SOUTH AFRICA AND AFRICA - South America & Africa Food...

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Unformatted text preview: South America & Africa Food Science 470 Wine Appreciati on Dr. Christian E. BUTZKE Associate Professor of Enology Department of Food Science butzke@purdue.edu 765.494.6500 FS Room 1261 History Geography Statistics Growing areas Grape varieties South America & Africa World Viticulture 50 20C 10C 10C 20C 0 50 42 32 CA IN 2500 miles South America 42 32 CA IN Topography Seasons reversed ! Harvest February - April 42 32 CA IN Latitude Comparison 42 32 CA IN Latitude Comparison South America Chile Argentina Winegrowing Principles Chile Coastal valleys => Mediterranean climate Humboldt current => Cool air, fog Along the Andes => Cool + irrigation water Deep soils => protection from drought Isolated location Furrow irrigation => Phylloxera-free Brings cold air and cloudy, foggy weather to the coastal regions and into river valleys Creates fairly constant moderate temperatures Inland, the influence is most marked at night, cooling the hot summer air Since Chile is so narrow (110 miles on average), many of A frigid stream of water from Antarctica Humboldt Current History South America The first vineyards were planted in 1541, after the conquest of the Inca empire by Pizarro and his Spanish conquistadores Incas had created a network of canals and furrows Created perfect winegrowing conditions Corts had 10 vines planted for every native killed Grapes were used to make sacramental wine Beginning in 1600, the cultivation of grapevines and wine production grew rapidly, reducing the need to trade wine and spirits between Spain and America Chile A series of decrees from 1620 to 1654 prohibited new plantings and imposed taxes on existing vineyards as protectionist measures for Spanish wine exports Chiles independence from Spain in 1818 greatly increased trade with the outside world In 1830, an illustrious Frenchman, Claude Gay, persuaded Chilean government officials to develop a state viticulture program looking for the best vines for the region Chile By the middle of the 19th century, a complete transformation of the wine industry and the beginning of modern winemaking had begun In the mid-1800s, everything French became fashionable in Chile, especially winemaking Wealthy owners of copper or coal mines invested in vineyards and hired French enologists Chile 1850s 1930s: Rapid development of vineyards and wine quality...
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2010 for the course FS 470 taught by Professor Christianbutzke during the Spring '10 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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SOUTH AFRICA AND AFRICA - South America & Africa Food...

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