large variety of analyti- cal techniques and development of new methods for automated analysis of small process streams. It was the time that gas chromatography conquered the world. In this field, a firm basis was given by Henk Boer, Arie Kwantes and Frits Zuiderweg at Shell Research Laboratories in Amsterdam, both for packed and for capillary col- umns. The potential of gas chromatography was huge and, therefore, also in Delft, its use increased enormously. Moreover, the growth of this technique was facilitated significantly by the rapidly developing electronics industry. It not only led to digital peak integrators and personal computers but also enabled complex measurement techniques. In addition, I became involved in surface area and porosity characteriza- tion of catalysts and adsorbents, on which topic the research had been initiated by Prof. J.H. de Boer. Then, Prof. Brian Scarlett came to Delft to set up education and research in particle technology. He had a very broad vision for research topics in Delft. The responsibility for particle size analysis came to my laboratory, soon followed by a Malvern 2600 laser diffraction instrument and a Coulter counter. This was the time of modernization of particle size and shape analysis techniques and many confer- ences on this subject. We in Delft took our part in these developments and also acquired more commercial instruments. We were lucky to have outstanding PhD students to improve the techniques of laser diffraction, dynamic light scattering and
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