L_593247_2010-01-07

L_593247_2010-01-07 - Question 1 (10 points) Below are the...

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Question 1 (10 points) Below are the results of an experiment in which (1) a large carbohydrate and (2) a large protein meal were given to a normal person and to a person with diabetes mellitus. Plasma insulin, glucagon and glucose concentrations were measured (Figs. 11 and 12). Questions: With regard to normal response to the carbohydrate meal: 1. What are the three metabolic pathways by which a rise in plasma insulin leads to a fall in plasma glucose? Fig. 11 (left) .--Results of experiment in which a large carbohydrate meal was given to a normal and to a diabetic person. (From Muller, W. A., et al.: Abnormal alpha- cell function in diabetes, New England J. Med. 283:110, 1970.) Fig. 12 (right) .--Results of experiment in which a large protein meal was given to a normal and a diabetic person. (From Muller, W. A., et al.: Abnormal alpha-cell function in diabetes, New England J. Med. 283:110, 1970.) ATP production, amino acid synthesis, triglyceride synthesis. (not glycogenesis) Insulin facilitates the removal of glucose from plasma by enhancing membrane transport of glucose. Glycogen synthesis, primarily in skeletal muscle, is enhanced due to increased activity of glycogen synthetase. Lipogenesis in liver and adipose tissue is enhanced by increased activity of several enzymes and depressed activity of several others. In addition, oxidation of glucose is enhanced in most cells by insulin (Tepperman, p. 172; Guyton, pp. 915-917; Ganong, pp. 256-257). Save answer
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Question 2 (10 points) Below are the results of an experiment in which (1) a large carbohydrate and (2) a large protein meal were given to a normal person and to a person with diabetes mellitus. Plasma insulin, glucagon and glucose concentrations were measured (Figs. 11 and 12). Questions: With regard to normal response to the carbohydrate meal: 2. What are at least four controllers of insulin release? Fig. 11 (left) .--Results of experiment in which a large carbohydrate meal was given to a normal and to a diabetic person. (From Muller, W. A., et al.: Abnormal alpha-cell function in diabetes, New England J. Med. 283:110, 1970.) Fig. 12 (right) .--Results of experiment in which a large protein meal was given to a normal and a diabetic person. (From Muller, W. A., et al.: Abnormal alpha-cell function in diabetes, New England J. Med. 283:110, 1970.) High blood glucose levels, Acetylcholine, arginine, leucine, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) Insulin secretion is enhanced by increased plasma glucose acting directly on the beta-cell, secretin, gastrin and cholecystokinin, glucagon, vagal stimulation, increased plasma amino acids glucose secretin gastrin cholecystokinin amino acids Save answer Question 3 (10 points) Below are the results of an experiment in which (1) a large carbohydrate and (2) a large protein meal were given to a normal person and to a person with diabetes mellitus. Plasma insulin, glucagon and glucose concentrations were measured (Figs. 11 and 12).
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This note was uploaded on 05/06/2010 for the course CHE 1103 taught by Professor Ermler during the Fall '08 term at Texas San Antonio.

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L_593247_2010-01-07 - Question 1 (10 points) Below are the...

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