jisctsw_05_01

jisctsw_05_01 - JISC Technology and Standards Watch Future...

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Unformatted text preview: JISC Technology and Standards Watch Future Location-Based Experiences Future Location-Based Experiences Professor Steve Benford School of Computer Science & IT The University of Nottingham This report was peer reviewed by: Andy Ramsden Learning Technology Support Service University of Bristol George Roussos School of Computer Science and Information Systems Birkbeck College, University of London Jon Traxler Centre for Learning and Teaching University of Wolverhampton Jon Trinder Dept of Electrical and Electronic Engineering University of Glasgow 1 JISC Technology and Standards Watch Future Location-Based Experiences Future Location-Based Experiences Professor Steve Benford School of Computer Science & IT The University of Nottingham sdb@cs.nott.ac.uk EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Location-based experiences extend digital media out into the physical world – be it across a campus, the city streets or into remote wilderness. Users with mobile displays move through the world. Sensors capture information about their current context, including their location, and this is used to deliver them an experience that changes according to where they are, what they are doing, and maybe even how they are feeling. As a result, the user becomes unchained from their PC and experiences digital media that is interwoven with the everyday world, and that is potentially available in any place and at any time. This Technology Watch report considers the relevance of location-based experiences to education, discussing potential applications, reviewing the underlying technologies and identifying key challenges for the future. The research community has already demonstrated a variety of location-based experiences that are of relevance to education including: information services and tour-guides in which information is delivered in situ ; educational games in which a combination of mobile and online users learn together; support for field trips in which the technology provides access to learning materials during a visit to a site of special historical or scientific interest; and support for field science in which learners actively gather data from the environment for subsequent analysis back at base. These emerging applications can be delivered over a heterogeneous collection of technologies that consist of three core components: mobile devices, wireless networking and location-sensing. Mobile devices include current commercial products such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptop computers, mobile gaming consoles and personal media players, as well as alternatives that have not yet left the research labs, e.g. wearable computing, smart fabrics, tangible and embedded interfaces, and mobile 3D displays. Wireless networking includes: three generations of mobile telephony–GSM, GPRS and now 3G (as commercial services for mobile phones); the 802.11 family of wireless network protocols which can be deployed directly by users and their organisations; and local ad hoc mechanisms such as Bluetooth. Finally, a very wide range of location-sensing technologies is mechanisms such as Bluetooth....
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This note was uploaded on 05/07/2010 for the course DMO electro23 taught by Professor Taflove during the Spring '10 term at Unicamp.

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jisctsw_05_01 - JISC Technology and Standards Watch Future...

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