intro metabolism review bioenergetics

intro metabolism review bioenergetics - Introduction to...

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Introduction to Metabolism and Review of Bioenergetics BIOC 460 Spring 2010 What is the basic strategy for converting energy from food? What conditions in the cell drive metabolic reactions? What general principles can be applied to determine whether a cell will favor catabolism or anabolism in a given set of conditions?
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Learning Objectives Discuss the purpose of metabolic reactions in terms of energy flow and energy carriers. Relate the free energy of oxidation of a hydrocarbon to its oxidation state. Recognize the structure and explain the function of the electron carrier molecules NAD+, FAD, and NADP+. Write the equations relating G’ to mass action ratio, Q , and be able to calculate different variables using these equations. Describe two ways endergonic reactions can be made energetically favorable in cells. Explain why is ATP the universal energy currency and why its hydrolysis has a large negative G. List the characteristics of bonds that release large amounts of free energy when broken. Define energy charge and calculate cellular energy charge under a variety of different conditions. Reading Chapter 15 and review Dr. Tama’s bioenergetics lecture Problems 1, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12, and 15 plus Metabolism Problem set
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Living organisms are machines that perform work Work: amount of energy transferred by a force Examples of biological work: Locomotion: Mechanical work Neural activity: Electrical work Digestion of food: Chemical work Adapted from T.S. Tsao
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Adapted from T.S. Tsao
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Prof. Richard Muller, UC Berkeley Adapted from T.S. Tsao How can this be?
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Similarities between you and your car (more importantly, what does that have to do with metabolism and bioenergetics?) Energy derived from oxidation of hydrocarbons (lipids around 16 carbons for humans, octanes and other hydrocarbons between 5 and 12 carbons) or carbohydrates (glucose in humans, ethanol in cars) Consumes oxygen for oxidation Product of oxidation of hydrocarbons: CO 2 and H 2 O (Incomplete oxidation of cars produce hydrocarbons and CO.) Slow oxidation of fuel optimized to convert energy to mechanical work as opposed to fast oxidation in explosion to convert energy to heat and gas expansion. You even have the same (rotary) engine to produce work. Frequent breakdowns as they get older Adapted from T.S. Tsao
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is about energy . Specifically the flow
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intro metabolism review bioenergetics - Introduction to...

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