intelligibility

intelligibility - Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

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Unformatted text preview: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science 6.345/HST.728 Automatic Speech Recognition Spring, 2010 Guest Lecturer: Louis D. Braida Sensory Communication Group Research Laboratory of Electronics Notes on Intelligibility Figure 1: Dependence of intelligibility on the number of items (monosyllabic words) in the test vocabulary (from Miller, Heise, and Lichten, 1951). 1 Figure 2: Dependence of word identification score on speech to noise ratio for keywords spoken in sentences (five per sentence) and for the same words spoken in isolation (from Miller, Heise, and Lichten, 1951). 2 Figure 3: Relation between word identification scores for high- and low-predictability sen- tences (from Bilger, 1984). 3 Figure 4: Dependence of syllable articultion (intelligibility score, S , percentage of syllables identified correctly) on presentation level and cutoff frequency of highpass and lowpass filters....
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This note was uploaded on 05/08/2010 for the course CS 6.345 taught by Professor Glass during the Spring '10 term at MIT.

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intelligibility - Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

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