Economics%20116%20-%20Lecture%2011%20-%20Final

Economics%20116%20-%20Lecture%2011%20-%20Final - Economics...

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Unformatted text preview: Economics 116: Economic Development UC San Diego, Spring 2009 Prof. Karthik Muralidharan Department of Economics Lecture 11 Administrative Stuff • Midterm: – Bring your calculators – you’ll need them! No cell phone calculators allowed; any visible communication device will be treated as academic dishonesty – 75 minute exam – Mix of conceptual questions (like last time) and problems (calculation based) – A very clear grading rubric will be provided for each question; partial credit will be given so attempt everything; but points will only be given for clear demonstration of understanding of concepts – imprecise/vague statements won’t help you much – Only materials from lecture and problem sets will be on the exam (can include important stuff mentioned in lecture that are not in the notes – this includes readings that are explicitly mentioned in the slides or problem sets) – But, permutations of existing concepts are fair game! – Test may seem hard/tight on time – but graded on a curve – If you understand everything, you’ll be fine – if you try to wing it, you’ll be in trouble • No lunch this week – but extra office hours: – 4-6pm on Wednesday in Econ 304; 12:30 – 1:30pm on Thursday – TA office hours as usual (all will have materials from section this week) Lecture Outline (5/5/09) • Teacher Incentives • Private Schools and Vouchers Teacher Absence Summary Teacher absence in India (~25%) and other developing countries is high & correlated with both poor student attendance and test scores- High level of variation across states and countries Poorer states/countries have higher absence- Additional spending by itself is least effective where most needed- Another possible mechanism of a poverty trap? More highly paid teachers are most absent! - More powerful teachers likely to be absent (male, older, more educated, and more senior teachers more likely to be absent)- Suggests that what matters for performance is not the level of pay, but rather the structure of pay Teacher Incentives Two recent studies show that improving teacher incentives can be a highly cost effective way of improving learning outcomes- Both are highly credible randomized evaluations Duflo, Hanna, and Ryan (2008)- Equip schools with cameras with time and date stamps- Teachers only get paid for valid days of attendance (picture taken with students at beginning and end of school day)!- Find that teacher attendance increases dramatically!- Student test scores also go up Muralidharan and Sundararaman (2009)- Experiment with paying teachers bonuses on the basis of average improvement of test scores of students (group and individual)- Find large positive effects on test scores- Three times as cost effective as spending more money on more schooling inputs- No negative effects (teaching to the test, effort substitution, gaming, etc) 6 Age Competency (e.g....
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This note was uploaded on 05/06/2010 for the course ECON ECON 116 taught by Professor Muralidharan during the Spring '09 term at UCSD.

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Economics%20116%20-%20Lecture%2011%20-%20Final - Economics...

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